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By SUSAN REIMER | December 25, 2005
Christmas comes early for me every year, and I usually spend it alone. My own personal Christmas occurs on some quiet afternoon or late some evening when I unpack the Christmas ornaments. My forgetfulness comes in handy during this private Christmas. Each ornament gives me a rush of pleasure I don't remember feeling before. As I gently unpack them and spread them over the dining-room table, I am delighted by their familiarity. My Christmas ornaments won't be heirlooms until my grandchildren unpack them some day, but they represent to me the span of years since the first one was purchased.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
Charles B. "Charlie" Elder Jr., a retired dispatcher who enjoyed collecting Christmas ornaments, died Saturday of multiple organ failure at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Hydes resident was 44. Charles Bailey Elder Jr., who was born in Baltimore and raised in Hydes, graduated in 1986 from Dulaney High School. In his youth, he had been active in the Boy Scouts. Mr. Elder attended Widener University in Chester, Pa., and had worked for 15 years as a dispatcher in the Cockeysville office of Alarm Watch, a security company, until last year.
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FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen | December 16, 1990
There's a gem of a vintage Christmas display right in themiddle of New York's diamond district, on the second floor of that venerable writers' bookshop called the Gotham Book Mart.For the past 14 Christmases Andreas Brown, owner of the bookshop, has decorated a 12-foot fir tree with antique ornaments. (This year, some of the items on display are from the collection of a Marylander.)The tradition began in December 1977 when Phillip Snyder came to the shop to show Mr. Brown a book he had written.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2011
If Oprah Winfrey singles out just 13 items as her "favorite things" of 2011, and one of them is yours, it's safe to assume you're going to quickly become very — very — popular. So now is probably not the best time to try to reach Sherry Kendall. Ever since Winfrey raved about Kendall's Christmas ornaments featuring hand-painted pet portraits in December's O, the Oprah Magazine, visits to the Woodbine artist's website have spiked, orders are piling up and the glass balls have appeared on two national TV shows.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2012
Charles B. "Charlie" Elder Jr., a retired dispatcher who enjoyed collecting Christmas ornaments, died Saturday of multiple organ failure at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Hydes resident was 44. Charles Bailey Elder Jr., who was born in Baltimore and raised in Hydes, graduated in 1986 from Dulaney High School. In his youth, he had been active in the Boy Scouts. Mr. Elder attended Widener University in Chester, Pa., and had worked for 15 years as a dispatcher in the Cockeysville office of Alarm Watch, a security company, until last year.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | December 7, 2003
Walk into Maribou, the eclectic new home store on Falls Road, and one thing becomes clear: This is not your average Baltimore shop. And no wonder. It's owned by Palm Beacher Laura Millender, who purchases much of her stock from gift shows in California, Atlanta, New York and shops in Palm Beach. "The store has a Worth Avenue flair," she says, referring to the ritzy Palm Beach shopping district. But her prices are reasonable. Unique holiday gifts run the gamut from marabou slippers ($32)
FEATURES
By Christina Lee Knauss and Christina Lee Knauss,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 9, 1996
There is something timeless about the little town of Walterboro, S.C., on the edge of Interstate 95.Even though it serves mainly as a stopover for tourists bustling by on their way to and from Florida, Walterboro has managed to keep alive a sense of tradition. Tiny motels with bungalows instead of rooms and a 150-year-old jail shaped like a castle rub shoulders with neon-lighted video stores and fast-food restaurants.It's fitting, then, in this place where tradition and innovation mix, that a Victorian house on quiet Wichman Street serves double duty as the only active museum in South Carolina dedicated to keeping traditional crafts and folk arts alive.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | August 27, 1995
Antiques fair comes to townAntiques buffs won't want to miss the Baltimore Summer Antiques Fair next weekend. And anyone looking for unusual decorative accessories or gifts will find many small objects priced under $100.This is the 15th year for the antiques fair, to be held at the Convention Center Sept. 1-3. Dealers from 32 states as well as Canada and Europe will be showing and selling furniture, both formal and country; crystal and art glass; silver; toys; collectibles; Oriental rugs; and much more.
