Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChristine Todd Whitman
IN THE NEWS

Christine Todd Whitman

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 27, 1993
NEWARK, N.J. -- Frequently testy, at other times agitated, Webster B. Todd Jr., the brother of Gov.-elect Christine Todd Whitman, completed his sworn testimony before lawyers for the Democratic Party yesterday, offering nothing to advance their investigation into allegations that Republicans paid to suppress the urban black vote in the election for governor.In testimony sprinkled with the response "I don't know," Mr. Todd acknowledged that his sister's campaign strategy included keeping the Democratic vote light, but he steadfastly denied allegations of paid voter suppression.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 13, 2002
WASHINGTON - Although her office strongly denies it, agency insiders, Capitol Hill staff and environmental groups expect Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Christine Todd Whitman to leave her job soon. Whitman, a former New Jersey governor and a high-profile Republican moderate, has been a green-friendly face on President Bush's environmental team, but she reportedly has chafed at the administration's pro-development policies. Among the signs of her imminent departure, EPA watchers say, are: She isn't setting any appointments for meetings after Jan. 1, according to people in the EPA, on Capitol Hill and in environmental organizations.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1998
New Jersey Gov. Christine Todd Whitman, a hero to Ellen R. Sauerbrey in 1994 and now perhaps a cautionary tale as well, helped her raise $25,000 last night at a fund-raiser in Rockville.Although the two women disagree on abortion -- Whitman favors abortion rights, Sauerbrey does not -- they stressed their ideological similarities on such issues as tax cuts, fighting crime and requiring more accountability from public schools."Some of these social issues, while we can have deep personal feelings, are not what drives the office of governor," said Whitman, part of a parade of nationally prominent Republicans who have visited Maryland to support Sauerbrey.
NEWS
By David A. Love | December 11, 2000
THE NEWS ABOUT racial profiling in New Jersey came as no surprise to me. One day several years ago, I was driving my brother to college and was traveling on the New Jersey Turnpike. A young, white state trooper followed us for more than a mile and then pulled us over to the side of the road. We were driving the speed limit. My brother asked the officer why he had stopped us. "You were changing lanes too fast," he replied, and gave us a speeding ticket. I was angry, but under no illusion that my Harvard alumni bumper sticker would immunize my brother and me from racial profiling.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 7, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In what he described as an effort to promote civility, Sen. Bob Dole yesterday called for a "declaration of tolerance" in the Republican Party platform on abortion and other issues that threaten to split the GOP at its August convention and in the fall campaign.Dole, who has consistently voted against abortion in his more than three decades in Congress, said he would keep the anti-abortion language that appeared in the party's 1992 platform.But he said he would add a clause like that espoused by Ronald Reagan in 1980, acknowledging that Republicans "recognize different views" on abortion "among Americans in general -- and in our own party."
NEWS
December 15, 1995
IF THE REPUBLICAN PARTY is to do what it has never done before, its candidate for vice president in 1996 will be a woman, Gov. Christine Todd Whitman of New Jersey. And if any presidential nominee is to make such a bold move, that nominee will be Sen. Bob Dole.In getting his eighteenth gubernatorial endorsement this week, the Senate majority leader (and current front runner) may well have begun the process of moving back toward the political center where he used to be and where the votes are. Christie Whitman is as conservative as they get on such economic issues as cutting taxes, reducing federal regulation and privatizing government operations when the opportunity arises.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 13, 2002
WASHINGTON - Although her office strongly denies it, agency insiders, Capitol Hill staff and environmental groups expect Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Christine Todd Whitman to leave her job soon. Whitman, a former New Jersey governor and a high-profile Republican moderate, has been a green-friendly face on President Bush's environmental team, but she reportedly has chafed at the administration's pro-development policies. Among the signs of her imminent departure, EPA watchers say, are: She isn't setting any appointments for meetings after Jan. 1, according to people in the EPA, on Capitol Hill and in environmental organizations.
NEWS
April 29, 1995
In London the other day, New Jersey Gov. Christine Todd Whitman was trying to explain why you can't legislate morality. As an example of immoral behavior she described a "jewels in the crown" game in which she said young black males attempt to outdo each other fathering illegitimate children.The remark would be enough to get almost any white politician in trouble back home in the states. That was especially so with Mrs. Whitman, who already carried considerable baggage in regard to the African-American community.
NEWS
By Bruce S. Rosen | October 19, 1994
Roseland, N.J. -- ONE OF CHRISTINE Todd Whitman's first acts as governor of New Jersey nine months ago was to commute the death sentence of Taro, the Akita convicted of biting a 10-year-old girl, on the condition that the dog leave the state forever.The solution pleased outraged dog lovers, while the governor's aides rejoiced that publicity over the pending execution had been defused.But though "out of sight, out of mind" is surely expedient, what does it say to the next 10-year-old unlucky enough to cross the dog's path?
