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NEWS
May 23, 1995
In contrast to the take-no-prisoners rhetoric that often characterized their past political forays, the Christian Coalition's Contract with the American Family suggests this 1.5 million member group recognizes the need for compromise on some issues.A notable instance: Rather than seeking an absolute ban on abortions, it calls only for laws restricting abortions in the last stages of pregnancy -- a move even many abortion-rights supporters may be willing to consider. As coalition chairman Ralph Reed noted before the contract was unveiled with fitting humility: "These are the Ten Suggestions.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 1, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Alarmed at the possibility that the Republican Party might pick Rudolph W. Giuliani as its presidential nominee despite his support for abortion rights, a coalition of influential Christian conservatives is threatening to back a third-party candidate. The threat emerged from a group that broke away for separate discussions at a meeting Saturday in Salt Lake City of the Council for National Policy, a secretive conservative networking group. Participants said the smaller group included James C. Dobson of Focus on the Family, who is perhaps its most influential member; Tony Perkins of the Family Research Council; Richard A. Viguerie, the direct-mail pioneer; and dozens of other politically oriented conservative Christians.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | September 19, 1997
THE CHRISTIAN Coalition held a convention last weekend in Atlanta during which it honored its retiring executive director, Ralph Reed.Mr. Reed did an excellent job articulating moral and ethical issues most politicians are embarrassed to talk about, except in generalities.His retirement provides an opportunity to consider whether two decades of political activity by evangelical Christians has been worth it.When contemporary Christian political activism caught fire in the late 1970s, some said that a sleeping giant was stirring and that it was a majority.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | December 25, 2006
ATLANTA -- For a few decades now, a narrow view of Christianity has dominated the public square; it's a pinched theology consumed with sexuality but also taking a variety of conservative positions - such as opposition to tax increases - that don't seem to have much to do with the Gospel. That hard-shell Christianity has as its standard-bearers such men as the Rev. Jerry Falwell, James Dobson and the Rev. Pat Robertson. The good news of this Christmas season is this: Not only have those theocrats seen their political influence erode with Republican losses in the midterm elections, but their brand of Christianity is also losing its monopoly on the public square.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | September 11, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Ralph Reed sits on the couch in the holding room, glancing every now and then at a TV set, watching who is speaking at the Christian Coalition's "Road to Victory" conference.Reed, the organization's executive director, is 33, but looks 15 years younger. He speaks in a quiet, straightforward and friendly manner.Some say this is all an act. Reed is, they say, a religious bigot and dangerous zealot, leading an organization that has a secret agenda to establish a theocracy in the United States and enslave us all.But Reed is not the first person I have talked to at this conference, he is one of the last.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 18, 1995
WASHINGTON -- Flanked by Republican congressional leaders, the conservative Christian Coalition unveiled a wide-ranging social agenda that proposes to curb abortion and pornography and guarantee the right to pray in schools and other public places.The "Contract with the American Family," as the coalition labeled its package of proposals, stands to cast divisive social issues into the legislative mix of the Republican-controlled Congress, which to date has concentrated on economic matters.
FEATURES
By Jeanne Cooper and Jeanne Cooper,Boston Globe | May 14, 1995
Ralph Reed: Christian crusader, cover boy. Time (May 15) calls the 33-year-old executive director of the Christian Coalition, an increasingly influential political advocacy group, a "choirboy to the rescue" for the religious right. More a preacher of fax and barnstorming than fire and brimstone, the protege of Jerry Falwell oversees an organization with 1.6 million active supporters and a $25 million annual budget, according to Jeffrey H. Birnbaum's cautionary profile. Those supporters attend monthly satellite downlinks on political organizing that teach them how to form "rapid-response networks" by phone, fax and modem.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 12, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In a move that highlights the Christian Coalition's close ties to the Republican majority in Congress, former Reagan Cabinet member Donald P. Hodel and former Rep. Randy Tate were named yesterday to run the nation's most powerful conservative religious organization.They will take over the duties of Executive Director Ralph Reed, who is leaving this summer to open a political consulting firm. The group's founder, evangelist Pat Robertson, announced the appointments in a ceremonial room at the Capitol, a few steps from the Senate floor.
NEWS
September 17, 1997
HAVING MADE debatable progress pushing an agenda, Ralph Reed will instead push candidates. Expect him to be successful. He's an organization man, the boy genius who used the rubble from Pat Robertson's failed 1988 run for the presidency to build the Christian Coalition.So media savvy has been this cherub-faced pol that newspapers accepted without question his claim of 1.9 million disciples. At its meeting Saturday to bid Mr. Reed adieu, the coalition put its paid membership at a mere 400,000.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 10, 1995
BOSTON -- Reaching across denominations to bolster its membership at the onset of the presidential campaign, the mostly Protestant Christian Coalition inaugurated a Catholic auxiliary yesterday with speeches that stressed unity for Christians on issues such as abortion and family values.On a morning of blustering snow in this New England stronghold of Irish and Italian Catholics, more than 400 people gathered at a hotel for the opening meeting of the Catholic Alliance, the new arm of the Christian Coalition, a conservative group founded by Pat Robertson.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 29, 2006
The president-elect of the Christian Coalition of America announced yesterday that he was stepping down, saying the group appeared to balk at his proposals to focus on environmental and anti-poverty issues rather than on purely "moralistic" issues such as abortion. The Rev. Joel C. Hunter, who was to have succeeded Roberta Combs on Jan. 1, said his departure was sparked by "just a basic philosophical difference." "I saw an opportunity to really broaden the conversation and broaden the constituency.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2005
The legislative session may have ended, but a battle over several bills critics say further gay rights is reaching an elevated pitch. Conservative and Christian groups are mounting a widespread effort - using e-mails and Web sites with often-fiery rhetoric - against four bills they charge promote the gay agenda. "Pray that God's will be done and that all the churches rise up against these bills," says an e-mail distributed to members of the Christian Coalition of Maryland. The bills passed the Senate and House of Delegates this session and are awaiting action - or inaction - from Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. before becoming law. Tres Kerns, executive director of VoteMarriage.
