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By MIKE PRESTON | December 16, 2008
I listened last week to Ravens players telling area fans not to sell their tickets to Steelers fans, and that if they did it was a lack of respect, and that those who did weren't true fans. Sometimes, players live in their own little worlds. Outside the locker room, and in the real world where we live, a lot of people are getting laid off or taking pay cuts. A lot of companies are filing for bankruptcy. So if a fan sold his tickets and made a few bucks for Christmas this year or made some extra money to pay a few bills, good for him or her. ( For more, go to baltimoresun.
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FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2012
What's purple, white and can hang on your tree's blind side? It's a Michael Oher-nament! Hallmark has just released a sneak preview of it's 2012 Keepsake Ornaments -- and the Ravens offensive tackle has made the cut. It's a first time a Raven has become an ornament -- something the Hallmark company considers and honor. "We chose Michael Oher to become a Hallmark Keepsake Ornament because of his ability on the field and the story of what he had to overcome to get there," Hallmark spokewomanm Jaci Twidwell told The Sun. "He's a great ambassador for the Ravens and is an overall good person.
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FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1998
"Hundred Dollar Holiday: The Case for a More Joyful Christmas," by Bill McKibben. Simon & Schuster. 95 pages. $12.USA Today reports that the average consumer will spend $914 on Christmas this year, $35 more than last year, and almost half of us can't remember a single gift we received.It seems that Christmas is memorable only for the money we spend, and for the time we spend spending it. Christmas has become something to be endured, not enjoyed. It is enough to make January - cold, gray and uneventful - look appealing.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | December 16, 2008
I listened last week to Ravens players telling area fans not to sell their tickets to Steelers fans, and that if they did it was a lack of respect, and that those who did weren't true fans. Sometimes, players live in their own little worlds. Outside the locker room, and in the real world where we live, a lot of people are getting laid off or taking pay cuts. A lot of companies are filing for bankruptcy. So if a fan sold his tickets and made a few bucks for Christmas this year or made some extra money to pay a few bills, good for him or her. ( For more, go to baltimoresun.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | November 28, 2004
I have a friend for whom Christmas comes but once every couple of years. She and her husband don't have kids, so he routinely volunteers to work the Christmas holiday in place of co-workers who do. In exchange, he gets Thanksgiving, and that holiday is an annual blowout for Bev and Andy and their many friends. The result has been a kind of dwindling commitment to Christmas, and all the heavy-duty decorating, cooking and baking that wears the rest of us out every year by Dec. 15. I really like the idea of a biennial Christmas, and I am thinking of adopting the idea and promoting it among friends and family.
NEWS
By David Michael Ettlin and David Michael Ettlin,Staff Writer | December 25, 1992
The region won't have a white Christmas this year -- just cold one. As if anyone leaving home yesterday morning didn't already know that.Gusts of wind between 45 and 50 mph greeted area residents venturing outside for some last-minute shopping on the day before Christmas. National Weather Service forecasters said they twice recorded gusts of 48 mph at Baltimore-Washington International Airport.WBAL employees reported a 50 mph gust on Television Hill in North Baltimore yesterday morning.The wind knocked out power to about 10,000 area homes yesterday beginning about 10 a.m. Baltimore County was hardest hit, where the lights went out in about 3,000 homes, said Peggy Mulloy, a spokeswoman for Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. All power was restored by 5 p.m.Though temperatures were in the low 30s and upper 20s yesterday afternoon, meteorologists estimated the wind-chill factor to be as low as 5 degrees yesterday.
NEWS
By Carol Bowers and Carol Bowers,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1991
Piles of puzzles, stuffed animals, mittens, dolls, trains and other toys transformed the conference room at the county Department of Social Services into a makeshift Santa's toy shop Christmas Eve.Joy Rich, director of Social Services' Neighbors in Need program, surveyedthe array of toys that remained and shook her Santa hat-covered head."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff writer | December 23, 1991
For Elaine Erwin and her two children, the Christmas party sponsoredby the Northern Anne Arundel Chamber of Commerce on Saturday was a perfect pick-me-up for what could have been a sorrowful holiday.Erwin's husband, Michael, died two months ago. Of course, Christmas this year just won't be the same. But the annual Needy Children's party helped, if only for a day, raise the family's spirits."This helps me get through the holidays," Erwin said.For 11-year-old Heather and 8-year-old Krystal, the party at Martin Spalding High School meant food and gifts and Santa and music.
NEWS
By Janet P. Zinzeleta | November 12, 1991
THE CRISPNESS in the air, the crunching of leaves underfoot, the early darkening of the sky -- these signs would be enough, even without the store decorations and unsubtle advertisements, to let us know that "the holidays" are approaching. For people who are grieving, especially if this is the first holiday time to be confronted without the presence of a loved one who has died, this is a difficult time of year.Bereavement support groups usually devote at least one session to hints on how to handle holiday depression.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | December 3, 1991
Linthicum is dressing up early for Christmas this year, and everyone's invited to see just how lovely she looks.On Sunday evening, the Woman's Club of Linthicum will sponsor its first Christmas tour, "Linthicum by Candlelight." The public is invited to tour eight privatehomes, both historic and contemporary, as well as St. John's Lutheran Church and the historic Holly Run Chapel and B & A Train Station.All are decked out for Christmas in styles as varied as the decorators and buildings themselves.
