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Christmas Decorations

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NEWS
October 14, 1998
Sykesville is planning for Christmas with a $7,500 expenditure for outdoor lights and decorations.The Town Council voted unanimously Monday to spend the money to decorate Main Street for the holiday season."
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NEWS
December 4, 2013
From the pages of the Aegis 50 of years ago this week. The Northeastern Expressway was expected to be renamed Dec. 11, 1963 to honor the late President John F. Kennedy. The State Roads Commission agreed to rename the expressway for the slain president, pending the family's approval, which was expected to be given. The opening of the highway on Nov.14, 1963 was the last public works project to be dedicated by the president, just eight days before his assassination. The 53 mile section was the last stretch of limited access road between Boston and Washington to be opened on the new Interstate.
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NEWS
By Ed McDonough and Ed McDonough,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 2, 1998
BEFORE THE HOLIDAY decorations come down -- I saw one denuded tree at curbside two days after Christmas -- let's honor the folks who brightened up New Windsor with sparkling Christmas displays. Three of the six winners were clustered on ++ High Street.Ronnie and Barbara Blacksten at 306 High St. had the best overall display, while Dale and Judi Gray at 311 had the best door display. Robert and Diane Dixon had the second-best door display.Rounding out the door display competition were James and Helen Carlisle on Church Street.
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2012
My baby boy is about to turn 1. The where-is-time-going panic that is inducing is a post for another day, but I'm starting to wonder, as he gets older, how do we differentiate his birthday celebration from the holiday celebrations? Aaron was due on Christmas Day, and I heard from many December babies how much they disliked having their birthdays wrapped up with the holidays (so to speak). I was terrified I'd go into labor on Christmas Eve or Christmas Day since my husband was in Afghanistan and my older son was understanding Christmas for the first time.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | January 15, 1994
David Hopkins kept his Christmas tree up for 13 months. He meant to remove the artificial tree from its perch in his Rossville club basement last January. But then he and his girlfriend, Denise Debes, got busy rearranging furniture in their home, and they never got around to taking the tree down."And once it got to May and June . . . we figured we were halfway to Christmas, so we just left it up," Hopkins said.Evelyna Valentine had her tree out the door Dec. 27. She always takes her tree down a few days before New Year's Day because she believes nothing "old," including Christmas decorations, should carry over into the new year.
FEATURES
By Dorothy Fleetwood | December 15, 1991
"Christmas at the Hagley" highlights holiday traditions of the 19th century through Jan. 1. The Hagley Museum, which is situated on the site of the original du Pont mills, estate and gardens in Wilmington, invites the public to see the decorated du Pont family home, Eleutherian Mills. Elaborate decorations are featured throughout the 1803 mansion from the apple fan doorway to the sweeping stairway in the hall draped with pine ropes and red ribbons, a Victorian tree in the parlor and harp in the music room covered with greens and strung with red berries.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2011
R. George Hopkins, a retired Anne Arundel County funeral director who filled his lawn each year at Christmas with handmade decorations he created and his basement with admirers of his model railroad empire, died Dec. 6 of cancer at Baltimore Washington Medical Center. The Crownsville resident was 61. The son of an Aberdeen Proving Ground firefighter and a homemaker, Ray George Hopkins, who was known as George Hopkins, was born in Elkton and raised in Betterton. After graduating from Chestertown High School in 1970, he enrolled at McAllister Institute of Mortuary Science in New York City, from which he graduated in 1971.
NEWS
By Tiffany Arnold, The Herald-Mail of Hagerstown | December 5, 2010
Anyone who has ever wondered what kind of people leave their Christmas lights up all year, meet the Morgans, the kind of neighbors you'll either love or hate. About seven years ago, Mary and Richard Morgan decided they weren't going to take down their Christmas lights. Ever. Traditionalists — those appalled at the thought of putting up Christmas lights any sooner than Thanksgiving and leaving them up beyond New Year's — would probably consider what the Morgans have done as something akin to sacrilege.
NEWS
December 18, 1992
Christmas decorations stolen in Creek ViewSomeone is stealing outdoor Christmas decorations from homes in the Creek View neighborhood in Riviera Beach, county police said yesterday.Police said a woman who lives in the 8500 block of Summit Road reported this week that someone stole a four-foot high plastic Santa Claus ornament from her front yard Tuesday night.When they investigated, police said, witnesses told them several youths in the neighborhood had been bragging about stealing Christmas decorations.
