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By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | March 5, 1992
J. Schoeneman Inc., an Owings Mills-based men's clothing maker, has landed an exclusive license to manufacture and distribute Christian Dior suits, sports coats, trousers and rainwear in the United States.James Stankovic, Schoeneman's president, said yesterday that the agreement could bring about $25 million in new sales to the company, which now has annual sales of about $100 million.Schoeneman, a privately held company that has been based in Baltimore for 103 years, has its distribution center in Owings Mills, its manufacturing plant in Chambersburg, Pa., and its cutting operations in Wilmington, Del.The new license could add 250 jobs to the company's work force of 1,600 to 1,700, Mr. Stankovic said.
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By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | December 5, 2007
All I can say about this movie is, pay attention! All will be revealed." Those were Guy Ritchie's opening remarks before the screening of his long-languishing twisty noir thriller, Revolver, at the Tribeca Grand Screening Room on Sunday. When the lights came up, Guy stood again and said, "Thank you all for your support and applause. And you know what - this is the first time I've understood the movie!" Guy Ritchie is a fascinating man, part "larky" bloke out for a good time at the pub with his pals, part (the bigger part)
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By Bernadine Morris and Bernadine Morris,New York Times | February 5, 1992
PARIS -- Caught between the glories of its past and the uncertainties of its future, the haute couture industry has been presenting a fragmented image in the showings of its spring and summer collections this week.Forgetting that fashion is based on change, some couturiers are reliving their past successes and others are marching in place, while a few are showing eccentric clothes.Discussions are going on at every level as to whether the rules for acceptance to the Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne should be changed, as if that will solve everything.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS SERVICE | April 14, 1996
NEW YORK -- Harbor International Growth Fund has made a killing for its investors by not shying away from big bets.The $275 million fund invests in no more than 30 companies around the world, meaning each stake makes up 3 percent to 5 percent of assets. This strategy has helped drive the fund up 48 percent since its inception in November 1993, according to Lipper Analytical Services Inc., making it the best-performing international fund in that period.That return is more than three times that of the Morgan Stanley EAFE/Emerging Markets Index, the benchmark for international money managers.
FEATURES
By Kathleen Parker and Kathleen Parker,Orlando Sentinel | September 19, 1990
It is difficult to recall exactly what one wanted as a four-year-old.More than likely, I wanted whatever my 7-year-old brother had. That might have included a bow and arrow, a football, but most likely one of those Indian heads made out of a coconut.If I'd had a big sister instead, I assume I'd have wanted whatever she had. The very things I later acquired a Barbie doll, a Bride Doll, a Palomino you know, one of those plastic horse models that lined the shelves of girls who never got a real pony.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | August 23, 1994
J. Schoeneman Inc., a 105-year-old manufacturer of menswear, will close its Owings Mills distribution center and move that work to its main factory in Chambersburg, Pa.The decision will move 55 jobs out of state. But Schoeneman said its headquarters, which employs 145 people, will stay in Baltimore County at a yet undetermined site.The action comes shortly after the state has suffered two other economic setbacks -- the announcement by London Fog Corp. that it will close three Maryland plants and lay off 700 workers by the end of October, and the decision by Starbucks Corp.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS SERVICE | April 14, 1996
NEW YORK -- Harbor International Growth Fund has made a killing for its investors by not shying away from big bets.The $275 million fund invests in no more than 30 companies around the world, meaning each stake makes up 3 percent to 5 percent of assets. This strategy has helped drive the fund up 48 percent since its inception in November 1993, according to Lipper Analytical Services Inc., making it the best-performing international fund in that period.That return is more than three times that of the Morgan Stanley EAFE/Emerging Markets Index, the benchmark for international money managers.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer ZTC | January 20, 1992
Moscow ---AT A CORNER of the big, dull GUM department store on Red Square, the scene seemed at first to be just another money-raising charity scheme.The boy standing there all bundled up against the 15-below-zero cold had a round face. He seemed to be singing something -- some chant from the newly freed Orthodox Church, I immediately thought.Then, as I came nearer, the otherworld liness of this strange little drama assailed my senses. The boy was demented. ("Crazy, crazy," Russians standing there kept saying to me, pointing to their heads.
