Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChristmas Garden
IN THE NEWS

Christmas Garden

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Celeste Schimunek Breitenbach | December 20, 1990
WHEN I WAS a little girl in the 1940s before the days of television, our family would gather around the kitchen table every evening after dinner in the weeks preceding Christmas.Momma would spread an oilcloth to protect the wooden table, and Daddy would bring out all the materials needed to build houses for our Christmas garden.Each of us played a special part in the construction. Daddy would design the buildings and cut the balsa strips. Then he would glue them into a frame held tight with straight pins.
ARTICLES BY DATE
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | December 4, 2012
Kaitlyn Hughes had no trouble picking out her favorite in the Arbutus Volunteer Fire Department's 19th annual train garden display. The 12-year-old, who came with her cousins, liked the autumn scene the best. "I like it because I like fall," said Kaitlyn, of Edgewood, as she watched the trains circle the various scenes. "It's my favorite time of year. " She was baffled by the dinosaur sitting in the scene, however, as were Vanessa and Allison Carroll, of Halethorpe. "We're not sure about about the the dinosaurs," admitted Vanessa, who was visiting for the first time before getting a Christmas tree from the parking lot. "It's nice.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro | December 17, 1994
Here is a partial list of area Christmas train gardens. Unless otherwise noted, admission is free but donations are accepted.In Dundalk, the Wise Avenue Volunteer Fire Company will be open from noon to 9 p.m. through Jan. 1. Closed Christmas; open from 6 to 9 p.m. from Jan. 2 through Jan. 8. 214 Wise Ave. Call (410) 288-0710The Baltimore City Fire Department Christmas Garden will be open to the public from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. tomorrow through Jan. 7. Engine 45 Fire House, Cross Country Boulevard and Glen Avenue, Mount Washington.
NEWS
By Peggy Rowe | December 23, 2010
In our house, Christmas revolved around three people: Jesus, Santa Claus, and my mother — not necessarily in that order. At no other season of the year were my efficient mother's micro-managing skills more in evidence: from the melt-in-our-mouth sugar cookies to our hand-smocked holiday dresses to the tree in the living room, perfectly shaped and decorated. Every gift beneath the tree was selected and bought by my mother. Even the gifts my father and sister and I gave to her, she had purchased.
FEATURES
By Holton Brown | December 7, 1990
It's the season for Christmas gardens, throughout the metropolitan area and in other parts of the state.In times past, nearly every fire station had some sort of Christmas garden display for children young and old. But with the high level of fire-alarm responses and the lack of community support, the tradition of Christmas gardens in firehouses has nearly vanished.There are, however, at least six firehouse Christmas gardens around Maryland this year.*The Baltimore City Fire Department Christmas Garden will be open to the public from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. tomorrow through Jan. 6 at the Engine 45 Fire House, Cross Country Boulevard and Glen Avenue, Mount Washington.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | December 23, 1993
People who are not versed in the peculiar ways of Baltimore sometimes think a Christmas garden has something to do with a Christmas cactus.Guess again.Baltimore's wonderful gardens that bloom only around Dec. 25 are really the miniature railway villages that fill local fire houses, basements and family rooms.And there is no more traditional Baltimore Christmas aroma than the scent of a balsam fir intermixed with imitation smoke spewing from an O-gauge toy steam locomotive.And what carol is as evocative as the din produced by the wheels and motors of three electric trains hurtling along a figure-eight of track?
NEWS
December 12, 1991
The Riviera Beach Fire Company will hold an open house for its annual Christmas Garden display weekends from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Nov. 30 through Jan. 4, and weeknights from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., Dec. 16 through Jan. 3, at the firehouse, 8506 Fort Smallwood Road.The garden will be closed Christmas Day. For information, call 255-3636.
NEWS
December 6, 1995
It's another holiday season, and throughout the metropolitan area and in other parts of the state, it's Christmas garden time.In years past, nearly every firehouse had some sort of Christmas garden display to treat children, young and old.But firefighters say that with the high level of fire alarm responses and lack of support from the community, the tradition of Christmas gardens in firehouses has nearly vanished.There are, however, at least five firehouse Christmas gardens in the metropolitan area to visit during the holidays.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Evening Sun Staff | December 28, 1990
At first, there was some debate at Baltimore's Glen Avenue fire station about how to incorporate Operation Desert Shield into the station's annual Christmas garden."
