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Christopher Reeve

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BUSINESS
October 27, 1998
United Payors & United Providers Inc., a Rockville-based financial services company supporting the health care industry, reported record revenue and net income yesterday for the third quarter that ended Sept. 30.The company also said it had signed an agreement whereby Christopher Reeve, the actor best known for playing Superman in films before he was paralyzed in a horse-riding accident, will be the spokesman for UP&UP's national network of hospitals and physicians.In addition, the company said Reeve will be featured in a series of television and radio commercials pitching the product of another firm, HealthExtras, which offers catastrophic and supplemental health insurance.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 15, 2006
Young children -- especially those who are baseball fans -- doubtless will enjoy Everyone's Hero, the animated adventures of a young boy who tries to reunite Babe Ruth with his bat so that the Yankees can win the 1932 World Series. Parents, even as they groan at the film's overbearing simplicity and forced sense of whimsy, also are likely to embrace its message: Believe in yourself. Never give up. Always remember that miracles can happen. Everyone's Hero (20th Century Fox) Featuring the voices of Rob Reiner, Whoopi Goldberg, William H. Macy, Robin Williams.
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FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | May 8, 1996
At one time he could fly through the air and leap tall buildings in a single bound. Today he can't leave his wheelchair and can breathe on his own only for short periods. Christopher Reeve is disabled, and the dark irony of his fate is that he was the actor who had played the role of a being who went beyond all known human physical possibilities.Of course, Superman is a fiction, a comic-strip character. But the superman is also a metaphor that encourages those determined to push beyond the expected limits.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL MUSKAL and MICHAEL MUSKAL,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 8, 2006
Dana Reeve, an actress whose days of sunny fame with her star husband, Christopher, turned into an odyssey of tragedy and hope, died Monday night of lung cancer. Mrs. Reeve, 44, gave up her entertainment career to care for her husband during his 10 years of almost complete paralysis, when she and Christopher became fighting symbols for those who refused to give up, even against the most desperate odds. She used her celebrity to campaign for stem cell and other medical research to treat spinal cord injuries like the one that paralyzed her husband, best known for his Superman starring roles.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 12, 2004
Until his spinal-cord injury, Christopher Reeve was regularly dismissed as a lightweight actor, a guy cast as Superman because he looked the part, a marginal screen presence at best. All of which goes to show how shortsighted, not to mention unfair, reputations can be. Reeve, who died Sunday at age 52, was great in the first two Superman films, very good in movies like The Bostonians and The Remains of the Day (both Merchant-Ivory productions) and solid in Somewhere in Time, Deathtrap, and most of the other 30-some pictures he made.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Frank D. Roylance and Erika Niedowski and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2004
In the nine years since on-screen superhero Christopher Reeve tumbled from a horse and broke his neck, the field of spinal cord injury research has been all but transformed. At the time of the actor's accident, embryonic stem-cell research wasn't yet a reality. Scientists didn't understand the immune system's role in spinal cord repair. And researchers hadn't identified a key protein that stops central nervous system cells from regenerating. Fast forward to 2004, when paralyzed patients are more hopeful than ever that science will one day return what they have lost: the ability to walk.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2005
Dr. John McDonald wore a satisfied expression as a 21-year-old patient, paralyzed from the neck down in a diving accident, walked on a slow-moving treadmill. It wasn't walking as most people know it. Without electrodes firing his weakened muscles, his legs would barely move. Without two therapists physically placing one foot in front of the other, he would likely stumble. And without a body sling suspended from above, he would surely fall. To McDonald, recruited earlier this year to head a spinal-cord injury program at Baltimore's Kennedy Krieger Institute, there is nothing futile about exercising limbs that can barely move on their own. The 43-year-old neurologist says his work with the late actor Christopher Reeve demonstrated that exercise might hold the key to something scientists long considered impossible - reactivating neural pathways that have been silent for years.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 15, 2006
Young children -- especially those who are baseball fans -- doubtless will enjoy Everyone's Hero, the animated adventures of a young boy who tries to reunite Babe Ruth with his bat so that the Yankees can win the 1932 World Series. Parents, even as they groan at the film's overbearing simplicity and forced sense of whimsy, also are likely to embrace its message: Believe in yourself. Never give up. Always remember that miracles can happen. Everyone's Hero (20th Century Fox) Featuring the voices of Rob Reiner, Whoopi Goldberg, William H. Macy, Robin Williams.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL MUSKAL and MICHAEL MUSKAL,LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 8, 2006
Dana Reeve, an actress whose days of sunny fame with her star husband, Christopher, turned into an odyssey of tragedy and hope, died Monday night of lung cancer. Mrs. Reeve, 44, gave up her entertainment career to care for her husband during his 10 years of almost complete paralysis, when she and Christopher became fighting symbols for those who refused to give up, even against the most desperate odds. She used her celebrity to campaign for stem cell and other medical research to treat spinal cord injuries like the one that paralyzed her husband, best known for his Superman starring roles.
