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Christa Mcauliffe

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NEWS
January 28, 1996
An article in yesterday's editions about the Challenger space shuttle disaster included a photograph of astronaut Judy Resnik instead of the person named in the story and caption, astronaut-schoolteacher Christa McAuliffe (above).The Sun regrets the error.
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NEWS
By Jim Stratton and Jim Stratton,Orlando Sentinel | August 7, 2007
ORLANDO, Fla. -- When space shuttle Challenger blew up, Barbara Morgan watched from a NASA viewing area as seven friends and colleagues - including fellow teacher Christa McAuliffe - plunged to their deaths. Seventeen years later, when Columbia disintegrated over Texas, Morgan was in a NASA plane waiting to escort the ship home. She had been scheduled to fly on its next mission. Now it's Morgan's turn to board a shuttle, and she is unfazed by past tragedies. When Endeavour lifts off - the launch is set for tomorrow - the teacher-turned-astronaut will be strapped into the orbiter and hurled skyward by almost 7 million pounds of thrust.
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NEWS
November 7, 1990
A $33,000 grant will be awarded to the Maryland teacher selected to participate in the 1991 Christa McAuliffe Fellowship.The yearlong fellowship, which is open to all public and private school teachers, was created to allow teachers to go on sabbatical for study or research, consultation with or assistance to a school district or private school system, or development of an innovative instructional program or model teacher program.The federally funded program was created in memory of Christa McAuliffe, the teacher-astronaut killed when the space shuttle Challenger exploded in 1986.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2002
NASA has finally set the date that former Idaho grade school teacher Barbara R. Morgan has waited for since 1986. NASA officials said yesterday that Morgan, 51, will fly and teach aboard the space shuttle Columbia on an 11-day mission to the International Space Station to be launched Nov. 13. Her intensive training for the mission will begin in a few weeks. Morgan was the understudy for NASA's first "Teacher in Space," Christa McAuliffe, who died aboard the shuttle Challenger almost 17 years ago. McAuliffe and her six crewmates were killed when a seal on the shuttle's solid fuel booster rocket failed, triggering an explosion that destroyed the spacecraft.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 13, 2002
NASA has finally set the date that former Idaho grade school teacher Barbara R. Morgan has waited for since 1986. NASA officials said yesterday that Morgan, 51, will fly and teach aboard the space shuttle Columbia on an 11-day mission to the International Space Station to be launched Nov. 13. Her intensive training for the mission will begin in a few weeks. Morgan was the understudy for NASA's first "Teacher in Space," Christa McAuliffe, who died aboard the shuttle Challenger almost 17 years ago. McAuliffe and her six crewmates were killed when a seal on the shuttle's solid fuel booster rocket failed, triggering an explosion that destroyed the spacecraft.
NEWS
By Nancy Lawson and Nancy Lawson,Evening Sun Staff | January 28, 1991
Being at the top of a mountain is not as exhilarating to Kathleen Beres as climbing it.And being among the stars, a lifelong dream of Beres' ever since the launching of Sputnik, is no more fun than reaching for them, she said."
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | July 11, 1994
Tonight's TV schedule contains a lot of space -- in more ways than one.* "Day One" (8-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Unless ABC jettisons the prepared pieces of this final "Day One" and goes with the latest on the O. J. Simpson case instead, this hour will contain a report by Robert Krulwich -- who always makes even arcane subjects seem interesting -- on what we don't know about the 1969 moon landing. ABC.* "The Nanny" (8-8:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Great stunt casting: Renee Taylor guest stars as Fran's mom (Fran Drescher)
NEWS
By William J. Broad and William J. Broad,New York Times News Service | September 8, 1993
Christa McAuliffe, the high school teacher who died in the fiery explosion of the space shuttle Challenger in January 1986, told her family the day before the launching that NASA had decided to push ahead the next day no matter what, her mother writes.That account, in a new book by Mrs. McAuliffe's mother, Grace George Corrigan, lends weight to arguments that NASA pressed ahead with the high-profile flight to win mention of it in President Ronald Reagan's State of the Union message.The address was scheduled for that day, Jan. 28, but then postponed after the spacecraft exploded, killing the seven crew members.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jack W. Germond | May 14, 1991
BEFORE THE saga of White House chief of staff Joh Sununu's frequent flying at taxpayer expense passes into the footnotes of history, it may be worth pointing out one aspect that tells something of the mind-set of some of the folks who are running the country right now. They're all for volunteerism -- when it's somebody else's.Among the flights Sununu took on military planes were two that carried him in the winters of 1990 and 1991 to New Hampshire, the state he once governed and still calls home.
