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By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | December 10, 2008
For some of us, it is not Christmas morning without a tangerine in our stocking. The trouble is that nowadays choosing seasonal citrus, like many parts of the holiday, has become more complicated. In addition to the traditional tangerine, with its seeds and pulp, there are orange orbs called clementines, grown both overseas and in the U.S.A., plus a variety of tangerine, the Satsuma, that does not have seeds. What is a kid, or a fogey like me, supposed to peel and enjoy on the big day?
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NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | December 25, 2012
More than two dozen accidents Tuesday morning in the Baltimore area sent at least two people to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center and closed parts of slick area highways, and the National Weather Service was predicting that Wednesday could bring second morning affected by a wintry mix. Maryland State Police Sgt. C. Kess blamed "icy road conditions" from Christmas Eve snow, ice and rain for 28 accidents between 5:55 a.m. and 11:20 a.m.. Accidents occurred on I-70, I-95, I-83, I-795 and I-695, he said.
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FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | December 18, 2006
It began as a typical Christmas morning eight years ago, two kids in pajamas opening presents. Brandon Kuzma, who had received a pogo stick the year before, was expecting a skateboard. But as the 9-year-old peeled the gold wrapping paper from his parents' gift, he knew what his heart really wanted. ... "Nintendo 64! ... Oh, my God!" Brandon's screams and the repeated bellows of "Thank you" from Rachel, his 6-year-old sister, resounded in at least a minute of unmitigated joy that their father Tom captured on home video - not unlike scenes filmed in millions of homes on Christmas morning.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2012
Like preachers across the country preparing for Christmas services today, William Lori has grappled with the question of how to celebrate the joy of the day so soon after the devastation of Newtown. But for Baltimore's new archbishop, the challenge also is "rather personal. " Before his arrival here in May, Lori served for 11 years as bishop of Bridgeport, Conn. The diocese includes the quiet, leafy suburb of Newtown, where on Dec. 14 a gunman forced his way into an elementary school and shot 20 first graders and six educators to death.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1996
A group of men, women and children sang the old familiar Christmas carols through Uniontown on Saturday evening, walking in the footsteps of three generations of community carolers.It is at least 65 years since a Methodist church pastor first led singers through the community of 19th- and early 20th-century homes that occupies a mile-long stretch of Uniontown Road west of Westminster.The yuletide tradition has been uninterrupted for 27 years.The tradition began with the late Rev. John Hoch, who led community caroling early on Christmas morning.
NEWS
June 26, 2012
Regarding your recent editorial on police and firefighter giveaways ("The 0 percent solution," June 25) that included your observation, "But that's what happens when freebies from so many sources are constantly left at their doorstep; the recipients come to expect them, like a spoiled child tearing through gifts on Christmas morning," I can only add this: Who says support for entitlement reform isn't alive and well at The Sun? Steve Timmons, Columbia
NEWS
By JULIE ROTHMAN and JULIE ROTHMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 14, 2005
Patricia Anderson of White Hall was looking for a good recipe for a stollen loaf. Virginia Anderson from Bella Vista, Ark., sent in a recipe that she likes for the traditional Christmas bread that she found in a church cookbook. The recipe is somewhat time-consuming in that you must allow for rising time, but if you are comfortable with yeast breads it is not overly difficult. It would certainly be just the thing to serve the family on Christmas morning. s Taste section were calculated by registered dietitian Jodie Shield, except where noted.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | December 9, 2001
At this time of year, you are supposed to practice old traditions, not pick up new ones. Yet I am tempted by the idea of serving chocolate soup on Christmas morning. I got the idea from Lidia Bastianich, who is the author of several cookbooks, including Lidia's Italian-American Kitchen, which was published last month by Knopf and contains many recipes used on her similarly named public television cooking series. She also is co-owner of three restaurants in New York -- Felidia, Becco and Esca -- as well as restaurants in Kansas City and Pittsburgh.
