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Christmas Music

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NEWS
December 11, 2005
First Presbyterian Church of Howard County will present a program of Christmas music at 4 p.m. today in the church sanctuary. "It's part of a tradition of the church to have a music program and welcome the community to join with us," said church member Robert Hutchins. "Music is a strong tradition at First Presbyterian." The program will include performances of a broad range of Christmas music, including works by Handel and Verdi, and traditional carols by the Chancel Choir, Handbell Choir, the church's organist and other instrumentalists, directed by Jimmy Galdieri, the organist and choir director.
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NEWS
December 6, 2013
Lonely? Holiday blues? Friendship United Methodist Church will host a "Blue Christmas" service at 5 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 8, at 22 West Friendship Road. Anyone who is having or has had a sad, dark or difficult Christmas is welcome. Come as you are. Information: 410-257-7133 or friendshipmethodistchurch.org. The church will hold Christmas Eve services at 6 p.m., 8:30 p.m. and 11 p.m. Christmas dinner and music The Lutheran Church of Our Redeemer plans a Christmas dinner at 5 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 15, at 7606 Quarterfield Road in Glen Burnie.
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NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | December 22, 1993
Any time something concerning Christmas is banned or challenged, it's almost a cinch news story.But in that regard, this has been a quiet season. I haven't read of even one nativity scene in a public building causing hysteria at the ACLU.The biggest story has been the court battle between the Arkansas businessman who strings a million lights on his mansion, and his irate neighbors.So my ears perked up when a woman caller, from a Chicago suburb, shouted into my ear: "They have outlawed Christmas music at Oak Park High School.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2012
Waiting at Patient First this morning for my bronchitis to be diagnosed, I was trapped in an examining room listening to Christmas music. There was also a small child in a nearby room screaming in pain and panic, and that helped me to understand what Mary and Joseph must have thought about that kid with his damn drum.* Withal, I arrived at a fresh understanding of the importance of this music. That "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town" prefigures the surveillance state has long been understood, but I had not had much occasion to reflect on the lyrics to "Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | December 16, 2007
Sometime between Halloween and Thanksgiving, we break out our Christmas CDs. Our children would request Christmas music early in the season when they were little, and now we think it is perfectly normal to hear Bing Crosby crooning "White Christmas" on the morning of Nov. 1. Sure, it's a little odd to be out in your yard, raking fall leaves to Julie Andrews' "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing" in your earphones. But we're used to it. Fortunately, we have quite a variety of music - Tchaikovsky, Mannheim Steamroller, the Vienna Boys' Choir, 'N Sync, Martina McBride, Ken Navarro, even the opera Amahl and the Night Visitors - so it never becomes tiresome.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 30, 2004
Being under constant assault from Christmas music in public spaces and on the airwaves sooner and sooner each year - eventually, we'll be hearing carols right after Labor Day - is enough to stir up the inner Scrooge in anyone. I've found myself listening - truly listening - to less and less of holiday fare in recent years. Other than Barbra Streisand's first Christmas album from the 1960s (the more recent one is a pale sequel), I usually didn't even bother to slip seasonal discs into the CD player.
FEATURES
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 16, 1999
The concluding "Amen" from George Frederick Handel's "Messiah" has seldom sounded jauntier than it did Monday night when conductor Edward Polochick put 60 singers from the Baltimore Symphony Chorus through their paces in preparation for this weekend's performances of Handel's greatest oratorio."
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | December 16, 2002
AT THIS TIME of year, the world is divided into two camps: those who like Christmas music and those who listen to the Bing Crosby-David Bowie version of "The Little Drummer Boy" and begin tearing at their skin. But for those who like Christmas songs - I mean really, really like them - radio station 101.9 Lite FM has been playing Christmas songs nonstop since Thanksgiving. By nonstop, I mean 24 hours a day, seven days a week. And this will continue all the way up to midnight on Christmas Day - unless all of us get together and do something to stop this madness.