FEATURES
March 25, 1996
Christopher Reeve, paralyzed in a horse-jumping accident last May, will soon take another step in his recovery -- he's going to be taking a job.No, he's not acting, yet, but he has agreed to tape short introductory segments for an animated Christmas special. The show's producers are hoping to have it on the air on a network next winter.Outside of several interview appearances, this special is believed to be Mr. Reeve's first professional work since his crippling spinal injury. The special, "The Lion and the Lamb," was actually produced two years ago, with Mr. Reeve and singer Amy Grant providing the voices for the lead characters.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2005
Dr. John McDonald wore a satisfied expression as a 21-year-old patient, paralyzed from the neck down in a diving accident, walked on a slow-moving treadmill. It wasn't walking as most people know it. Without electrodes firing his weakened muscles, his legs would barely move. Without two therapists physically placing one foot in front of the other, he would likely stumble. And without a body sling suspended from above, he would surely fall. To McDonald, recruited earlier this year to head a spinal-cord injury program at Baltimore's Kennedy Krieger Institute, there is nothing futile about exercising limbs that can barely move on their own. The 43-year-old neurologist says his work with the late actor Christopher Reeve demonstrated that exercise might hold the key to something scientists long considered impossible - reactivating neural pathways that have been silent for years.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Frank D. Roylance and Erika Niedowski and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | October 12, 2004
In the nine years since on-screen superhero Christopher Reeve tumbled from a horse and broke his neck, the field of spinal cord injury research has been all but transformed. At the time of the actor's accident, embryonic stem-cell research wasn't yet a reality. Scientists didn't understand the immune system's role in spinal cord repair. And researchers hadn't identified a key protein that stops central nervous system cells from regenerating. Fast forward to 2004, when paralyzed patients are more hopeful than ever that science will one day return what they have lost: the ability to walk.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 12, 2004
Until his spinal-cord injury, Christopher Reeve was regularly dismissed as a lightweight actor, a guy cast as Superman because he looked the part, a marginal screen presence at best. All of which goes to show how shortsighted, not to mention unfair, reputations can be. Reeve, who died Sunday at age 52, was great in the first two Superman films, very good in movies like The Bostonians and The Remains of the Day (both Merchant-Ivory productions) and solid in Somewhere in Time, Deathtrap, and most of the other 30-some pictures he made.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | November 21, 1998
Network television has something to prove this year: that it can make movies better than cable. And that means better viewing options for the audience in this final weekend of the first major "sweeps" ratings month of the season. Audience ratings taken in November will help determine future advertising rates on network row. And instead of cheap, women-in-jeopardy or disease-of-the-month movies this weekend, CBS and ABC have films -- a Hallmark Hall of Fame production of Anne Tyler's "Saint Maybe" and a remake of "Rear Window" starring Christopher Reeve -- that are better than the best HBO has to offer: Stanley Tucci in tonight's "Winchell," a docudrama on the life of gossip Walter Winchell.
BUSINESS
October 27, 1998
United Payors & United Providers Inc., a Rockville-based financial services company supporting the health care industry, reported record revenue and net income yesterday for the third quarter that ended Sept. 30.The company also said it had signed an agreement whereby Christopher Reeve, the actor best known for playing Superman in films before he was paralyzed in a horse-riding accident, will be the spokesman for UP&UP's national network of hospitals and physicians.In addition, the company said Reeve will be featured in a series of television and radio commercials pitching the product of another firm, HealthExtras, which offers catastrophic and supplemental health insurance.
FEATURES
October 30, 1997
All sorts of witches, hobgoblins and other creatures of the night take over Nickelodeon today.A day of kid-themed Halloween programming kicks off with "Inspector Gadget" (2 p.m.-2: 30 p.m.) and includes episodes of "Beetlejuice" (3 p.m.-3: 30 p.m.) and "Are You Afraid of the Dark?" (5 p.m.-5: 30 p.m.).The ghostly goings-on continue when the reruns of Nick-at-Nite take over, including a haunted lakeside lodge on "The Dick Van Dyke Show" (10: 30 p.m.-11 p.m., repeats 2: 30 a.m.-3 a.m.), a take-off on "War of the Worlds" on "Newhart" (11 p.m.-11: 30 p.m., repeats 3 a.m.-3: 30 a.m.)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,Sun Staff Writer | April 28, 1995
Now, children. Be nice. Don't impale anyone with a broom today.A fat lot of good it would do to scold the kids in "Village of the Damned," John Carpenter's remake of the 1960 sci-fi flick. In their platinum-blond wigs, gray outfits and bad attitudes, they make the Hitler Youth look cuddly.This down-with-people story began with a John Wyndham novel called "The Midwich Cuckoos," so named for the cuckoo, which lays its eggs in other birds' nests. Carpenter, who also remade "The Thing," has updated the 1957 book and 1960 movie to the '90s, but sometimes it's hard to tell.
NEWS
May 29, 1995
Christopher Reeve hurt in horse-jumping eventWhile engaging in a horse jumping competition Saturday, Christopher Reeve was thrown from his steed and wound up in the hospital.Mr. Reeve, 42, was approaching the third jump of a 15-jump course when "something spooked the horse," said Monk Reynolds, owner of Commonwealth Park in Culpeper, Va. "His horse just stopped dead and threw him."Mr. Reeve, best known for his performances in the "Superman" movies, appeared to suffer a neck injury and was carried off the field on a stretcher.
FEATURES
By Chris Vognar and Chris Vognar,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | April 19, 1997
The terms "cable movie" and "minimalist filmmaking" aren't often used together in the same sentence.But most cable movies don't possess the quiet polish and power of "In the Gloaming," Christopher Reeve's directorial debut, which airs tomorrow on HBO."In the Gloaming" has been much publicized as the return of former Superman Reeve, paralyzed from the neck down in an equestrian accident two years ago. While Reeve's bravery certainly makes for a moving sidelight, the film itself has folks buzzing about his promise behind the camera.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | August 26, 1996
TONIGHT AT the Democratic convention, they'll wheel out Christopher Reeve for all the world to see. Everyone except Christopher Reeve (and a few other disabled people in the crowd, strategically placed in view of the TV cameras) will stand.Many will weep. And then they'll smile, wiping away tears, as Reeve speaks.It will be an emotional moment, as we once again see Superman in a wheelchair, we hear Superman's determination to some day climb out of that wheelchair and we root for Superman to fly, or at least to walk.
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