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NEWS
February 23, 1991
Dorothy Jordan Simon, a Christian Science healer and former Baltimore County elementary school teacher, died Feb. 14 at Lynn House, a Christian Science care facility in Alexandria, Va., after a short illness. She was 80.Born in Arkansas, Mrs. Simon taught elementary school in St. Louis and in Muncie, Ind., before moving to Glen Arm in 1960. She taught at Loch Raven Elementary School from 1960 to 1967.She left teaching in 1967 to become a Christian Science practitioner. She was a member of the Fourth Church of Christ, Scientist, in Baltimore, where she served as first and second reader, board member, Sunday school teacher and in numerous other capacities.
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NEWS
December 28, 2007
St. Andrews holds weekly soup sale St. Andrew's United Methodist Church, 4 Wallace Manor Road, Edgewater, will hold its weekly soup sale and indoor flea market from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. tomorrow. Soup will be sold by the quart or gallon, and preorders will be accepted. Space at the flea market is available for $15 for a 10-by-10 foot space and tables are $5. Food concessions will be available. Information: 410-269-7671. `Burning bowl' ceremony set Unity by the Bay Church, suite 18 at 836 Ritchie Highway in Severna Park, will hold a "burning bowl" ceremony at 10:30 a.m. Sunday.
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NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1997
In 1908, Christian Science founder Mary Baker Eddy directed her church to start a newspaper, one that would stand in contrast to the yellow journalism of scrappy tabloids. Instead of offering screaming headlines and lurid copy, its uplifting mission would be "to injure no man, but to bless all mankind."Over the course of its nearly 90 years, the Christian Science Monitor has set a high standard in its national and international reporting. But the past decade has been tumultuous for both the Monitor and the church.
NEWS
January 5, 2007
While budgetary measures, including school funding and the grocery-cigarette tax argument, may garner the most headlines during this year's session of the Mississippi Legislature, there are plenty of other issues to offer a diversion from the weightier matters of finance and good government. Among bills that may or may not make it through committee are measures to castrate rapists, ban cosmetic surgery for inmates, expand rest room facilities for women in state-owned buildings and allow judges to pack weapons.
NEWS
By ROBERTO CUNIBERTI | September 20, 1993
Washington -- There is a troubling tendency in news reports and commentaries about the cases involving Christian Scientists to presume that prayer treatment cannot seriously be expected to be effective. But this willingness to discount the significance of spirituality raises a host of questions.If we were to do survey of all who engage in regular religious worship how many instances of physical healing would we find? We see occasional articles in the paper about individuals or families who attribute recovery from life-threatening illness to the power of prayer.
NEWS
By Cynthia Parsons | May 20, 1992
MY CHURCH is in a mess created by a host of interlocking fiscal and theological troubles. Most distressing to the serious student of Christian Science is the theological turmoil we are in over the place of Mary Baker Eddy, the founder of the denomination.The church's century-plus history has been fraught with controversy about Mrs. Eddy. Outside critics have unjustly vilified her; well-meaning insiders have incorrectly deified her.In the past, deifiers have met with solid resistance, first from Mrs. Eddy herself, and later from the church's directors and editors of its religious magazines.
NEWS
December 28, 2007
St. Andrews holds weekly soup sale St. Andrew's United Methodist Church, 4 Wallace Manor Road, Edgewater, will hold its weekly soup sale and indoor flea market from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. tomorrow. Soup will be sold by the quart or gallon, and preorders will be accepted. Space at the flea market is available for $15 for a 10-by-10 foot space and tables are $5. Food concessions will be available. Information: 410-269-7671. `Burning bowl' ceremony set Unity by the Bay Church, suite 18 at 836 Ritchie Highway in Severna Park, will hold a "burning bowl" ceremony at 10:30 a.m. Sunday.
NEWS
March 11, 1993
Jill Gooding, a Christian Scientist from London who is giving a series of lectures in the United States on healing through prayer, will speak in Baltimore Saturday morning.A past president of The Mother Church in Boston and a member of the Christian Science Board of Lectureship, she will discuss her reliance on prayer in the context of modern medical discoveries. She offers examples of spiritual healing and attempt to explain the teachings of Mary Baker Eddy, the founder of Christian Science, as contained in Mrs. Eddy's book, "Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures."
NEWS
By Diane Winston and Diane Winston,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 30, 1990
BOSTON -- In this proper town of tradition, where churche meet the future by clinging to the past, a tiny band of Christian Scientists is pursuing a bold and costly vision. Jettisoning the old ways, church leaders are spending millions to build up a worldwide radio and television venture that will tackle global issues in secular terms.Proponents say they are developing innovative strategies to set the spiritual agenda of the next century. But critics contend that church leaders are selling out the Christian Science birthright -- the disciplined practice of spiritual healing -- for secular success.
NEWS
By Barbara Samson | August 22, 1994
WITH BLEEDING FOOTSTEPS. By Robert David Thomas.Alfred A. Knopf. 363 pages. $27.50.WHEN MARY Baker Eddy died in 1910, the Rochester Times noted that her death marked "the passing of a woman who was probably the most notable of [her generation]." The Chicago Tribune reflected "there passes from this world's activities one of the most remarkable women of her time." Born in 1821, this world-renowned founder of the Christian Science religion rose from being a sickly New Hampshire farm girl to become a "household name across America and famous around the world."