FEATURES
By LIZ SMITH and LIZ SMITH,Tribune Media Services | December 5, 2007
All I can say about this movie is, pay attention! All will be revealed." Those were Guy Ritchie's opening remarks before the screening of his long-languishing twisty noir thriller, Revolver, at the Tribeca Grand Screening Room on Sunday. When the lights came up, Guy stood again and said, "Thank you all for your support and applause. And you know what - this is the first time I've understood the movie!" Guy Ritchie is a fascinating man, part "larky" bloke out for a good time at the pub with his pals, part (the bigger part)
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | April 11, 1993
When it comes to fine men's clothing, certain names come to mind: Burberry, Christian Dior, Halston and J. Schoeneman Inc.Schoeneman?Despite near-anonymity among consumers, the Owings Mills-based company is a major manufacturer of men's suits, jackets and slacks. Its products bear the labels of prominent designers and those of chic retailers such as Saks Fifth Avenue and Neiman-Marcus.Schoeneman, founded in 1889, has outlasted apparel makers such as Lebow Bros., L. Greif and Raleigh Clothes, which have closed their Maryland operations.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | August 23, 1994
J. Schoeneman Inc., a 105-year-old manufacturer of menswear, will close its Owings Mills distribution center and move that work to its main factory in Chambersburg, Pa.The decision will move 55 jobs out of state. But Schoeneman said its headquarters, which employs 145 people, will stay in Baltimore County at a yet undetermined site.The action comes shortly after the state has suffered two other economic setbacks -- the announcement by London Fog Corp. that it will close three Maryland plants and lay off 700 workers by the end of October, and the decision by Starbucks Corp.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Staff Writer | April 11, 1993
When it comes to fine men's clothing, certain names come to mind: Burberry, Christian Dior, Halston and J. Schoeneman Inc.Schoeneman?Despite near-anonymity among consumers, the Owings Mills-based company is a major manufacturer of men's suits, jackets and slacks. Its products bear the labels of prominent designers and those of chic retailers such as Saks Fifth Avenue and Neiman-Marcus.Schoeneman, founded in 1889, has outlasted apparel makers such as Lebow Bros., L. Greif and Raleigh Clothes, which have closed their Maryland operations.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | March 5, 1992
J. Schoeneman Inc., an Owings Mills-based men's clothing maker, has landed an exclusive license to manufacture and distribute Christian Dior suits, sports coats, trousers and rainwear in the United States.James Stankovic, Schoeneman's president, said yesterday that the agreement could bring about $25 million in new sales to the company, which now has annual sales of about $100 million.Schoeneman, a privately held company that has been based in Baltimore for 103 years, has its distribution center in Owings Mills, its manufacturing plant in Chambersburg, Pa., and its cutting operations in Wilmington, Del.The new license could add 250 jobs to the company's work force of 1,600 to 1,700, Mr. Stankovic said.
FEATURES
By Bernadine Morris and Bernadine Morris,New York Times | February 5, 1992
PARIS -- Caught between the glories of its past and the uncertainties of its future, the haute couture industry has been presenting a fragmented image in the showings of its spring and summer collections this week.Forgetting that fashion is based on change, some couturiers are reliving their past successes and others are marching in place, while a few are showing eccentric clothes.Discussions are going on at every level as to whether the rules for acceptance to the Chambre Syndicale de la Couture Parisienne should be changed, as if that will solve everything.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer ZTC | January 20, 1992
Moscow ---AT A CORNER of the big, dull GUM department store on Red Square, the scene seemed at first to be just another money-raising charity scheme.The boy standing there all bundled up against the 15-below-zero cold had a round face. He seemed to be singing something -- some chant from the newly freed Orthodox Church, I immediately thought.Then, as I came nearer, the otherworld liness of this strange little drama assailed my senses. The boy was demented. ("Crazy, crazy," Russians standing there kept saying to me, pointing to their heads.
FEATURES
By Kathleen Parker and Kathleen Parker,Orlando Sentinel | September 19, 1990
It is difficult to recall exactly what one wanted as a four-year-old.More than likely, I wanted whatever my 7-year-old brother had. That might have included a bow and arrow, a football, but most likely one of those Indian heads made out of a coconut.If I'd had a big sister instead, I assume I'd have wanted whatever she had. The very things I later acquired a Barbie doll, a Bride Doll, a Palomino you know, one of those plastic horse models that lined the shelves of girls who never got a real pony.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Staff Writer | March 5, 1992
J. Schoeneman Inc., an Owings Mills-based men's clothing maker, has landed an exclusive license to manufacture and distribute Christian Dior suits, sports coats, trousers and rainwear in the United States.James Stankovic, Schoeneman's president, said yesterday that the agreement could bring about $25 million in new sales to the company, which now has annual sales of about $100 million.Schoeneman, a privately held company that has been based in Baltimore for 103 years, has its distribution center in Owings Mills, its manufacturing plant in Chambersburg, Pa., and its cutting operations in Wilmington, Del.The new license could add 250 jobs to the company's work force of 1,600 to 1,700, Mr. Stankovic said.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff | January 13, 2002
When a working woman yanks a pantsuit off the rack at Marshalls or TJ Maxx, she can -- if she thinks about it -- thank Yves Saint Laurent for the privilege. We, on the trickle-down side of Saint Laurent's haute couture, take his closet practicality for granted. But someone had to think of it and stitch it into suitable reality. The revered French designer, who announced his retirement on Monday, became a fashion star when he took over the House of Christian Dior at age 21. He went on to bring us the see-through blouse, the black leather jacket and safari chic, liberation on all fronts.
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