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Christopher Brown

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By Jessica Anderson and Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2012
A Baltimore County police officer was indicted Wednesday in the death of a Randallstown teen, but the charges drew criticism from the boy's mother and the community, who continued calls for an outside investigation. James D. Laboard, a nine-year veteran, faces charges of voluntary and involuntary manslaughter in the asphyxiation death of 17-year-old Christopher Brown, whom police said he chased after a group of teens threw a rock at his front door on June 13. Each count carries a maximum of 10 years in prison.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2013
Daphne Alston understands why so many people are outraged by the killing of Trayvon Martin, the unarmed Florida teen shot by a self-appointed neighborhood watchman. She just doesn't get why nobody seems to care about the deaths of many other unarmed young men - especially those in similar situations closer to home, such as Christopher Brown, 17, who died in an altercation with a Baltimore County police officer. "We took buses, trains and helicopters to get down to Florida, because there was another nationality that was against us," Alston said Sunday, referring to the Martin case.
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NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2012
Almost two months after Christopher Brown died outside a Randallstown home, the family of the slain teen continues to ask that the state's attorney's office seek murder charges against the Baltimore County police officer accused in his death. Tuesday night at a meeting organized by the family, Brown's mother, Chris, said that she wants the Baltimore County State's Attorney's office to pursue a second-degree murder charge against Officer James D. Laboard, who is awaiting a trial date on voluntary and involuntary manslaughter charges.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 13, 2013
When Baltimore County police officer James D. Laboard was acquitted last month in the death of 17-year-old Christopher Brown, he was entitled to back pay he lost after his indictment. The officer also requested and received overtime for the June 2012 night he confronted Brown, who was with a group of teens who had thrown rocks at the officer's door. When Laboard caught up to Brown, the two fought and the teen died of asphyxiation. The request supports "the stipulation that he was on duty," said Laboard's attorney, Ezra S. Gollogly.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 13, 2012
Christopher Brown's family and other supporters gathered in Towson again to protest what they believe are weak charges brought against the police officer charged in the teen's death. The crowd gathered outside the Baltimore County Circuit courthouse Monday - exactly two months after Brown's death - to lobby the state's attorney's office to consider murder charges against James D. Laboard. The Baltimore County officer faces manslaughter charges. The family's attorney, Russell Neverdon, said he believes Laboard could have received a stricter second-degree murder charge given that Laboard chased Brown before the teen died from asphyxiation.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
Baltimore County police officer James D. Laboard was playing Jenga at his Randallstown home when he heard the rock hit his door. The officer ran out and chased the teenager he saw running away, his lawyers said, touching off an altercation that led to Christopher Brown's "completely accidental" death. The account came Tuesday during Laboard's manslaughter trial, in which the defense laid out his side of the story for the first time. His attorneys said in opening statements that Brown, 17, had punched the off-duty officer and that Laboard had used his body weight in an attempt to subdue the teen.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2012
Only James D. Laboard knows his intentions the night Baltimore County police said the off-duty officer chased a group of teens who had thrown a rock at his home. But as authorities considered charges in the ensuing death of Christopher Brown, they had to try to discern Laboard's intentions. Laboard was charged with two counts of manslaughter — one involuntary — in the asphyxiation death of the Randallstown High School teen; either count could carry a 10-year sentence. The victim's mother expressed outrage that the officer isn't facing more severe charges, alleging that the officer received preferential treatment and calling for an outside investigation.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2012
Christen Brown won't ever forget the phone call she received just before 4 a.m. June 14 - when she learned her little brother had died after an altercation with a police officer. "I just wouldn't believe it," she said Monday evening at a rally in Towson, describing the phone call from her mother. About 50 members of Christopher Brown's family and community, as well as others, gathered outside the Baltimore County Courts Building to protest what they believe to be preferential treatment of an off-duty officer charged in the 17-year-old's death.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2012
The trial for the Baltimore County police officer charged in the death of a Randallstown teenager has been scheduled to begin Dec. 11. Officer James D. Laboard, who has been charged with manslaughter in the death of 17-year-old Christopher Brown, appeared in Baltimore County Circuit Court on Tuesday to schedule the trial date. Wearing a light-green button-down shirt and tie, he sat quietly next to his attorney. Police said Laboard and Brown got into a physical confrontation June 13 in which Brown fell unconscious and the officer tried unsuccessfully to resuscitate him. Brown had been with a group of teens who threw rocks at the officer's front door when, police said, Laboard chased Brown to a nearby home.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
A visibly relieved James D. Laboard hugged family members Thursday after jurors found the Baltimore County police officer not guilty in the death of the teenager he chased down and fought last June. Seventeen-year-old Christopher Brown had been with a group of boys who threw a rock at Laboard's door before the off-duty officer found him, and neither side in the case disputed that Brown had died as a result of the ensuing altercation. But a jury decided after a four-day trial that Laboard had not broken the law by placing the teen in the neck restraint that the state argued had killed him. The officer has not spoken publicly and did not testify.