NEWS
April 18, 1998
Study overlooked the effectiveness of religious healingYour article on a study by an advocate group of the effects of prayer on children was misleading because it looked only on negative results of religious healing ("Parents' religions blamed in death of 140 sick children," April 7).The report did show some balance by quoting a Christian Science Church spokesperson, who pointed out the study's lack of reference to positive effects of healing through prayer. No healing system can be fairly evaluated by looking only at its failures.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | August 4, 1997
In 1908, Christian Science founder Mary Baker Eddy directed her church to start a newspaper, one that would stand in contrast to the yellow journalism of scrappy tabloids. Instead of offering screaming headlines and lurid copy, its uplifting mission would be "to injure no man, but to bless all mankind."Over the course of its nearly 90 years, the Christian Science Monitor has set a high standard in its national and international reporting. But the past decade has been tumultuous for both the Monitor and the church.
FEATURES
By Edwin McDowell and Edwin McDowell,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 2, 1996
It used to be that hotel guests could count on finding at least three things in their rooms: a bed, a bathroom and a Gideon Bible. These days the Bibles are even more numerous, but they no longer have the field to themselves.In a growing number of hotels the Bible now keeps company with the Book of Mormon, the Teachings of Buddha and, in rarer cases, with "Science and Health" by Mary Baker Eddy, the founder of Christian Science, or "The Way to Happiness," a publication of the Church of Scientology.
NEWS
By Barbara Samson | August 22, 1994
WITH BLEEDING FOOTSTEPS. By Robert David Thomas.Alfred A. Knopf. 363 pages. $27.50.WHEN MARY Baker Eddy died in 1910, the Rochester Times noted that her death marked "the passing of a woman who was probably the most notable of [her generation]." The Chicago Tribune reflected "there passes from this world's activities one of the most remarkable women of her time." Born in 1821, this world-renowned founder of the Christian Science religion rose from being a sickly New Hampshire farm girl to become a "household name across America and famous around the world."
NEWS
By ROBERTO CUNIBERTI | September 20, 1993
Washington -- There is a troubling tendency in news reports and commentaries about the cases involving Christian Scientists to presume that prayer treatment cannot seriously be expected to be effective. But this willingness to discount the significance of spirituality raises a host of questions.If we were to do survey of all who engage in regular religious worship how many instances of physical healing would we find? We see occasional articles in the paper about individuals or families who attribute recovery from life-threatening illness to the power of prayer.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | July 20, 1993
ST. PAUL, Minn. -- The death four years ago of an 11-year-old boy was recounted in agonizing, hour-by-hour detail for a Hennepin County jury that is deciding a civil lawsuit seeking damages from the Christian Science Church.It is believed to be the first wrongful-death case ever to go to trial anywhere in the country against the 114-year-old Boston-based church, which teaches that illness and injury can be cured through prayer.Ian Lundman died May 9, 1989, of a diabetic coma at the home of his mother and stepfather, Kathleen and William McKown.
NEWS
April 18, 1998
Study overlooked the effectiveness of religious healingYour article on a study by an advocate group of the effects of prayer on children was misleading because it looked only on negative results of religious healing ("Parents' religions blamed in death of 140 sick children," April 7).The report did show some balance by quoting a Christian Science Church spokesperson, who pointed out the study's lack of reference to positive effects of healing through prayer. No healing system can be fairly evaluated by looking only at its failures.
NEWS
January 5, 2007
While budgetary measures, including school funding and the grocery-cigarette tax argument, may garner the most headlines during this year's session of the Mississippi Legislature, there are plenty of other issues to offer a diversion from the weightier matters of finance and good government. Among bills that may or may not make it through committee are measures to castrate rapists, ban cosmetic surgery for inmates, expand rest room facilities for women in state-owned buildings and allow judges to pack weapons.
NEWS
March 11, 1993
Jill Gooding, a Christian Scientist from London who is giving a series of lectures in the United States on healing through prayer, will speak in Baltimore Saturday morning.A past president of The Mother Church in Boston and a member of the Christian Science Board of Lectureship, she will discuss her reliance on prayer in the context of modern medical discoveries. She offers examples of spiritual healing and attempt to explain the teachings of Mary Baker Eddy, the founder of Christian Science, as contained in Mrs. Eddy's book, "Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures."
NEWS
By Cynthia Parsons | May 20, 1992
MY CHURCH is in a mess created by a host of interlocking fiscal and theological troubles. Most distressing to the serious student of Christian Science is the theological turmoil we are in over the place of Mary Baker Eddy, the founder of the denomination.The church's century-plus history has been fraught with controversy about Mrs. Eddy. Outside critics have unjustly vilified her; well-meaning insiders have incorrectly deified her.In the past, deifiers have met with solid resistance, first from Mrs. Eddy herself, and later from the church's directors and editors of its religious magazines.
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