NEWS
December 19, 1999
Editor's note: Jerdine Nolen today writes about holiday reading selections. Her column appears biweekly.Another holiday season, another list of books to share with family and friends. These suggestions include craft and holiday titles as well as favorite authors and series for gift giving.Crafts* "Christmas Ornaments Kids Can Make" by Kathy Ross* "101 Things to do for Christmas" by Debbie Trafton O'Neal* "175 Easy-To-Do Christmas Crafts" by Sharon Dunn Umnik* "Aleene's Christmas Craft Quickies" by Heidi BorchersChristmas Books* "Addy's Surprise: A Christmas Story" by Connie Rose Porter* "Albert's Christmas" by Leslie Tryon* "All I Want for Christmas is ...: Letters from Santa's Mailbag" by Carl Anderson* "Amahl and the Night Visitors" by Gian Carlo Menotti* "The Amazing Christmas Extravaganza" by David Shannon* "An Angel Just Like Me" by Mary Hoffman* "Arthur's Christmas Cookies" by Marc Brown* "Auntie Claus" by Elise Primavera* "B is for Bethlehem: A Christmas Alphabet" by Isabel Wilner* "The Bells of Christmas" by Virginia Hamilton* "The Biggest, Best Snowman" by Margery Cuyler* "The Black Snowman" by Phil Mendez* "The Candymaker's Gift: A Legend of Candy Cane" by Helen Haidle* "Carol of the Brown King: Nativity Poems" by Langston Hughes* "Chita's Christmas Tree" by Elizabeth Fitzgerald Howard* "Christmas Adventure of Space Elf Sam" by Audrey Wood* "A Christmas Carol" by Charles Dickens* "Christmas Lights" by Ann Fearrington* "A Christmas Tree in the White House" by Gary...
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | December 26, 1998
I was snapping up half-price Christmas ornaments as the word spread around the old Stewart's department store that it would be closing in a few weeks. It was the last days of 1978, and all I could think about was bagging enough blown-glass snowmen and ice castles to replace those that had smashed when that year's tree suffered an unfortunate Christmas night plunge.It fell the morning of Dec. 26 into a shattered mess of glass and balsam needles. I consoled myself with the thought that the Stewart's sale would take some of the sting out of the situation.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER | December 25, 2005
Christmas comes early for me every year, and I usually spend it alone. My own personal Christmas occurs on some quiet afternoon or late some evening when I unpack the Christmas ornaments. My forgetfulness comes in handy during this private Christmas. Each ornament gives me a rush of pleasure I don't remember feeling before. As I gently unpack them and spread them over the dining-room table, I am delighted by their familiarity. My Christmas ornaments won't be heirlooms until my grandchildren unpack them some day, but they represent to me the span of years since the first one was purchased.
NEWS
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,Sun Staff | December 7, 2003
Walk into Maribou, the eclectic new home store on Falls Road, and one thing becomes clear: This is not your average Baltimore shop. And no wonder. It's owned by Palm Beacher Laura Millender, who purchases much of her stock from gift shows in California, Atlanta, New York and shops in Palm Beach. "The store has a Worth Avenue flair," she says, referring to the ritzy Palm Beach shopping district. But her prices are reasonable. Unique holiday gifts run the gamut from marabou slippers ($32)
NEWS
December 19, 1999
Editor's note: Jerdine Nolen today writes about holiday reading selections. Her column appears biweekly.Another holiday season, another list of books to share with family and friends. These suggestions include craft and holiday titles as well as favorite authors and series for gift giving.Crafts* "Christmas Ornaments Kids Can Make" by Kathy Ross* "101 Things to do for Christmas" by Debbie Trafton O'Neal* "175 Easy-To-Do Christmas Crafts" by Sharon Dunn Umnik* "Aleene's Christmas Craft Quickies" by Heidi BorchersChristmas Books* "Addy's Surprise: A Christmas Story" by Connie Rose Porter* "Albert's Christmas" by Leslie Tryon* "All I Want for Christmas is ...: Letters from Santa's Mailbag" by Carl Anderson* "Amahl and the Night Visitors" by Gian Carlo Menotti* "The Amazing Christmas Extravaganza" by David Shannon* "An Angel Just Like Me" by Mary Hoffman* "Arthur's Christmas Cookies" by Marc Brown* "Auntie Claus" by Elise Primavera* "B is for Bethlehem: A Christmas Alphabet" by Isabel Wilner* "The Bells of Christmas" by Virginia Hamilton* "The Biggest, Best Snowman" by Margery Cuyler* "The Black Snowman" by Phil Mendez* "The Candymaker's Gift: A Legend of Candy Cane" by Helen Haidle* "Carol of the Brown King: Nativity Poems" by Langston Hughes* "Chita's Christmas Tree" by Elizabeth Fitzgerald Howard* "Christmas Adventure of Space Elf Sam" by Audrey Wood* "A Christmas Carol" by Charles Dickens* "Christmas Lights" by Ann Fearrington* "A Christmas Tree in the White House" by Gary...