NEWS
June 24, 2013
Yes, Baltimore County State's Attorney Scott Shellenberger, a crime was committed, but it wasn't by James Laboard ("Officer found not guilty," June 21). Mr. Laboard was in his home watching his TV when a gang of kids threw a rock at his front door. Never mind the fact that this wasn't the first time they had done this to Mr. Laboard's home and others in the neighborhood! Mr. Laboard's home was vandalized. He had every right to be angry. The fact that he is a police officer should never have been mentioned in court or in the newspapers.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2013
A visibly relieved James D. Laboard hugged family members Thursday after jurors found the Baltimore County police officer not guilty in the death of the teenager he chased down and fought last June. Seventeen-year-old Christopher Brown had been with a group of boys who threw a rock at Laboard's door before the off-duty officer found him, and neither side in the case disputed that Brown had died as a result of the ensuing altercation. But a jury decided after a four-day trial that Laboard had not broken the law by placing the teen in the neck restraint that the state argued had killed him. The officer has not spoken publicly and did not testify.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2013
An off-duty Baltimore County police officer killed 17-year-old Christopher Brown by putting pressure on his neck, an assistant medical examiner said Wednesday as the state wrapped up its manslaughter case against James D. Laboard. Testimony on the third day of Laboard's trial largely focused on how Brown died last June in an altercation with the officer in Randallstown. An instructor at the Baltimore County Police Department said the agency considers neck holds too dangerous for officers to use, because they can cut off the flow of blood and oxygen.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2013
Baltimore County police officer James D. Laboard was playing Jenga at his Randallstown home when he heard the rock hit his door. The officer ran out and chased the teenager he saw running away, his lawyers said, touching off an altercation that led to Christopher Brown's "completely accidental" death. The account came Tuesday during Laboard's manslaughter trial, in which the defense laid out his side of the story for the first time. His attorneys said in opening statements that Brown, 17, had punched the off-duty officer and that Laboard had used his body weight in an attempt to subdue the teen.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2013
Opening statements are scheduled to begin Tuesday in the trial of a Baltimore County police officer accused in the death of a Randallstown teen last summer. A jury was selected Monday in the trial of James D. Laboard, who is accused of manslaughter in the death of Christopher Brown on June 13, 2012. The selection came after a brief motions hearing in which Laboard's lawyer said he may attempt to unseal Brown's juvenile court records. The teen died of asphyxiation. Police said the officer and Brown fought after the officer chased down the teen.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2013
Baltimore County prosecutors will not be allowed to use information provided by James D. Laboard's lawyer on the night that the off-duty police officer allegedly killed a Randallstown teenager, a judge ruled Friday. During a criminal motions hearing, Circuit Judge Jan Marshall Alexander ruled that the lawyer's decision to talk to detectives violated attorney-client confidentiality. Prosecutors said the ruling would have little effect on the case. Laboard, a Baltimore County police officer, is charged with two counts of manslaughter in the death of 17-year-old Christopher Brown.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2013
It took Chris Brown months to return to work after the death of her 17-year-old son. She has left her old home and is still hesitant to look at pictures of the teen. On Monday, a little more than a year after Christopher Brown died, the Baltimore County police officer accused of killing him is set to be tried for manslaughter. And Chris Brown will have to relive her loss through agonizing courtroom testimony. "Now I am faced with all those feelings again," said Brown, who plans to watch as prosecutors try to convict Officer James D. Laboard.
NEWS
May 11, 2003
On May 4, 2003, CHRISTOPHER BROWN, son of Gloria and Charles A. Coles Sr. Friends may call at the FAMILY OWNED MARCH FUNERAL HOME EAST, 1101 East North Avenue on Sunday after 8:30 A.M. where the family will receive friends on Monday at 11:30 A.M. Funeral Services will flollow at 12 noon. See www.marchfh.com
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2012
The trial for the Baltimore County police officer charged in the killing of a Randallstown teen scheduled for this month has been postponed until June. James D. Laboard's trial is now scheduled for June 17. A criminal motions hearing is scheduled for April 12. Laboard is now being represented by Andrew Jay Graham and John A. Bourgeois. The postponement was requested for the new counsel to prepare for the trial and to accommodate out-of-state witnesses to make the trial. Laboard, 32, who had been assigned to the Woodlawn Precinct, was charged with two counts of manslaughter in 17-year-old Christopher Brown's death.
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