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By David Colker and David Colker,Los Angeles Times | October 10, 1991
FORT TEJON, Calif. -- More than 1,700 giant yellow umbrellas fluttered open yesterday on the barren, tan slopes of the Tejon Pass 60 miles north of Los Angeles, completing one of the largest undertakings in modern art history -- the creation of twin forests of colorful canopies in California and Japan by environmental artist Christo.The strange sight produced jubilation, wisecracks, bafflement and tears of joy from about 10,000 spectators scattered through the sparsely populated hills for the highly publicized event.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 28, 2005
NEW YORK - Contrary to some reports, Jeanne-Claude's hair is a few shades darker than the Sunkist orange - er, saffron - of the million square feet of fabric hanging from The Gates in Central Park. It's more the color of carrot cake. Still, she is unmistakable in a crowd. On a stroll yesterday morning through the art project that she and her husband, Christo, designed, she could barely walk a few feet without attracting a horde of jacket-swaddled tourists. "Why are you taking pictures of me?"
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By David Colker and David Colker,Los Angeles Times | October 9, 1991
LOS ANGELES -- Christo unfurled his latest environmental artwork yesterday as a lush green countryside in Japan blossomed with 1,340 blue umbrellas, and the California portion of the project was poised to open just after dawn today.The Japan umbrellas -- each is almost 20 feet tall and weighs 488 pounds -- started opening at 5 a.m., Japan time, Wednesday. Four hours later, almost all were open."So far, the Japan umbrellas are going up without mishap," said Augie Huber, general contractor for the project, which has been six years in the making and will cost more than $26 million.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2005
What is art? is not the question. What is saffron? is the question. More than previous works of public art, Christo and Jeanne-Claude's The Gates has been open to colorful interpretation. The pleated fabric panels hanging from the 7,500 gates winding through Central Park have been described as the color of Orangeade, Home Depot signs, highway safety cones or, as The New Yorker reported this week, "something you would wear only in the woods during deer season." These observers, obviously, have not bought into the saffron designation that Christo and Jeanne-Claude have given the color and instead believe they are seeing orange.
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Berlin Bureau of The Sun | February 25, 1994
Berlin -- In his long, eccentric career of making bold visual statements to a skeptical public, the artist known as Christo has racked up some impressive accomplishments.He surrounded entire islands with collars of pink fabric in Miami's Biscayne Bay, stretched a high white fence across miles of barren California hills, cloaked a Paris bridge in cloth, and spiked Japanese rice paddies with hundreds of huge blue umbrellas.But today Christo faces perhaps his toughest challenge yet: winning over the stodgy, gray parliament, the Bundestag, to the cause of art for art's sake.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 28, 1991
LEBEC, Calif. -- Crews struggled in high winds yesterday to dismantle Christo's giant umbrellas after the artist ordered his bicontinental project to end four days early because of the death of a visitor who was crushed by an uprooted umbrella.About 7,000 disappointed spectators were met by rows of furled umbrellas, billowing like golden ghosts that disappeared into the fog shrouding the mountaintops here, about 60 miles north of Los Angeles. Hundreds of other umbrellas had been torn or toppled by wind gusts before workers could crank them shut.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Berlin Bureau | January 7, 1993
BERLIN -- Christo, the avant-garde artist who has wrapped everything from Florida islands to the Pont Neuf bridge in Paris, will launch today his last campaign to shroud the revered Reichstag parliament building here in about a million square feet of silver-colored fabric."
NEWS
By Stevenson Swanson and Stevenson Swanson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 13, 2005
NEW YORK - The drab winter landscape of Central Park came alive with undulating panels of orange fabric yesterday as teams of workers unfurled "The Gates" to the cheers of art lovers. The largest public art project in New York history, The Gates is the work of Christo and his wife, Jeanne-Claude, the artists who are on a first-name basis with fame because of previous eye-popping projects such as wrapping the Reichstag in Berlin and creating a flowing fabric fence in northern California.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Geraldine Baum and Geraldine Baum,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 23, 2005
NEW YORK - For four decades, Christo and his wife, Jeanne-Claude, have traversed the world wrapping mammoth structures, surrounding islands with fabric, filling fields with giant umbrellas, turning streets, bridges, coastlines, hills, trees - even a Volkswagen - into sculpture. And during all that time the artists were living, working, and raising their only child in a funky loft north of Canal Street in Manhattan's SoHo neighborhood. New York was always home. But while scale models of their work were exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art and there were small shows in downtown galleries here, never has anything grand of theirs appeared in their adopted city.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 29, 1995
Be patriotic. Trade in your Lexus for a Mercedes.Everyone favors cutting the waste and down-sizing gummint -- but not at the expense of jobs in Merlin!The best way to improve security at the federal courthouse through art would be to commission Christo to wrap it.A cartoon is worth a thousand words, but who wants a thousand words?