NEWS
By Photos by Elizabeth Malby : Sun photographer | November 29, 2006
Although Thanksgiving is barely in the past, the historic Howard County town of Ellicott City is awash in Christmas decorations. The warmish weather of the past few days has provided an opportunity for people to leisurely walk around and view the decorations to best advantage while also doing some gift shopping.
FEATURES
By Catherine Mallette, The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2012
Clean out your basement then shop for cool stuff and save lives in the process. The Humane Society of Harford County hosts a two-day yard sale, Aug. 31 and Sept. 1 benefiting the adorable animals in its shelter, including Louis the rabbit (she's a girl) and Queenie a sweet 2-year-old kitty.   There are many ways to get involved. Here, the most obvious: 1. You can make donations for the sale. Bring your household items, pet supplies, holiday decor, games, books and what-have-you to the shelter.  (No clothing, TVs or computers)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2011
R. George Hopkins, a retired Anne Arundel County funeral director who filled his lawn each year at Christmas with handmade decorations he created and his basement with admirers of his model railroad empire, died Dec. 6 of cancer at Baltimore Washington Medical Center. The Crownsville resident was 61. The son of an Aberdeen Proving Ground firefighter and a homemaker, Ray George Hopkins, who was known as George Hopkins, was born in Elkton and raised in Betterton. After graduating from Chestertown High School in 1970, he enrolled at McAllister Institute of Mortuary Science in New York City, from which he graduated in 1971.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | November 24, 2011
Doug Matthews was ahead of everybody else in the take-back-Thanksgiving movement. The New Jersey husband and father of three was angry last year about Christmas creep. And when the dedicated foodie posted his thoughts on a recipe website, he found himself with a lot of company. "I didn't expect the response," said Matthews by phone from his home in Mendham. "I was surprised, but a lot of people out there were thinking what I was — that you don't start Christmas in the middle of Thanksgiving.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2011
Clifton A. Milway, a retired career utility company lineman who was known for his flavorful slow-cooked pit beef, died June 21 of complications from a broken hip at Upper Chesapeake Medical Center in Bel Air. The Bel Air resident was 90. The son of farmers, Mr. Milway was born and raised in Fork, where he graduated from public schools. He served in the Army during World War II. Mr. Milway went to work as a lineman in 1946 for Baltimore Gas & Electric Co., from which he retired in 1986.
NEWS
Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2010
Joseph Vogel of Parkville had never seen this angel before, nor the blow-up Santa, the reindeer, the baby Jesus. But when he woke up Thursday morning and looked out front of his two-story house, there they were, along with a string of snowflakes, lights, a wreath and Christmas packages. All the Christmas decorations were stolen from elsewhere, and placed on his lawn in the 2400 block of Autumn View Way with great care in the dead of night. "Whoever did this went through an elaborate effort to decorate somebody's lawn," said Vogel, who had a furlough day Thursday from his job in procurement at the University of Maryland, College Park.
NEWS
By Tiffany Arnold, The Herald-Mail of Hagerstown | December 5, 2010
Anyone who has ever wondered what kind of people leave their Christmas lights up all year, meet the Morgans, the kind of neighbors you'll either love or hate. About seven years ago, Mary and Richard Morgan decided they weren't going to take down their Christmas lights. Ever. Traditionalists — those appalled at the thought of putting up Christmas lights any sooner than Thanksgiving and leaving them up beyond New Year's — would probably consider what the Morgans have done as something akin to sacrilege.
NEWS
October 6, 1999
Consignment shop opens at O'Malley Senior CenterA consignment shop has opened at the O'Malley Senior Center, offering handcrafted items such as quilted wall hanging, wooden crafts, flower arrangements, paintings, folk art, pillows, decorative mailboxes and Christmas decorations.The shop will be open weekdays from 8: 30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Information: 410-222-6227 or 301-621-9515.
NEWS
December 14, 2005
The doors and windows of historic Annapolis are decked out for the holidays. Pine wreaths, Christmas decorations, fruit arrangements and colored lights make each entryway unique and inviting. For those who wander along Prince George, King George, Pinkney and Fleet streets, Maryland Avenue and other roads, these doorway decorations help set a festive mood in the state capital.
FEATURES
Susan Reimer | December 2, 2010
I was digging around in all the Christmas stuff the other day and thinking, "Didn't I just do this?" Actually, I did just do this. Time got away from me last year, and I didn't get the Christmas decorations down until around Valentine's Day, and I didn't put them away until about Easter. I don't know. I was busy, I guess. So, technically, I did just do this. For about the 28 t h time. And I found myself sighing with something like boredom. Over the years, I have edited my collection of Christmas stuff so that only the best or most treasured items get a spot in our tiny house.
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