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Christmas Carol

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NEWS
December 25, 2009
Christmas comes but once a year, and the reflections of 2009 have not been pretty for many of us. Like Ebenezer Scrooge, it has been easy to be self-absorbed in our daily survival as our world swirls around us. Like Bob Cratchit, we are equally concerned about keeping our positions as we are about our families' future if those positions are lost. Scrooge's business was lending money to others by taking ownership of their desires, even though many of his clients could not afford Scrooge's financial entanglements, a case not far removed from the folly of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac's spending binge that put us all in debt for decades to come.
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NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2013
In Anne Arundel County, we celebrate Christmas on stages at Maryland Hall or Anne Arundel Community College's Kauffman Theater or St. John's College's Key Auditorium or the Chesapeake Arts Center and at several area churches. Here is a rundown of seasonal fare, which comes with a suggestion to order tickets promptly to avoid disappointment - many will sell out. • On Saturday, Dec. 7, at 8 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 8, at 3 p.m., a 67-year Christmas tradition continues with selections from Handel's "Messiah," sung by the Naval Academy Glee Club joined by Metropolitan Opera soloists and members of the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra, at the Naval Academy Chapel . Tickets range from $20 to $35. For details, call 410-293-8497 or go to tickets.com.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2011
Composer Bob Christianson is nothing if not versatile. He wrote a lot of pulsating music that accompanied episodes about several, um, energetic women in New York on the HBO series "Sex and the City. " He has provided themes for Travel Channel's "Mysteries of the Museum" and "Inside the Grand Canyon," and the Military Channel's "The Day After D-Day," to name a few more. His credits also include themes for sports programs and promos on ABC and ESPN. "Which is funny," Christianson said, "because I am not a sports person.
NEWS
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 23, 2013
The performing arts scene is revved up for another holiday season. In addition to the usual flurry of such perennial favorites as Handel's "Messiah" and Tchaikovsky's "The Nutcracker," this year's lineup gains fresh spice from several new-to-Baltimore productions, including a play about the last Christmas of the Civil War and stage adaptations of popular holiday movies. Here's a look at some of these novel attractions. 'A Civil War Christmas' In 1997, just before the premiere of "How I Learned to Drive," the powerful play about child abuse that would earn her a Pulitzer Prize, Paula Vogel got the inspiration for a very different work.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2011
It's time to kindle our Christmas spirits by catching a performance of Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" — a classic that first appeared in 1843 and is now a perennial theater favorite each holiday season. Pasadena Theatre Company is renewing its own holiday tradition of presenting "A Christmas Carol" for a total of six performances at Chesapeake Arts Center in Brooklyn Park. Set in Victorian London, "A Christmas Carol" tells the story of stingy merchant Scrooge, who chases carolers away in the play's opening scene and in another Christmas Eve scene counts the number of coals his beleaguered clerk, Bob Cratchit, burns to take the bitter chill from his office.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 19, 1996
If the glut of "Christmas Carols" is beginning to seem like a drag, then the Forum Theater has a dickens of a twist for you.Titled "The Farndale Avenue Housing Estate Townswomen's Guild Dramatic Society's Production of A Christmas Carol," this farcical cross-dressing rendition by David McGillivray and Walter Zerlin Jr. made its debut at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in 1987.Admittedly, a drag "Christmas Carol" isn't for everyone. But as directed by Bill Toscano, this amusing show is so congenial, it could be just the thing to ward off last-minute holiday hysteria.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 18, 1997
If you need a break from Christmas shopping -- or worse, if Christmas shopping has led you to forget what the holiday is really about -- there's still time to catch two local shows inspired by Charles Dickens' classic, "A Christmas Carol." But you'll have to hurry. Both the Spotlighters' musical, "Scrooge," and Fell's Point Corner Theatre's original play, "Whatever Happened to Jacob Marley?" close this weekend.The Leslie Bricusse musical, "Scrooge," has become a tradition at the Spotlighters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 29, 2001
It's that Christmas Carol time of year again, and Pumpkin Theatre is putting its own spin on the Dickens classic with a musical version adapted by producer-director Todd Pearthree and local playwright David Brown. The most lavish production in Pumpkin's 34-year history, A Christmas Carol opens Saturday, under Pearthree's direction. Robert Riggs stars as stingy Ebenezer Scrooge. Tom Burns is his overworked clerk, Bob Cratchit; Joey Hellman, Liz Boyer Hunnicutt and Dennis Wood play the three ghosts.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | December 3, 1994
Baltimore theatergoers who bought tickets to special performances of "A Christmas Carol" are crying humbug -- because the show is as invisible as the ghost of Christmas past.An all-star cast was to have performed the Christmas classic this month at the Homewood campus of the Johns Hopkins University, but the producer never paid for the auditorium -- prompting the university to cancel the show and leaving ticket buyers struggling to get their money back.Authorities say that it's not the first time that the California-based producer, Kevin Von Feldt, has advertised an elaborate production of "A Christmas Carol" only to back out because of financial difficulties.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Contributing Writer | December 11, 1992
After a hiatus in which the show moved to the now defunc Annapolis Dinner Theater, "A Christmas Carol," a seasonal smash in Maryland's capital, has returned to its original home at the Colonial Players of Annapolis' theater on East Street.On the whole, audiences ought to come away well pleased by the return of the Dick Gessner, Rick Wade adaptation of Charles Dickens' immortal story.After all, who can resist the glitter of a familiar old ornament that hangs in the same place of honor on the tree each year?
