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Christoph Eschenbach

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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
The Kennedy Center Concert Hall was packed Saturday night for the National Symphony Orchestra's first performance of a 1946 masterwork by Paul Hindemith, "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd. " OK, the place was packed because the first half of the program was devoted to Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto with the ever-popular, ever-youthful Joshua Bell as soloist (I'm surprised he has not yet been dubbed "The People's Violinist," a la "The People's Diva"). What counts is that the great majority of the audience remained after intermission to hear the rare and worthy Hindemith score, which he called a Requiem "For those we love.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Anton Bruckner's epic symphonies, rather like the structures of Stonehenge, continue to loom large and strange and beautiful. These products of a fierce faith do not give up their secrets easily. No wonder many listeners, in Bruckner's day and since, have walked warily away from what Brahms dismissed as "symphonic boa constrictors. " But once you let the music wrap itself tightly around you, once you start to see the carefully laid structures and feel their spirit, it's hard to let go. If you have not yet had this experience, get to the Kennedy Center to hear the National Symphony Orchestra perform Bruckner's Eighth conducted by Christoph Eschenbach ( remaining opportunities are Friday and Saturday)
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
Christoph Eschenbach has extended his contract as National Symphony Orchestra music director for two years, which keeps him on the podium through 2016-2017. That will be his seventh season.  This is his second contract extension since his tenure started in 2010. "I am very happy that management and the board agreed in a rather enthusiastic way to the extension, and same with the orchestra," Eschenbach said in a phone interview. "We are sailing the same ship, so to say, and that ship is called quality, great music-making and a passion for what we do. The orchestra has come to the point where every note they play and prepare -- and, by the way, they are always wondefully prepared -- is played for their lives and and the lives of the audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
Christoph Eschenbach has extended his contract as National Symphony Orchestra music director for two years, which keeps him on the podium through 2016-2017. That will be his seventh season.  This is his second contract extension since his tenure started in 2010. "I am very happy that management and the board agreed in a rather enthusiastic way to the extension, and same with the orchestra," Eschenbach said in a phone interview. "We are sailing the same ship, so to say, and that ship is called quality, great music-making and a passion for what we do. The orchestra has come to the point where every note they play and prepare -- and, by the way, they are always wondefully prepared -- is played for their lives and and the lives of the audience.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
The music of Paul Hindemith gets little attention in our time. This despite the fact that the German-born composer, who spent many years in the U.S. after the rise of the Third Reich, once was widely recognized as an important and influential figure. All the more reason, then, to take note of this week's National Symphony Orchestra program, which offers an especially rare performance of "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd," conducted by Christoph Eschenbach. Baritone Matthias Goerne, mezzo Michelle DeYoung and the Choral Arts Society of Washington will be featured.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
Anton Bruckner's epic symphonies, rather like the structures of Stonehenge, continue to loom large and strange and beautiful. These products of a fierce faith do not give up their secrets easily. No wonder many listeners, in Bruckner's day and since, have walked warily away from what Brahms dismissed as "symphonic boa constrictors. " But once you let the music wrap itself tightly around you, once you start to see the carefully laid structures and feel their spirit, it's hard to let go. If you have not yet had this experience, get to the Kennedy Center to hear the National Symphony Orchestra perform Bruckner's Eighth conducted by Christoph Eschenbach ( remaining opportunities are Friday and Saturday)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
Richard Strauss never lacks for attention, but the 150th anniversary of his birth this year offers a good excuse to get even more immersed in his brilliant music. The National Symphony Orchestra has gone all out honoring the composer. A couple weeks ago, there was a sizzling semi-staged version of "Der Rosenkavalier" featuring an exceptional cast. Over the weekend, there was an all-Strauss program that included more opera -- the Recognition Scene from "Elektra" and the finale to "Salome.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | October 13, 1991
Christoph Eschenbach can explain why pianists often make good conductors."They're more concerned with architecture and color than other instrumentalists," says the 51-year-old conductor, who will lead Germany's Bamberg Symphony in a Dvorak-Shostakovich program this Thursday at the Naval Academy in Annapolis. "As a pianist you are not satisfied with a 'bang-bang-bang' tone -- you want to sound like an oboe, a cello, a clarinet, a trumpet. It's wonderful preparation for the orchestra."It may be that Eschenbach's right.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2010