TOPIC
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2005
EASTER has always been one of those odd American religious holidays. It's a celebration with ubiquitous symbolism that acknowledges our country's Judeo-Christian roots and its roughly 80 percent Christian population. Yet growing diversity has, in the public sphere at least, softened the edges of its meaning. Easter is everywhere, but the spiritual notions of sacrifice and resurrection have been dulled into the shape of a soft and warm bunny. At least that was true of Easters past. This year, secularized rabbits have been overshadowed by the much more confrontational symbol of a strained face belonging to a brain-damaged woman who languishes in a Florida hospice.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | March 24, 2005
DULUTH, Ga. - Over the years, Ralph Reed has built an extraordinarily successful career as political organizer and campaign strategist. Almost single-handedly, as executive director of the Christian Coalition in the late 1980s and 1990s, he turned religious conservatives into a powerful force within the Republican Party. More recently, he was southern chairman of President Bush's re-election drive. Now, he's making a midlife course change. Still baby-faced at 43, and with few gray strands on his neatly coifed head, Reed is putting together a statewide campaign on behalf of a candidate who has never run for public office before: himself.
NEWS
By Janice D'Arcy and Janice D'Arcy,SUN STAFF | January 19, 2005
Forget the stress and last-minute headaches from President Bush's first inauguration. This time, Michelle Ammons is wrapping herself in her mother's fox-collared dress, stepping into the most exclusive of inaugural balls and celebrating. "This year we want to go and just enjoy the inaugural," said the Christian Coalition executive staff member. "They've taken very good care of us." In 2001, she and her colleagues were largely outside the official festivities, working hard to hold their own events, trying to prove their political mettle.
NEWS
July 23, 2003
William R. "Bill" Bright, 81, who founded Campus Crusade for Christ on the University of California-Los Angeles campus in 1951 and built it into an Evangelical Christian movement with branches in 191 countries, died Saturday of complications from pulmonary fibrosis at his home in Orlando, Fla. His religious fervor and a family tradition of supporting Republican candidates found expression in the Christian Embassy he established in Washington in the...
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 30, 1995
WASHINGTON -- When word spread recently that Republican leaders might water down a big tax break for families with children, not a peep of protest was heard from the business lobbyists who scrutinize most tax changes with a microscope.Instead, it was the Christian Coalition that turned up the heat, firing off letters of protest to Senate Finance Committee Republicans.A day later, the plan vanished. "They weren't just a vocal advocate for that tax credit -- they were the principal sponsors," said Stephen Moore, an economist who attended key early GOP strategy sessions on the federal budget overhaul.
NEWS
August 9, 1996
FOR RALPH REED, director of the Christian Coalition, the drafting of the Republican platform this week was a glorious victory. Undeterred by the Federal Election Committee's challenge to his organization's political tactics, he emerged as the most powerful non-delegate in San Diego.His control of the GOP Platform Committee was so decisive he ran roughshod over the wishes of presidential candidate Robert Dole by imposing a tough anti-abortion plank and relegating pro-choice views to an "appendix" about as useful as the human organ of the same name.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Christine Tatum and Christine Tatum,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 19, 2003
CHICAGO - Spam-fighters are pushing a new way to stop junk e-mail that mirrors the "do not call" lists aimed at curbing telemarketers' annoying phone solicitations. Sen. Charles E. Schumer, a New York Democrat, introduced a measure last week that would establish a national "do not e-mail" registry and penalize marketers who refuse to honor it. The anti-spam legislation would require the Federal Trade Commission to construct a system that informs marketers of consumers' wishes. Companies that send messages to e-mail addresses listed in the national registry could be fined $5,000 per e-mail per day. The penalties could be even more severe for spammers who send unsolicited messages to minors, including pornographic e-mail.
NEWS
By Robert O. Freedman | April 17, 2003
AS THE war in Iraq ends, there are growing pressures on the Bush administration to move ahead with the "road map" that lays a path to an Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement. These pressures come from America's Arab allies, especially Egypt, Jordan and Saudi Arabia, which were shaken by the war, and from Britain, the major U.S. ally in the conflict. Opposition to the road map comes from conservatives in Israel, especially such members of the coalition government as the National Religious Party and the National Union Party, and from the right wing in the American Jewish community and the Christian Coalition.
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