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Christmas Bird Count

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NEWS
By WILLIAM AMELIA | December 24, 1992
Nearly 100 years ago, an editorial in a minor Audubon Societ journal called for people to count birds, not shoot them. The editorial's plea was made as a protest to the ''side hunt,'' a thoughtless competition for hunters to see who could kill the most birds and mammals in an afternoon.Twenty-five people responded and tabulated 5,000 birds in 27 counts. Frank Chapman, who wrote the editorial, was among the original group, as was Wilmer Stone, the eminent ornithologist who would later write the classic, ''Bird Studies at Old Cape May.''Every year since then, people -- like birds -- have been banding together in groups across the nation to count our birds.
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NEWS
January 4, 2006
The Anne Arundel Bird Club sponsored its annual Annapolis/Gibson Island Christmas Bird Count on New Year's Day. According to the Audubon Society's Web site, the event began on Christmas in 1900 with 27 birdwatchers in 25 locations across Canada and the United States. This year, the event attracted more than 55,000 volunteers in 2,000 locations. The Anne Arundel Bird Club tally was held at Arlington Echo Outdoor Education Center in Millersville. The results from all the counts will be presented in the Audubon Society's State of the Birds reports, which will be used to prioritize conservation activities.
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NEWS
January 4, 2006
The Anne Arundel Bird Club sponsored its annual Annapolis/Gibson Island Christmas Bird Count on New Year's Day. According to the Audubon Society's Web site, the event began on Christmas in 1900 with 27 birdwatchers in 25 locations across Canada and the United States. This year, the event attracted more than 55,000 volunteers in 2,000 locations. The Anne Arundel Bird Club tally was held at Arlington Echo Outdoor Education Center in Millersville. The results from all the counts will be presented in the Audubon Society's State of the Birds reports, which will be used to prioritize conservation activities.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 12, 2004
Critter counts. We've been doing them since Howdy Doody was a 2-by-4, from swans a-swimming and geese a-laying to Dr. Seuss' red fish and blue fish. This year is no different. Hearty bands of volunteers will be tromping around this season, sizing up the populations of bird species and taking stock of the traditional spawning grounds of yellow perch. Both groups could use a couple more boots (and waders) on the ground. Tuesday starts the 105th annual "Christmas Bird Count" sponsored by the National Audubon Society and billed as the nation's oldest and largest citizen-run science project.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1996
CHESTERTOWN -- David Holmes can find a bird anywhere, even in midsentence."This is the West Fork of Langford Creek and -- ooh, there's an eagle," he said yesterday at the annual Christmas Bird Count in Kent County, as he looked across a glittering creek edged with snow and filled with geese.So it went for much of the day, as he counted ducks, geese, vultures, swamp sparrows, bluebirds, herons, pigeons and hundreds more.Holmes, a music teacher and part-time ornithologist who drove to Kent County from his home in Columbia, was one of 22 bird-watchers taking part in the annual survey.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 14, 2003
In this season of geese a-laying and swans a-swimming and turtle doves doing whatever they do, it feels right that folks would take to the field to count our feathered friends. The National Audubon Society's Christmas Bird Count will be conducted at 24 locations around Maryland between today and Jan. 4. The event, in its 104th year, is the largest science project in this country run by just-plain folks. At the turn of the 20th century, bird surveys were conducted on post-hunting carcasses (that would be a cartridge in a pear tree)
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | January 4, 1993
Armed with binoculars and a small telescope, Hal Wierenga trudged through a muddy field near the Bay Bridge searching for the prize of the day -- a single yellow warbler spotted earlier by a colleague."
NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | January 9, 2000
WE had about 100 visitors drop by the house on New Year's Day, maybe more. Many of them came back for second helpings and thirds. We managed quite well and kept the groaning board amply supplied, however, because our guests' appetites were mostly peckish and they ate like birds. Actually, they were birds. The clear, sunny winter weather was a welcome relief to our avian neighbors, and to us. It was a grand time for enjoying the moment before the penetrating gray, frozen blanket of winter falls for the duration.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 12, 2004
Critter counts. We've been doing them since Howdy Doody was a 2-by-4, from swans a-swimming and geese a-laying to Dr. Seuss' red fish and blue fish. This year is no different. Hearty bands of volunteers will be tromping around this season, sizing up the populations of bird species and taking stock of the traditional spawning grounds of yellow perch. Both groups could use a couple more boots (and waders) on the ground. Tuesday starts the 105th annual "Christmas Bird Count" sponsored by the National Audubon Society and billed as the nation's oldest and largest citizen-run science project.
NEWS
January 4, 1992
At the turn of the century, Christmas Day activities often included a hunt where teams competed to see how many birds and beasts they could kill. In 1900, the Audubon Society began a peaceful -- and useful -- counter-tradition, one that has endured much longer than the "side hunt." The Christmas Bird Count now extends throughout the holiday season. In Maryland alone, there are 22 separate day-long counts, the last of which took place in Annapolis on New Year's Day.For hundreds of Marylanders, holiday bird counts are a staple of the season, a way of savoring winter landscapes and bumping binoculars with fellow birders as parties of participants follow pre-set routes, keeping a tally of species they spot and the numbers of individual birds.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 14, 2003
In this season of geese a-laying and swans a-swimming and turtle doves doing whatever they do, it feels right that folks would take to the field to count our feathered friends. The National Audubon Society's Christmas Bird Count will be conducted at 24 locations around Maryland between today and Jan. 4. The event, in its 104th year, is the largest science project in this country run by just-plain folks. At the turn of the 20th century, bird surveys were conducted on post-hunting carcasses (that would be a cartridge in a pear tree)
NEWS
By MIKE BURNS | January 9, 2000
WE had about 100 visitors drop by the house on New Year's Day, maybe more. Many of them came back for second helpings and thirds. We managed quite well and kept the groaning board amply supplied, however, because our guests' appetites were mostly peckish and they ate like birds. Actually, they were birds. The clear, sunny winter weather was a welcome relief to our avian neighbors, and to us. It was a grand time for enjoying the moment before the penetrating gray, frozen blanket of winter falls for the duration.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1996
CHESTERTOWN -- David Holmes can find a bird anywhere, even in midsentence."This is the West Fork of Langford Creek and -- ooh, there's an eagle," he said yesterday at the annual Christmas Bird Count in Kent County, as he looked across a glittering creek edged with snow and filled with geese.So it went for much of the day, as he counted ducks, geese, vultures, swamp sparrows, bluebirds, herons, pigeons and hundreds more.Holmes, a music teacher and part-time ornithologist who drove to Kent County from his home in Columbia, was one of 22 bird-watchers taking part in the annual survey.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff Writer | January 4, 1993
Armed with binoculars and a small telescope, Hal Wierenga trudged through a muddy field near the Bay Bridge searching for the prize of the day -- a single yellow warbler spotted earlier by a colleague."
NEWS
By WILLIAM AMELIA | December 24, 1992
Nearly 100 years ago, an editorial in a minor Audubon Societ journal called for people to count birds, not shoot them. The editorial's plea was made as a protest to the ''side hunt,'' a thoughtless competition for hunters to see who could kill the most birds and mammals in an afternoon.Twenty-five people responded and tabulated 5,000 birds in 27 counts. Frank Chapman, who wrote the editorial, was among the original group, as was Wilmer Stone, the eminent ornithologist who would later write the classic, ''Bird Studies at Old Cape May.''Every year since then, people -- like birds -- have been banding together in groups across the nation to count our birds.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | December 15, 2005
If 105 years of tradition are any indication of its popularity, tens of thousands of birding enthusiasts will take part in this edition of the annual Christmas Bird Count sponsored by the National Audubon Society that started yesterday and will end Jan. 5. The bird census is a chance for experts and amateurs alike to help the world's premier bird conservation group track the rise and decline of feathered species and their habitats. Last year, 23 groups across Maryland conducted counts, including one at the Inner Harbor (you can read the report at audubon.
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