A recent visit to Christoph Eschenbach's office at the Kennedy Center presented a starkly contrasting image — the conductor all in black, his preferred color on and offstage, sitting on an intensely white leather sofa against white walls. Not a bad visual metaphor for the way Eschenbach is viewed in the music world. Opinions about the new, German-born music director of the National Symphony Orchestra and the first music director of the Kennedy Center (a post created for him)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | September 11, 1994
Sunday's Arts & Entertainment section incorrectly listed a performance in the schedule of the Peabody Institute's Opera Theatre and Symphony Orchestra. The groups will perform Haydn's "The Perils of Fidelity" on Nov. 18-20.The Sun regrets the error.The big musical event this season in Baltimore takes place outside Baltimore. It will be the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's first trip to Asia -- a four-week tour this October and November that will take the BSO and its music director, David Zinman, to cities in Korea, Taiwan and Japan.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
Richard Strauss never lacks for attention, but the 150th anniversary of his birth this year offers a good excuse to get even more immersed in his brilliant music. The National Symphony Orchestra has gone all out honoring the composer. A couple weeks ago, there was a sizzling semi-staged version of "Der Rosenkavalier" featuring an exceptional cast. Over the weekend, there was an all-Strauss program that included more opera -- the Recognition Scene from "Elektra" and the finale to "Salome.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
The Kennedy Center Concert Hall was packed Saturday night for the National Symphony Orchestra's first performance of a 1946 masterwork by Paul Hindemith, "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd. " OK, the place was packed because the first half of the program was devoted to Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto with the ever-popular, ever-youthful Joshua Bell as soloist (I'm surprised he has not yet been dubbed "The People's Violinist," a la "The People's Diva"). What counts is that the great majority of the audience remained after intermission to hear the rare and worthy Hindemith score, which he called a Requiem "For those we love.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
The music of Paul Hindemith gets little attention in our time. This despite the fact that the German-born composer, who spent many years in the U.S. after the rise of the Third Reich, once was widely recognized as an important and influential figure. All the more reason, then, to take note of this week's National Symphony Orchestra program, which offers an especially rare performance of "When Lilacs Last in the Dooryard Bloom'd," conducted by Christoph Eschenbach. Baritone Matthias Goerne, mezzo Michelle DeYoung and the Choral Arts Society of Washington will be featured.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2010
A recent visit to Christoph Eschenbach's office at the Kennedy Center presented a starkly contrasting image — the conductor all in black, his preferred color on and offstage, sitting on an intensely white leather sofa against white walls. Not a bad visual metaphor for the way Eschenbach is viewed in the music world. Opinions about the new, German-born music director of the National Symphony Orchestra and the first music director of the Kennedy Center (a post created for him)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | September 11, 1994
Sunday's Arts & Entertainment section incorrectly listed a performance in the schedule of the Peabody Institute's Opera Theatre and Symphony Orchestra. The groups will perform Haydn's "The Perils of Fidelity" on Nov. 18-20.The Sun regrets the error.The big musical event this season in Baltimore takes place outside Baltimore. It will be the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's first trip to Asia -- a four-week tour this October and November that will take the BSO and its music director, David Zinman, to cities in Korea, Taiwan and Japan.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | October 13, 1991
Christoph Eschenbach can explain why pianists often make good conductors."They're more concerned with architecture and color than other instrumentalists," says the 51-year-old conductor, who will lead Germany's Bamberg Symphony in a Dvorak-Shostakovich program this Thursday at the Naval Academy in Annapolis. "As a pianist you are not satisfied with a 'bang-bang-bang' tone -- you want to sound like an oboe, a cello, a clarinet, a trumpet. It's wonderful preparation for the orchestra."It may be that Eschenbach's right.
FEATURES
November 28, 2005
Tonight at 7:30, the Washington Performing Arts Society presents the Philadelphia Orchestra; Christoph Eschenbach directs; at the Kennedy Center Concert Hall, off Virginia and New Hampshire avenues N.W., Washington. Tickets are $40-$95. Call 800-444-1324.
NEWS
October 11, 1991
One of Germany's most distinguished orchestras, the Bamberg Symphony, appears at 7:30 p.m. Oct. 17, at the new Bob Hope Performing Arts Center, in Alumni Hall at the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis.The program will include Dvorak's "Carnival" Overture and "New World" Symphony and Shostakovich's Cello Concerto No. 1, with soloist Heinrich Schiff performing on his 1698 Stradivarius cello.Founded 45 years ago by refugee musicians from Prague, the orchestra will be conducted by Christoph Eschenbach.
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