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | November 7, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Three weeks before election day Christine Wells, a radio advertising saleswoman who lives near Parsippany, N.J., explained why she was deserting Gov. Christine Todd Whitman this year.''I'm a Republican and all,'' she said, ''but I'm pro-life and she's just not reliable. That's what I hear from my friends at church, that she can't be trusted. I don't want to see her in the White House.''A minorityVoters for whom the abortion rights issue is dominant apparently make up a small minority in New Jersey, as they do elsewhere.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1998
New Jersey Gov. Christine Todd Whitman, a hero to Ellen R. Sauerbrey in 1994 and now perhaps a cautionary tale as well, helped her raise $25,000 last night at a fund-raiser in Rockville.Although the two women disagree on abortion -- Whitman favors abortion rights, Sauerbrey does not -- they stressed their ideological similarities on such issues as tax cuts, fighting crime and requiring more accountability from public schools."Some of these social issues, while we can have deep personal feelings, are not what drives the office of governor," said Whitman, part of a parade of nationally prominent Republicans who have visited Maryland to support Sauerbrey.
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | November 7, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Three weeks before election day Christine Wells, a radio advertising saleswoman who lives near Parsippany, N.J., explained why she was deserting Gov. Christine Todd Whitman this year.''I'm a Republican and all,'' she said, ''but I'm pro-life and she's just not reliable. That's what I hear from my friends at church, that she can't be trusted. I don't want to see her in the White House.''A minorityVoters for whom the abortion rights issue is dominant apparently make up a small minority in New Jersey, as they do elsewhere.
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | October 17, 1997
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. -- Four years ago Christine Todd Whitman made a grand entrance onto the national political scene by upsetting Democratic Gov. Jim Florio, who had made the politically terminal mistake of raising state taxes after promising not to do so.Republican Whitman won by making her own promise that she would cut state income taxes 30 percent. And once in office, she delivered on that promise, albeit with a little creative fiscal maneuvering.She became an instant political celebrity, the subject of speculation about whether she might end up on a Republican national ticket.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 7, 1996
WASHINGTON -- In what he described as an effort to promote civility, Sen. Bob Dole yesterday called for a "declaration of tolerance" in the Republican Party platform on abortion and other issues that threaten to split the GOP at its August convention and in the fall campaign.Dole, who has consistently voted against abortion in his more than three decades in Congress, said he would keep the anti-abortion language that appeared in the party's 1992 platform.But he said he would add a clause like that espoused by Ronald Reagan in 1980, acknowledging that Republicans "recognize different views" on abortion "among Americans in general -- and in our own party."
NEWS
December 15, 1995
IF THE REPUBLICAN PARTY is to do what it has never done before, its candidate for vice president in 1996 will be a woman, Gov. Christine Todd Whitman of New Jersey. And if any presidential nominee is to make such a bold move, that nominee will be Sen. Bob Dole.In getting his eighteenth gubernatorial endorsement this week, the Senate majority leader (and current front runner) may well have begun the process of moving back toward the political center where he used to be and where the votes are. Christie Whitman is as conservative as they get on such economic issues as cutting taxes, reducing federal regulation and privatizing government operations when the opportunity arises.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | August 17, 1995
TRENTON, N.J. -- These are heady days for New Jersey's freshman Republican Gov. Christine Todd Whitman. One year early, her state legislature has just enacted a third income-tax cut, completing her 1993 campaign pledge for a full 30 percent reduction in her first term.The achievement intensifies talk that she would be the ideal vice-presidential candidate on the GOP national ticket next year: a two-fer -- a woman with a record as a proven fiscal conservative. But the threat of the Conservative Coalition and other strongly anti-abortion groups to reject any ticket with an abortion rights advocate such as Whitman casts a shadow over the possibility.
NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | August 17, 1995
TRENTON, N.J. -- These are heady days for New Jersey's freshman Republican Gov. Christine Todd Whitman. One year early, her state legislature has just enacted a third income-tax cut, completing her 1993 campaign pledge for a full 30 percent reduction in her first term.The achievement intensifies talk that she would be the ideal vice-presidential candidate on the GOP national ticket next year: a two-fer -- a woman with a record as a proven fiscal conservative. But the threat of the Conservative Coalition and other strongly anti-abortion groups to reject any ticket with an abortion rights advocate such as Whitman casts a shadow over the possibility.
NEWS
By JACK W. GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | October 17, 1997
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. -- Four years ago Christine Todd Whitman made a grand entrance onto the national political scene by upsetting Democratic Gov. Jim Florio, who had made the politically terminal mistake of raising state taxes after promising not to do so.Republican Whitman won by making her own promise that she would cut state income taxes 30 percent. And once in office, she delivered on that promise, albeit with a little creative fiscal maneuvering.She became an instant political celebrity, the subject of speculation about whether she might end up on a Republican national ticket.
NEWS
April 29, 1995
In London the other day, New Jersey Gov. Christine Todd Whitman was trying to explain why you can't legislate morality. As an example of immoral behavior she described a "jewels in the crown" game in which she said young black males attempt to outdo each other fathering illegitimate children.The remark would be enough to get almost any white politician in trouble back home in the states. That was especially so with Mrs. Whitman, who already carried considerable baggage in regard to the African-American community.
NEWS
March 7, 1995
IN 1984, WALTER Mondale made a spectacle of himself interviewing a procession of politically correct candidates for vice president. His choice of then-Rep. Geraldine Ferraro proved less than felicitous.One might have thought that after that object lesson, the affirmative action approach to picking vice presidents would be exhausted. But no, the great mentioners are at it again. Recently, Larry King asked three prominent Republicans how they would feel about a "Dole/Whitman" ticket. And Larry King is not alone.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.