NEWS
By Stevenson Swanson and Stevenson Swanson,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | February 13, 2005
NEW YORK - The drab winter landscape of Central Park came alive with undulating panels of orange fabric yesterday as teams of workers unfurled "The Gates" to the cheers of art lovers. The largest public art project in New York history, The Gates is the work of Christo and his wife, Jeanne-Claude, the artists who are on a first-name basis with fame because of previous eye-popping projects such as wrapping the Reichstag in Berlin and creating a flowing fabric fence in northern California.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | February 12, 2005
NEW YORK - Volunteers have been racing to put the finishing touches on thousands of orange plastic crossbeams fitted with tightly furled golden fabric panels. Hotels are filling up, restaurants are offering specially prepared - and sometimes color-coordinated - dishes, tour operators are bracing for an onslaught of out-of-towners joining their bus, bike and walking tours. An army of merchandisers is poised to take their share of the $80 million windfall that the artwork is expected to generate for the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Geraldine Baum and Geraldine Baum,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 23, 2005
NEW YORK - For four decades, Christo and his wife, Jeanne-Claude, have traversed the world wrapping mammoth structures, surrounding islands with fabric, filling fields with giant umbrellas, turning streets, bridges, coastlines, hills, trees - even a Volkswagen - into sculpture. And during all that time the artists were living, working, and raising their only child in a funky loft north of Canal Street in Manhattan's SoHo neighborhood. New York was always home. But while scale models of their work were exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art and there were small shows in downtown galleries here, never has anything grand of theirs appeared in their adopted city.
NEWS
March 20, 2003
On March 18, 2003, CHRISTOS E. KOULATSOS; beloved husband ofAnastasia Koulatsos; loving father of Dennis and his wife Margo and Jerry Koulatsos; cherished grandfather of Athina, Christos, Angelo Koulatsos. The family will receive friends at 6224 Eastern Avenue, Thursday, from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9. Funeral Services will be held in St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, on Friday, at 11 A.M. Trisaghion Services on Thursday, at 7:30 P.M. Interment Oak Lawn Cemetery. Memorials in his name may be directed to the church.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 29, 1995
Be patriotic. Trade in your Lexus for a Mercedes.Everyone favors cutting the waste and down-sizing gummint -- but not at the expense of jobs in Merlin!The best way to improve security at the federal courthouse through art would be to commission Christo to wrap it.A cartoon is worth a thousand words, but who wants a thousand words?
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Knight-Ridder NewspapersBerlin Bureau of The Sun | June 20, 1995
Berlin -- When tourist Chong Su of Beijing prepared for his latest visit to Berlin, he made sure the sightseeing agenda included a stop at the gray, hulking Reichstag building. What better symbol of the city's long march through empire and infamy, he figured, than Germany's once and future parliament building, with its bullet scars and weighty architecture.But when Mr. Chong and two friends arrived yesterday at the vast lawn of the Reichstag, they were dismayed to find some sort of construction work going on.Not only was the building closed, but workers had covered the front entrance with a huge silver dropcloth, and were preparing to cover other sections as well.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 28, 2005
NEW YORK - Contrary to some reports, Jeanne-Claude's hair is a few shades darker than the Sunkist orange - er, saffron - of the million square feet of fabric hanging from The Gates in Central Park. It's more the color of carrot cake. Still, she is unmistakable in a crowd. On a stroll yesterday morning through the art project that she and her husband, Christo, designed, she could barely walk a few feet without attracting a horde of jacket-swaddled tourists. "Why are you taking pictures of me?"
FEATURES
By John E. Woodruff and John E. Woodruff,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | October 10, 1991
Between two typhoons, the rain stopped just long enough yesterday for the artist Christo to put up his umbrellas.Taking advantage of what he called a "brief window of opportunity" -- hours after one typhoon let up and before another blew in packing more days of rain -- Christo worked with construction crews and teams of elderly and teen-age volunteers at dawn to open 1,340 gigantic, royal-blue umbrellas along a 12-mile stretch of the Sato River valley, 75...
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | March 19, 1995
Q: I would like to spend a week of my vacation this year volunteering to help Christo wrap the Reichstag Building in Berlin. Who can I contact to arrange this?A: The word from Christo's office manager, Calixte Stamp, is that the artist and his wife, Jeanne-Claude, never use volunteers on their projects. Everybody who helps, she says, is paid the minimum wage or above.NTC But don't make your reservations just yet. To join the Berlin project, which will start June 17 and probably be completed around June 23, you will need to meet the following requirements:* You must have a German passport or one from another European Union country, allowing you to work in Germany.
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