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NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 19, 2002
A WORD OF thanks is due to the Order Sons of Italy in America (OSIA), which published a brochure called Columbus: Fact vs. Fiction just in time for the celebration of the holiday named for the Italian explorer, which took place Monday. Reviewing our grade school history, we're reminded that Christopher Columbus is the guy credited with discovering America, sailing on the Nina, Pinta and Santa Maria in 1492 from Europe to the West Indies. For years, he was revered as a bold explorer who helped alter the course of history.
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NEWS
October 11, 2012
Columbus Day passed, and we were forced to celebrate a half-truth. As a 10th grader, I appreciate honoring extraordinary individuals to look up to, and it's undeniable that Christopher Columbus connected the Old World with a new one. However, society accepts this apocryphal narration without learning the frequently omitted facts, namely, the horrifying acts of bigotry and villainy Columbus executed and oversaw. Even before he reached San Salvador, Columbus committed his first offense, pocketing the money he had promised to the first man able to discern land.
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NEWS
January 2, 2009
On December 29, 2008, COLUMBUS. Visitation 2140 N. Fulton Avenue, Sunday 2 to 6 P.M. Family will receive friends Monday at New Life Fellowship Church of Christ, 559 Robert Street at 10:30 A.M. Funeral at 11 A.M.
EXPLORE
October 13, 2011
Columbus Day came and went this week with little fanfare. Some folks were off for a Monday holiday; others had to work. It wasn't the focal point of a lot of celebration, pomp or public pageantry, though in some communities and in some places it is a rather important holiday. Unfortunately, Christopher Columbus has fallen from favor in the lexicon of historic figures who are regarded as heroes. His big claim to fame - unbeknownst to him, by the way - had long been his discovery of the Americas.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | August 29, 1996
When Christopher Columbus crossed the Atlantic for the first time, he discovered a native people who delighted in chewing and smoking the dried, pungent leaves of a plant unknown to Europe. Indians consumed them to enhance prayers, ward off illness, to relax.Some of the crewmen indulged out of curiosity and found the leaves to their liking -- and did not stop. Columbus berated his men for succumbing to a custom that apparently repelled him. But he eventually relented, declaring: "It's not within their power to refrain from indulging in the habit."
BUSINESS
By Kevin Thomas and Kevin Thomas,Evening Sun Staff | July 26, 1991
The contest between two area development firms vying to see which would win the right to build a multimillion-dollar marine research center in the Inner Harbor has come to a biblical conclusion.After weeks in which it seemed only an act of Solomon would end the deliberations over whether the Rouse Co. or the smaller Manekin Corp. would win the lucrative contract, the nine members of the Christopher Columbus Development Inc. voted last night to pick Rouse.The selection means the Rouse will take over development and ultimately management of the $164 million Christopher Columbus Center for Marine Research and Exploration.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | January 1, 1992
TAKE ONE. It's 1992, the 500th anniversary year of the discovery of America by the brave and brilliant Admiral of the Ocean Sea, Christopher Columbus.CUT!Take two. It's 1992, the 500th anniversary year of the European encounter with the New World.CUT!Take three. It's 1992, the 500th anniversary year of the vicious, savage European assault on the generous, noble, peaceful peoples of the Western Hemisphere, leading, as it did, to all the evils that now exist.Okay, that's a wrap.Actually, it's a rap, and a bad rap at that, but that is not what I want to write about on this first day of the Columbus quincentennial.
NEWS
By Mary Knudson | October 13, 1991
Molecular biologist Thomas T. Chen has figured out how to fool Mother Nature.The fish he bathes in growth hormone or embryos he injects with growth hormone genes grow 20 to 80 percent faster than fish left with the amount of the hormone nature gave them, according to his studies.Manipulating the genetic makeup of living things to make them better, bigger, faster-growing and disease resistant is the mission of the Center of Marine Biotechnology in Baltimore. And the marine biotech center will form the cornerstone of the Christopher Columbus Center of Marine Research and Exploration being dedicated today.