NEWS
By Jim Stratton and Jim Stratton,Orlando Sentinel | August 7, 2007
ORLANDO, Fla. -- When space shuttle Challenger blew up, Barbara Morgan watched from a NASA viewing area as seven friends and colleagues - including fellow teacher Christa McAuliffe - plunged to their deaths. Seventeen years later, when Columbia disintegrated over Texas, Morgan was in a NASA plane waiting to escort the ship home. She had been scheduled to fly on its next mission. Now it's Morgan's turn to board a shuttle, and she is unfazed by past tragedies. When Endeavour lifts off - the launch is set for tomorrow - the teacher-turned-astronaut will be strapped into the orbiter and hurled skyward by almost 7 million pounds of thrust.
NEWS
January 28, 1996
An article in yesterday's editions about the Challenger space shuttle disaster included a photograph of astronaut Judy Resnik instead of the person named in the story and caption, astronaut-schoolteacher Christa McAuliffe (above).The Sun regrets the error.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | July 11, 1994
Tonight's TV schedule contains a lot of space -- in more ways than one.* "Day One" (8-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Unless ABC jettisons the prepared pieces of this final "Day One" and goes with the latest on the O. J. Simpson case instead, this hour will contain a report by Robert Krulwich -- who always makes even arcane subjects seem interesting -- on what we don't know about the 1969 moon landing. ABC.* "The Nanny" (8-8:30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Great stunt casting: Renee Taylor guest stars as Fran's mom (Fran Drescher)
NEWS
By William J. Broad and William J. Broad,New York Times News Service | September 8, 1993
Christa McAuliffe, the high school teacher who died in the fiery explosion of the space shuttle Challenger in January 1986, told her family the day before the launching that NASA had decided to push ahead the next day no matter what, her mother writes.That account, in a new book by Mrs. McAuliffe's mother, Grace George Corrigan, lends weight to arguments that NASA pressed ahead with the high-profile flight to win mention of it in President Ronald Reagan's State of the Union message.The address was scheduled for that day, Jan. 28, but then postponed after the spacecraft exploded, killing the seven crew members.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover and Jack W. Germond | May 14, 1991
BEFORE THE saga of White House chief of staff Joh Sununu's frequent flying at taxpayer expense passes into the footnotes of history, it may be worth pointing out one aspect that tells something of the mind-set of some of the folks who are running the country right now. They're all for volunteerism -- when it's somebody else's.Among the flights Sununu took on military planes were two that carried him in the winters of 1990 and 1991 to New Hampshire, the state he once governed and still calls home.
NEWS
By Nancy Lawson and Nancy Lawson,Evening Sun Staff | January 28, 1991
Being at the top of a mountain is not as exhilarating to Kathleen Beres as climbing it.And being among the stars, a lifelong dream of Beres' ever since the launching of Sputnik, is no more fun than reaching for them, she said."
NEWS
November 7, 1990
A $33,000 grant will be awarded to the Maryland teacher selected to participate in the 1991 Christa McAuliffe Fellowship.The yearlong fellowship, which is open to all public and private school teachers, was created to allow teachers to go on sabbatical for study or research, consultation with or assistance to a school district or private school system, or development of an innovative instructional program or model teacher program.The federally funded program was created in memory of Christa McAuliffe, the teacher-astronaut killed when the space shuttle Challenger exploded in 1986.
NEWS
By Orlando Sentinel | August 7, 2007
Some teachers - and their students - face physical risks just showing up at school in some of the more dangerous neighborhoods in our country. In comparison, astronauts live very safe lives."
NEWS
By Matt Zapotosky, The Washington Post | October 13, 2011
A 19-year-old Bowie State University student accused of stabbing and killing her suitemate after a dispute over music was indicted Thursday on charges of murder and carrying a dangerous weapon openly. Alexis Simpson had been jailed since last month, when she was arrested in connection with the Sept. 15 slaying of 18-year-old Dominique Frazier. Police have said that Simpson turned off an iPod that was playing in the suite, then stabbed Frazier in the neck after the two got into a fight about it. Frazier and Simpson were suitemates in Bowie State University's Christa McAuliffe residence hall and had ongoing tensions, police have said.
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