FEATURES
December 6, 2006
Concert Aiken performs Christmas music Clay Aiken, a favorite from American Idol, will perform a Christmas show at 8 p.m. today at the Lyric Opera House, 140 W. Mount Royal Ave. Tickets are $50-$65. Information: go to ticketmaster.com or call 410-547-SEAT.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler | December 12, 1996
Christmas music celebrates the story of a man from Galilei. What better name, therefore, for a chamber music group specializing in the performance of music of the Christmas season than Ensemble Galilei?The musicians of this felicitously named group actually do much more than perform Christmas music. The specialty of Ensemble Galilei -- which features Erin Shrader on guitar and fiddle, Sue Richards on Celtic harp, Carolyn Surrick on viola da gamba, Sarah Weiner on oboe and Marcia Diehl on bowed psaltery, recorders and penny whistle -- is actually music of the Renaissance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | November 16, 2012
I always go a little crazy this time of year. Yes, I am one of those annoying people who listen nonstop to Christmas music on Sirius each season. I start shopping for gifts before Halloween, and one of the highlights of October is choosing a color scheme for the year's wrapping paper. I know it's compulsive, but I like assigning each family member a different print because I am also a wrap-as-you-buy person, and it helps me make sure the kids have about the same number of gifts. (Not that, at 22 and 19, they are even really kids any more, or care how many presents they get. But still.)
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2011
Toby's Dinner Theatre of Columbia is offering what has become a seasonal favorite — Irving Berlin's "White Christmas, The Musical" in evening and matinee performances through Jan. 8. Not just another holiday show, "White Christmas, The Musical" is also a celebration of the American popular song as defined by its prolific composer Irving Berlin. The show gives us with such favorites as "Blue Skies," "I Love a Piano," and "How Deep is the Ocean," along with introducing lesser-known Berlin tunes.
NEWS
By Barbara Curtis | December 21, 2008
BLUEMONT, Va. - The holidays are here, which means public school teachers across America are presenting "winter programs" with music selected to challenge students and delight parents - but too often sacrificing artistic merit to avoid singing of the Bethlehem Babe. One program I attended featured songs about Santa, chimneys, and reindeer, plus five Hanukkah tunes and one Kwanzaa melody, even though the school had only one (nonpracticing) Jewish family, and not a single African-American.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | December 16, 2007
Sometime between Halloween and Thanksgiving, we break out our Christmas CDs. Our children would request Christmas music early in the season when they were little, and now we think it is perfectly normal to hear Bing Crosby crooning "White Christmas" on the morning of Nov. 1. Sure, it's a little odd to be out in your yard, raking fall leaves to Julie Andrews' "Hark! The Herald Angels Sing" in your earphones. But we're used to it. Fortunately, we have quite a variety of music - Tchaikovsky, Mannheim Steamroller, the Vienna Boys' Choir, 'N Sync, Martina McBride, Ken Navarro, even the opera Amahl and the Night Visitors - so it never becomes tiresome.
NEWS
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,Sun Reporter | December 9, 2007
This is the season of peace and joy and good will toward men, yet it's also a time when we experience the dark side of the holidays: bad Christmas music. You hear it in malls, airports, supermarkets, elevators and restaurants. You hear it at office parties and holiday get-togethers, and no amount of spiked eggnog can blot it from your consciousness. It unnerves you. It drains you. You want to run away. Even songs that once lifted your spirits have been bastardized by Muzak and techno-pop influences.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Eils Lotozo and Eils Lotozo,Knight Ridder / Tribune | December 23, 2001
No one loves Christmas music quite like Ronald Clancy loves Christmas music. Clancy's passion, in fact, for the carols and songs of the season moved him to launch a wildly ambitious self-publishing venture out of his tiny Jersey Shore home. The first two of Clancy's lavishly illustrated histories, Best-Loved Christmas Carols and American Christmas Classics, boxed with CDs, are already on the market. And he's got seven more written, among them Christmas Carols From the British Isles and German Christmas Music.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2012
Waiting at Patient First this morning for my bronchitis to be diagnosed, I was trapped in an examining room listening to Christmas music. There was also a small child in a nearby room screaming in pain and panic, and that helped me to understand what Mary and Joseph must have thought about that kid with his damn drum.* Withal, I arrived at a fresh understanding of the importance of this music. That "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town" prefigures the surveillance state has long been understood, but I had not had much occasion to reflect on the lyrics to "Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer.
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