NEWS
December 18, 2005
The fog of the culture war has descended over Christmas this year. Every blogger seems to be firing salvos, though it's hard to believe that it's come to this - a bitter fight over whether uttering "happy holidays" instead of "merry Christmas" is an insult to Christians or an inclusive gesture to those of other faiths. Here's a quick look at the forces entrenched on the battlefield: True believers: "Many of the anti-Christmas Scrooges are the same people who have problems with any notion that this is the greatest nation God ever created on this earth.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | November 28, 2004
I have a friend for whom Christmas comes but once every couple of years. She and her husband don't have kids, so he routinely volunteers to work the Christmas holiday in place of co-workers who do. In exchange, he gets Thanksgiving, and that holiday is an annual blowout for Bev and Andy and their many friends. The result has been a kind of dwindling commitment to Christmas, and all the heavy-duty decorating, cooking and baking that wears the rest of us out every year by Dec. 15. I really like the idea of a biennial Christmas, and I am thinking of adopting the idea and promoting it among friends and family.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | December 14, 2003
I have celebrated every Christmas of my life in Pittsburgh. I have lived some 250 miles away for all of my grown-up years, but I have made the pilgrimage to Pittsburgh for the holidays. This is true for my children, too, who believed for years that Santa only came to Grandma's house in Pittsburgh. They have never opened their eyes in their own beds on Christmas morning, and they have never complained. All the grandparents, aunts, uncles and cousins were in Pittsburgh -- and so were all the presents.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Athima Chansanchai and Mary Gail Hare and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2002
The annual gift giveaway at St. John Roman Catholic parish in Westminster yesterday made Christmas wishes come true for more than 150 needy Carroll County families. Wrapped packages held the promise of toys, clothing and groceries. Among the gifts were bicycles, scooters, skates and video games. "My son asked for a bike, but I didn't think he would get one," said Cynthia, 42, loading a 10-speed into the trunk of her car with help from parish volunteers. "I am going to hide this somewhere and he will be so surprised."
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | December 2, 2001
It's December, but America isn't in its usual holiday mood. The spirit of our society has been changed forever by the unprovoked attack in which thousands died. The country is at war. Americans are planning a quiet holiday with family and friends, hoping for peace and grateful for their blessings. Newspapers are already running stories about what sorts of gifts are appropriate for servicemen and women who won't be home for the holidays. "War Casts Shadow Over Christmas Joy," one headline reads.
NEWS
By Neal Thompson and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | December 11, 2000
Ho, ho, hustle. It's crunch time for the Christmas crowd. With a fortnight left until Dec. 25, the Yule-fueled work force is toiling harder than an elf in the NBA. It happens in a lot of businesses, when a looming deadline heightens the intensity. Accountants' hearts race faster as the days wind down to April 15. Salespeople fret over their quotas as they near the end of a fiscal year. And for department store gift-wrappers, candy store owners, Christmas card photographers and others who profit from the holiday season, the final five or six weeks on the calendar are a frantic blur that, in the end, can make the difference between a good year and a not-so-good year.
NEWS
December 18, 2005
The fog of the culture war has descended over Christmas this year. Every blogger seems to be firing salvos, though it's hard to believe that it's come to this - a bitter fight over whether uttering "happy holidays" instead of "merry Christmas" is an insult to Christians or an inclusive gesture to those of other faiths. Here's a quick look at the forces entrenched on the battlefield: True believers: "Many of the anti-Christmas Scrooges are the same people who have problems with any notion that this is the greatest nation God ever created on this earth.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Athima Chansanchai and Mary Gail Hare and Athima Chansanchai,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2002
The annual gift giveaway at St. John Roman Catholic parish in Westminster yesterday made Christmas wishes come true for more than 150 needy Carroll County families. Wrapped packages held the promise of toys, clothing and groceries. Among the gifts were bicycles, scooters, skates and video games. "My son asked for a bike, but I didn't think he would get one," said Cynthia, 42, loading a 10-speed into the trunk of her car with help from parish volunteers. "I am going to hide this somewhere and he will be so surprised."
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1998
"Hundred Dollar Holiday: The Case for a More Joyful Christmas," by Bill McKibben. Simon & Schuster. 95 pages. $12.USA Today reports that the average consumer will spend $914 on Christmas this year, $35 more than last year, and almost half of us can't remember a single gift we received.It seems that Christmas is memorable only for the money we spend, and for the time we spend spending it. Christmas has become something to be endured, not enjoyed. It is enough to make January - cold, gray and uneventful - look appealing.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | January 10, 1997
The final word on the critically important Christmas season came in yesterday: Retailers generally suffered through a mediocre season.Only the high-end retailers and discounters exceeded expectations, while most department stores and clothing chains saw slight increases in sales, according to figures released by retailers.Analysts saw the same numbers differently. Some said a 3 percent increase was a success, while others viewed it as a failure."This is a bonanza of a Christmas," said Alan Mill-stein of Fashion Network Report.
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