NEWS
By Nancy Lawson and Nancy Lawson,Evening Sun Staff | October 8, 1990
Christopher Columbus accidentally stumbled upon America while sailing untraveled waters five centuries ago.Yesterday, however, the worn, heavily traveled streets ofBaltimore had to be blocked to make way for his modern counterpart, Donald Castranova, perched atop a parade float impersonating the man the city has been honoring annually for the last 100 years.Castranova, a leader of a Baltimore Italian dance group called Balli D'Italia, was one of hundreds representing different cultures for the 100th Christopher Columbus parade, which focused on the theme of the city's ethnic diversity.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | November 15, 1990
HOLLYWOOD -- Is there room on the Atlantic Ocean -- and on the big screen -- for two Christopher Columbuses?There was room last week in the trade papers for splashy multi-page ads touting two such projects, both to be released in 1992 to capitalize on the 500th anniversary of the Italian explorer's voyage to North America in the service of Spain.Producers Alexander and Ilya Salkind are working with a script by Mario Puzo, "Christopher Columbus: The Movie," with plans to begin shooting in April.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2010
Growing up, Michelle Bagley aspired to become an actress yet also had a interest in the sciences. She went on to combine the two, ultimately becoming a Centennial High School science teacher who considers her classroom a stage, inspiring students in a sometimes unpopular subject. The New York-based Christopher Columbus Fellowship Foundation took notice. The independent federal agency established by Congress to support and encourage discovery is giving Bagley its Life Sciences Award.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts | January 31, 2010
It cannot be that I shall live and die a slave. I will take to the water. This very bay shall yet bear me into freedom. - Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass H e had always loved the Chesapeake Bay and enjoyed history, but for the longest time, when Vince Leggett tried to blend his twin passions, he was left with some haunting questions. "I'd read of all the shipbuilders, boat captains and shipping magnates who supposedly made bay history, most of them members of the majority community," says Leggett, a public historian and former schools administrator who lives in Annapolis.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,jonathan.pitts@baltsun.com | January 31, 2010
It cannot be that I shall live and die a slave. I will take to the water. This very bay shall yet bear me into freedom. - Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass He had always loved the Chesapeake Bay and enjoyed history, but for the longest time, when Vince Leggett tried to blend his twin passions, he was left with some haunting questions. "I'd read of all the shipbuilders, boat captains and shipping magnates who supposedly made bay history, most of them members of the majority community," says Leggett, a public historian and former schools administrator who lives in Annapolis.
NEWS
January 2, 2009
On December 29, 2008, COLUMBUS. Visitation 2140 N. Fulton Avenue, Sunday 2 to 6 P.M. Family will receive friends Monday at New Life Fellowship Church of Christ, 559 Robert Street at 10:30 A.M. Funeral at 11 A.M.
NEWS
By Timothy J. Gilfoyle and Timothy J. Gilfoyle,Chicago Tribune | May 20, 2007
The Original Knickerbocker The Life of Washington Irving By Andrew Burstein Basic Books / 420 pages / $27.50 Few Americans read Washington Irving today. The author of short-story classics like "Rip Van Winkle" and "The Legend of Sleepy Hollow," influential biographies of Christopher Columbus and George Washington and popular travelogues is largely confined to the syllabuses of upper-level college and graduate-school classrooms. Irving's sentimental and English style lost favor over the 19th and 20th centuries, especially compared with the tall tales of Davy Crockett, the social criticism of Mark Twain and the plebeian poetry of Walt Whitman.
BUSINESS
By Jay Hancock | April 17, 2005
YOU ALWAYS said your boss was a maniac. Now experts back you up. John D. Gartner, Johns Hopkins assistant professor of psychiatry, believes U.S. business is replete with leaders whose brains are just a few dopamine molecules shy of earning them a label from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. That's a good thing, he says. In his new book, The Hypomanic Edge: The Link Between (A Little) Craziness and (A Lot of) Success in America, Gartner argues that the benefits delivered by exuberant, driven, slightly nutso entrepreneurs outweigh the numerous drawbacks.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1996
New positionsChristopher Columbus Development Center appoints threeThe Christopher Columbus Development Center announced the appointments of Joseph B. Schaffer as chief financial officer, Joan M. Pesek as associate director of institutional development and Rosalia Scalia as a media relations representative.Schaffer, a University of Maryland graduate, was formerly CFO for Bally Manager Inc. He is a member of the Maryland JayCees and is active in athletic programs at Glen Burnie High School.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 26, 1993
COLUMBUS, Ohio -- The winter wind is blowing hard and mean, the Ku Klux Klan wants a permit to demonstrate downtown, and the city's beloved Ohio State Buckeyes are headed for one of those second-tier bowl games that no one really cares about.So, maybe it is a good thing that the people of Columbus have something else to fuss over these days: Should a 500-ton statue of Christopher Columbus that is 6 feet taller than the Statue of Liberty be put near the Scioto River, not far from the life-size replica of the Santa Maria and the other monuments dedicated to the man and the myth?
NEWS
January 21, 2005
Spanish researchers say they've won permission to open a tomb in the Dominican Republic purported to hold the remains of Christopher Columbus, edging closer to solving a century-old mystery over whether those bones or a rival set in Spain are the real thing. A team of two high school teachers from Seville and a leading Spanish forensic geneticist has been testing 500-year-old bone slivers for more than two years to try to pinpoint the final resting place of the explorer who arrived in the New World by accident in 1492 on an expedition chartered by Spain's King Ferdinand and Queen Isabel.
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