FEATURES
By Jacques Kelly | December 28, 1997
IT'S ONLY IN THE PERIOD after Dec. 25 that I can unwind. I enjoy these short days and long nights when the house is clean and cozy and the doorbell doesn't stop ringing.Friends and neighbors show up on my porch because they know that by now the Christmas garden is ready for lookers. After all, it takes a goodly chunk of the fall to make all those little toy trains and streetcars run on schedule. And there are plenty of street lamps to burn out. And what was a green pastoral scene of farm and field last year is in the winter of 1997 an icy white ski slope.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | December 17, 2010
Have I ever encountered a Baltimore Christmas garden I didn't like? As a child, I spent my late Decembers going from one city fire company to another, from one neighbor's basement to the next, from hobby shop to sporting goods store, oohing and aahing at all those villages surrounded by all those trains. There were no favorites. They were all hits, even the bad ones. As deluxe as department store displays were, the gardens built by firefighters in real neighborhood firehouses had the benefit of authentic atmosphere.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | February 25, 2009
Milton R. Jones, a retired workers' compensation attorney and former volunteer firefighter who enjoyed collecting vintage electric trains and toys, died Saturday of pneumonia at Lorien Mays Chapel Health Care Center. He was 89. Mr. Jones was born in Baltimore and raised on West North Avenue. After graduating from Forest Park High School in 1941, he entered the Coast Guard, where he served for a year before being honorably discharged. He then went to work in Baltimore for the Pennsylvania Railroad as an accident and claims investigator, investigating injuries to rail workers.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,Sun reporter | January 18, 2008
Charles Leslie "Les" Harris, a teacher and artist who spent several decades building Amaranthine Museum, a sprawling display of his work housed in a Woodberry industrial building, died at his Bolton Hill home Monday. He was 84. Citing their Christian Science beliefs, family members declined to disclose the medical cause of his death. Born in Baltimore and raised on Hickory Avenue, he attended City College and became a welder at local shipyards. During World War II, he served as an Army communications specialist and saw action in the Battle of the Bulge.
NEWS
By NICK SHIELDS and NICK SHIELDS,SUN REPORTER | January 8, 2006
With his grandfather's arms wrapped snug across his waist, Devin Ennis leaned over the wooden rail, eager to capture a glimpse of the model trains moving around the miniature city. "I love Thomas!" the 4-year-old boy said, as a tiny version of the well-known tank engine rattled through the Christmas garden at the Wise Avenue Volunteer Fire Company one night last week. It was Devin's fourth visit of the season, and his mother was saddened by word that the train garden, a Dundalk holiday staple for a quarter-century, was coming to the end of the line.
FEATURES
By JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI and JON TRAUNFELD AND ELLEN NIBALI,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 7, 2006
I want to know the basic care for a Christmas amaryllis so it will bloom next year. Continue to water, place in lighted area, and let it grow through the summer inside or outside, fertilizing every two weeks to increase bulb strength. There are two schools of thought after that. Continue to grow uninterrupted indoors. The plant may lose its leaves but will sprout up and re-bloom around Valentine's Day or Easter. Or, place it in a cool, dark place in the fall and reduce water for two to three months to simulate a dormant period, then take it out and grow as usual.
NEWS
December 25, 2005
1933: firehouse Christmas garden In Ellicott City, where the railroad is part of the community's heritage, a visitor to the local fire station in 1933 could see, for a brief time, an example of another Baltimore-area tradition. That year, the fire company created an elaborate Christmas garden featuring model trains in a complex layout - complete with a miniature dirigible hovering above. "Because of the Depression, the men had spare time to build the garden," said local historian Joetta M. Cramm.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | December 13, 2003
WHILE IN the dentist's chair this week, I eavesdropped on the patient in the next cubicle who was chattering away about her family. This being Baltimore, and the pair of us living here forever, I knew every name she dropped. Not only did I recognize them, but her family members attended schools with my mother, father, uncle and two cousins. I don't think there comes a day when Baltimore doesn't reassert itself as the small town it is. But there are times when this city drives me crazy.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow | December 7, 1991
When Roland F. F. Roehner was growing up in Hamilton, the middle room of his house was off limits from about Thanksgiving to Christmas Eve. The door was locked from inside, with a key in the slot to block a curious child from peeping. But most nights a light shone under the door until the late hours."I was always told my father was working in there with Santa," recalls Mr. Roehner, who is 66.Finally on Christmas Eve, after the family meal, his mother, Esther, would stand by the locked door to blow a German-made plastic horn, the traditional shofar of the ancient Israelites that signals devotion to God.Only then were revealed the annual additions to August W. Roehner's intricate mechanical Christmas garden, recalls his son. A traditional nativity scene on one table and a Santa's workshop display on another were encircled at their bases by Lionel electric trains.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | December 24, 2005
At Christmas 1944, World War II Sunpapers correspondent Lee McCardell found himself reporting the largest land battle of World War II, when 25 German divisions attacked six U.S. divisions. The furious battle for the Ardennes, the last great German thrust against Allied forces, exploded along the Belgian border early in December and was fought during one of the worst European winters in memory. On Dec. 23, McCardell's thoughts traveled some 3,000 miles across the Atlantic to his family on Wilmslow Road in Roland Park, warm and safe from the horrors of war. It had been three years since he had left Baltimore, and as the war ground on, he was assigned to cover Gen. George S. Patton's 3rd Army.
NEWS
October 5, 2005
Donald David Darrah Sr., a retired mechanic and volunteer, died of vascular disease Saturday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Timonium resident was 81. Mr. Darrah was born in Baltimore and raised on Cottage Avenue. He attended Forest Park High School and graduated in 1933 from Franklin Day School at the old downtown YMCA. During the 1930s, Mr. Darrah sold coal and wood ranges and later was an expediter for Bartlett-Hayward Co. before joining the Navy in 1942. He served in the Pacific as chief petty officer aboard the aircraft carrier USS Santee.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.