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | December 26, 1998
I was snapping up half-price Christmas ornaments as the word spread around the old Stewart's department store that it would be closing in a few weeks. It was the last days of 1978, and all I could think about was bagging enough blown-glass snowmen and ice castles to replace those that had smashed when that year's tree suffered an unfortunate Christmas night plunge.It fell the morning of Dec. 26 into a shattered mess of glass and balsam needles. I consoled myself with the thought that the Stewart's sale would take some of the sting out of the situation.
FEATURES
By Carol Sterbenz and Carol Sterbenz,Universal Press Syndicate | December 6, 1998
When F.W. Woolworth bought 200,000 glass Christmas tree ornaments from the most noted German glassblowers in 1890, he launched an America love affair with shimmer and shine.Between then and now, we've had our little flings with other styles - dressing the Christmas tree follows trends like everything else in interior design. There were the American-country and the lodge-look trees, with ornaments made from natural materials. They were rough-textured,homespun and earthy adornments - miniature twig furniture, quilted hearts and folk-art figures hung on boughs with nuts, berries and pine cones.
FEATURES
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 29, 1998
This time of year, I long to dive into a Currier and Ives print to escape the commercial clatter of the holidays. But a visit to an herb farm runs a close second in restorative benefit. Most herb farms offer not only fresh potted herbs and herbal gifts, but also classes, seminars and events to celebrate the season. Here's a sampling:An Eastridge Garden in rural Centreville sells tropical plants, herbs, herbal gifts, trees and shrubs. Proprietor Sally Foster's rosemary and ivy topiaries share space in five greenhouses with potted herb gardens and living herbal wreaths, elegant centerpieces that also add flavor to holiday meals.
NEWS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,Staff Writer | December 23, 1993
Christmas shoppers are spending and charging with abandon this year, boosting revenues for many retailers in the county over last year's holiday shopping season."
FEATURES
By Nancy Taylor Robson and Nancy Taylor Robson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 29, 1998
This time of year, I long to dive into a Currier and Ives print to escape the commercial clatter of the holidays. But a visit to an herb farm runs a close second in restorative benefit. Most herb farms offer not only fresh potted herbs and herbal gifts, but also classes, seminars and events to celebrate the season. Here's a sampling:An Eastridge Garden in rural Centreville sells tropical plants, herbs, herbal gifts, trees and shrubs. Proprietor Sally Foster's rosemary and ivy topiaries share space in five greenhouses with potted herb gardens and living herbal wreaths, elegant centerpieces that also add flavor to holiday meals.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1996
Some of the prettiest trees in Christmas shops this season are labeled Victorian. Decorated with lacy, beribboned confections in pastel colors, they are lovely to look at and reminiscent of holidays past. But such ornaments would never have appeared on a Victorian Christmas tree."They have a feminine, boudoir look," says Carolyn Flaherty, editor of Victorian Homes magazine. "Very romantic. But the Victorians were dignified. They never would have had them in their parlors."It's easy enough, though, to duplicate how the Victorians actually decorated -- without spending a lot of money.
FEATURES
By Christina Lee Knauss and Christina Lee Knauss,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 9, 1996
There is something timeless about the little town of Walterboro, S.C., on the edge of Interstate 95.Even though it serves mainly as a stopover for tourists bustling by on their way to and from Florida, Walterboro has managed to keep alive a sense of tradition. Tiny motels with bungalows instead of rooms and a 150-year-old jail shaped like a castle rub shoulders with neon-lighted video stores and fast-food restaurants.It's fitting, then, in this place where tradition and innovation mix, that a Victorian house on quiet Wichman Street serves double duty as the only active museum in South Carolina dedicated to keeping traditional crafts and folk arts alive.
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