NEWS
By Peggy Rowe | December 23, 2010
In our house, Christmas revolved around three people: Jesus, Santa Claus, and my mother — not necessarily in that order. At no other season of the year were my efficient mother's micro-managing skills more in evidence: from the melt-in-our-mouth sugar cookies to our hand-smocked holiday dresses to the tree in the living room, perfectly shaped and decorated. Every gift beneath the tree was selected and bought by my mother. Even the gifts my father and sister and I gave to her, she had purchased.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Staff | December 10, 2000
We all know the arguments for cutting back this time of year. Of course we want to de-stress our lives and emphasize the spiritual side of the holidays. But have we gone too far? Maybe we don't need to simplify Christmas anymore. Maybe this year we ought to think about having a more, not less, elaborate Christmas -- without spending a ton of money. The problem with cutting back is that we're sometimes eliminating our rituals and traditions, those things that connect us to our past and create memories for our children.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | December 24, 2012
There is a most magical hour every Christmas season, and it is not the stroke of midnight on Christmas Eve, when the darkened church glows with candles in anticipation of a child's birth. It is not dawn on Christmas morning, when excited children wake their parents so they can see what Santa has left under the tree. And it is not that moment on Christmas night, as in "A Christmas Story," when parents tuck the exhausted children into bed and then sip a quiet glass of wine by a dying fire.
NEWS
December 24, 2012
Christmas is a holiday of peace and joy, and most of all a time of wonder and innocence for children. It is a time of belief in magic and goodness, a day when small wishes come true. This year, in particular, we need reminding of that fact. It has been less than two weeks since a town in Connecticut was rent by unspeakable horror, an event so terrible that it spread sadness in the hearts of men, women, boys and girls across the globe. In the face of such profound grief, it feels difficult, even unseemly, to remember that miracles occur at Christmas.
NEWS
June 26, 2012
Regarding your recent editorial on police and firefighter giveaways ("The 0 percent solution," June 25) that included your observation, "But that's what happens when freebies from so many sources are constantly left at their doorstep; the recipients come to expect them, like a spoiled child tearing through gifts on Christmas morning," I can only add this: Who says support for entitlement reform isn't alive and well at The Sun? Steve Timmons, Columbia
NEWS
By Leah Speer | December 1, 2011
Everyone has hopes and dreams for their families. I thought I'd planned everything out perfectly. Up until recently, I thought I'd played by the rules. So how did this middle-class, college-educated, gracious woman go from a comfortable life in a cozy two-story house to a stressful, paycheck-to-paycheck life in an apartment? It didn't seem fair. I know - life isn't always fair. But I fancied that statement more when it didn't apply to my life. Don't get me wrong, I understand the mechanics of it. My husband and I went from two incomes to one when we went from one child to two in less than two years.
NEWS
By Peggy Rowe | December 23, 2010
In our house, Christmas revolved around three people: Jesus, Santa Claus, and my mother — not necessarily in that order. At no other season of the year were my efficient mother's micro-managing skills more in evidence: from the melt-in-our-mouth sugar cookies to our hand-smocked holiday dresses to the tree in the living room, perfectly shaped and decorated. Every gift beneath the tree was selected and bought by my mother. Even the gifts my father and sister and I gave to her, she had purchased.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | December 10, 2008
For some of us, it is not Christmas morning without a tangerine in our stocking. The trouble is that nowadays choosing seasonal citrus, like many parts of the holiday, has become more complicated. In addition to the traditional tangerine, with its seeds and pulp, there are orange orbs called clementines, grown both overseas and in the U.S.A., plus a variety of tangerine, the Satsuma, that does not have seeds. What is a kid, or a fogey like me, supposed to peel and enjoy on the big day?
NEWS
By TIM BAKER | December 13, 1993
My children will be at home on Christmas morning. They're growing up, but they still bound down the stairs and exclaim about the presents spread under the tree. Christmas carols play. Lights glow. We all eat breakfast in the dining room. Then we sit in front of the fire and open our stockings together.My children have always been home with us on Christmas morning. They've been happy and healthy. We count our blessings.Some children won't be home. They'll spend the holidays in the )) hospital.
NEWS
By KEVIN COWHERD | December 1, 2008
Here's today's consumer question: Didn't Lexus get the memo about the recession we're in? Don't they read the newspapers or watch cable news at corporate headquarters? I ask this because the luxury car company just trotted out two new commercials for its annual "December to Remember" ad campaign. And these new spots might be even more pretentious and elitist than all the others. You know how these "December to Remember" commercials go. Generally they involve one spouse surprising the other Christmas morning with an over-the-top gift: a brand new Lexus with a big red bow on top. This usually takes place in the driveway of a sprawling home in a pricey neighborhood, with one spouse gasping in astonishment at his or her good fortune and the other wearing a smug, hey-it's-only-money look.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | December 24, 2006
'Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house Not a creature was stirring, not even a mouse; The stockings were hung by the chimney with care, In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there. Clement Moore wrote these words to begin his poem "A Visit From St. Nicholas," which he penned to entertain his children on Christmas Eve. But long before the poem was written, families from cultures all over the world have tapped into legends and customs of their native countries and towns during the holiday season.
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