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Christmas Decorations

FEATURES
By Dylan Landis and Dylan Landis,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | December 15, 1996
Shiny green paper, corpulent red bows: It's an unwritten law that poinsettias must be garishly dressed for Christmas. Indeed, this over-wrapped plant is so intrusively cheerful -- the botanical equivalent of a shopping-mall Santa -- that it looks perennially fake.And that's the real problem with Christmas, according to Tom Pritchard and Billy Jarecki, who own the Pure Madderlake flower shop in New York. It's not too commercial, they say. It's too unnatural. If we could get through December without foil, without plastic, without phony frost and "bizarrely blinking trees," they suggest, we might actually touch the heart of the holiday.
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NEWS
By Christy Kruhm and Christy Kruhm,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 29, 1995
THE WEEK between Christmas and New Year seems like an unusually long week. The festivities of the long-awaited, and much anticipated, Christmas Day are behind us, and the seven-day countdown to the new year looms.For parents especially, this week can be a challenge. Even though the kids have probably just received more new toys than any one child should, parents will still hear the echoes of "What are we going to do now?" throughout the house.Thoughts during this time turn to the year ahead and what it holds for us, and it's refreshing to finally have the time to sit down and reflect on the holiday just past.
FEATURES
By Carol Bidwell and Carol Bidwell,LOS ANGELES DAILY NEWS | December 24, 1995
For most of us, Santa Claus -- like Christmas -- comes but once a year.But kids who venture with their parents into the San Bernardino Mountains can see Santa almost every day of the year.Santa's Village is open nine months of the year, but takes on particular magic after a winter snowfall, said Rae Mullen, who has run the village's doll shop for the past six years."The snow piles up and the kids love to play in it," Ms. Mullen said. "The colder, the nastier, the more people like it."That's not to say visitors need cold and snow to enjoy themselves.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra CrockettMike Giuliano and Sandra CrockettMike Giuliano,SUN STAFFSPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 21, 1995
Has the Christmas spirit hit yet? If not, here's one way to get it. How about taking a leisurely drive around town and country and checking out the wondrous Christmas lights and decorations? For the third year, The Sun accepted nominations for interesting displays. The following is only a sample of the calls. Some are repeats you may have missed in previous years and want to catch this time around.Remember, it's a wise idea to have one person navigate with a map and flashlight while someone else drives.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1995
An almost-forgotten Christmas decoration that hit it big just after World War II is once again taking its place of honor on Christmas trees, showering their limbs in the vivid and translucent colors usually reserved for summertime snowball syrup.Using flashlights, toll-free phone numbers and shoe leather, a small but zealous band of Baby Boom collectors seeks out surviving examples of this once-commonplace Bubble Lite, an effervescent lighting tube filled with liquid.These connoisseurs savor the bubbling action as if it were the season's finest electrical champagne.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Amy L. Miller and Donna R. Engle and Amy L. Miller,SUN STAFF | November 30, 1995
Buyers carted away the EnterTRAINment Line piece by piece yesterday, as everything from furniture to dinnerware and crock pots to rail cars became the bargain-rate spoils of a court-ordered auction of the bankrupt company's assets.The Union Bridge excursion line closed in May, leaving more than 100 creditors and owing more than $300,000 in amusement taxes and interest dating to 1989.Despite yesterday's auction, some feel a new passenger entertainment train service could rise from the EnterTRAINment Line's ashes in Carroll County.
NEWS
By Phyllis Flowers and Phyllis Lucas and Phyllis Flowers and Phyllis Lucas,Special to the Sun | October 23, 1995
AUTUMN FEST! Autumn Fest! Autumn Fest! The United Methodist Women of Brooklyn Heights United Methodist Church will sponsor an Autumn Fest from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday at the church, 110 Townsend Ave.Come browse through the tables of homemade crafts, Christmas decorations, jewelry, jellies and jams, household items and recycled children's clothes.Lunch will be offered at 11 a.m. Be sure to enjoy the homemade soups and breads, sandwiches, hot dogs, cakes and pies. Mark this day on your calendar now for a delicious lunch and enjoyable shopping experience.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | December 25, 1994
You remembered to put the turkey in the oven at the right time, and the silver is polished. But did you give any thought to decorating your table for the Christmas feast?It's too late to go out and buy anything, but here are some last-minute ideas from Decorator's Insider, an interior design newsletter.* Use collections to dress up your table: candlesticks of all sorts and shapes, or figurines arranged on a mirror.* A container like a small antique toy wagon or an interesting old basket filled with small, brightly wrapped packages makes an engaging centerpiece.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | December 9, 1994
If you are going to Joseph Russo's house in the evening, he'll leave the lights on for you -- all 25,000 of them.Each year, Mr. Russo lights up his Pasadena neighborhood with brightly colored Christmas decorations on his lawn, roof, trees and driveway.From a wooden display of Santa's Workshop in which jolly old Saint Nicholas waves and an elf paints a toy, to the comparatively tame Nativity scene, Mr. Russo's decorations are the holiday hub of his neighborhood."You've got to get the Christmas spirit when you live across the street from him," says Janice Hastings, one of his neighbors.
NEWS
By PEG ADAMARCZYK | November 18, 1994
"Thanksgiving is next week," she bellowed as she barged in the back door. "That means Christmas. Shopping and money. Cookies and money. Cleaning and money. Money and money!"I calmly directed my distraught friend into the nearest chair and offered a soothing cup of tea and a heavy dose of empathy.Not wanting to admit that I, too, had been caught unprepared again this year, I let her ramble."Where have I been?" she asked. "I distinctly remember getting back-to-school stuff, but then it gets a little hazy."
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