NEWS
December 19, 2012
Paging Mr. Fezziwig. One might get the notion that Charles Dickens' good-hearted fictional employer was back in business after the announcement this week by a private equity firm, Cerberus Capital Management, that it intends to sell Freedom Group Inc., the company that manufactured the Bushmaster rifle used in the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre. Was this a sudden case of moral conviction? Meanwhile, Dick's Sporting Goods has suspended sales of semiautomatic rifles at its stores.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, For The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2012
A favorite holiday tradition has come to Toby's Dinner Theater of Columbia for the first time in a musical production of Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol. " Toby's has chosen the version by Oscar-winning composer Alan Menken, known for his work in Disney films, with lyrics by Lynn Ahrens of "Ragtime" fame. The show ran for a decade of holiday seasons at New York's Madison Square Garden, where it consistently played to capacity audiences. Menken's music brings an upbeat quality to Dickens' familiar tale of stingy, nasty Ebenezer Scrooge, who is visited by several ghosts on Christmas Eve to bring about his transformation by Christmas Day. More relevant to contemporary tastes, this fast-paced version is suitable for all, from grandparents to children.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | November 29, 2012
One thing that Ebenezer Scrooge does not get is a good night's sleep. That's because pesky ghosts keep appearing with reminders that he needs to reconsider his grumpy life. Ever since Charles Dickens wrote "A Christmas Carol" in 1843, audiences have enjoyed accompanying Scrooge on his overnight ethical transformation. You have yet another opportunity to ride along in the musical theater version of "A Christmas Carol" that's being festively staged at Toby's Dinner Theatre of Columbia.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2011
Composer Bob Christianson is nothing if not versatile. He wrote a lot of pulsating music that accompanied episodes about several, um, energetic women in New York on the HBO series "Sex and the City. " He has provided themes for Travel Channel's "Mysteries of the Museum" and "Inside the Grand Canyon," and the Military Channel's "The Day After D-Day," to name a few more. His credits also include themes for sports programs and promos on ABC and ESPN. "Which is funny," Christianson said, "because I am not a sports person.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 24, 2011
It's time to kindle our Christmas spirits by catching a performance of Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol" — a classic that first appeared in 1843 and is now a perennial theater favorite each holiday season. Pasadena Theatre Company is renewing its own holiday tradition of presenting "A Christmas Carol" for a total of six performances at Chesapeake Arts Center in Brooklyn Park. Set in Victorian London, "A Christmas Carol" tells the story of stingy merchant Scrooge, who chases carolers away in the play's opening scene and in another Christmas Eve scene counts the number of coals his beleaguered clerk, Bob Cratchit, burns to take the bitter chill from his office.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2011
Colonial Players' production of "Little Women, The Musical" rises above much of the show's material, making it a worthy holiday offering to alternate with the Players' traditional "Christmas Carol," a favorite that will not be presented this year. An inspired choice of family entertainment, CP's production of the musical version of Louisa May Alcott's 19th-century novel brings to life the Civil War-era experiences of sisters Jo, Meg, Beth, Amy and their mother, Marmee. Interspersed at scene changes and enhancing the holiday mood are traditional carols sung by nine singers in solo and chorus.
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