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By Greg Kot and Greg Kot,Chicago Tribune | September 18, 1991
Chris Whitley, a 31-year-old nomad who has never lived more than six years in any one place, has released an album that's as tough to pin down as his past.Mr. Whitley's "Living With the Law" (Columbia) is slip-between-the-cracks music -- not quite rock, not exactly blues, a stone's throw from country.It's also one of the year's best albums in any category. One of its songs, "Kick the Stones," became the soundtrack for a torrid love scene in the hit movie "Thelma & Louise." And the album has already earned Mr. Whitley opening slots on prestigious tours by Bob Dylan and Tom Petty, with the latter due next Tuesday at the Capital Centre in Landover.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 7, 1995
BABY IT'S YOUThe Beatles (Capitol EP 58349)Here's a sure sign that Beatles fans are in for quite a year: A new Beatles EP to help usher in the 25th anniversary of the band's break-up. "Baby It's You" leads off with a cover of the Shirelles oldie, taken from the "Live at the BBC" album, then follows with three previously unreleased BBC performances. Two of the songs, "Devil in Her Heart" and "Boys," are remakes of girl-group hits that show off the Fab Four's debt to R&B vocal harmonizing. Though "Devil" is a feature for George Harrison, the real interest lies with John Lennon and Paul McCartney's supple backing vocals, especially McCartney's lithe falsetto.
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FEATURES
September 19, 1991
The area concert calendar includes:Hammerjacks welcomes Big Audio Dynamite (Saturday and Sunday), House of Freaks and School of Fish (Sept. 28), Hoodoo Gurus (Sept. 29) and White Trash ( Oct. 4).The Capital Centre hosts Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers and Chris Whitley (Tuesday), Van Halen and Alice In Chains (Oct. 17) and George Michael (Oct. 31).Pier Six finishes its season this week with Little Feat (Sunday) and Kathy Mattea and Restless Heart (Sept. 27).Steeltown has the Village People (Oct.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 24, 1991
Chris Whitley's debut album, "Living with the Law," isn't like most rock music these days. Sure, it draws from the same sources and uses the same instruments, but his music produces an entirely different effect. Other singers may be content with making you move your body, but what Whitley wants is to stir your soul.That's not an easy thing to do, obviously, but so far, Whitley's success has been heartening. "Living with the Law" is already one of the most critically acclaimed debuts of the year, and with the singer on tour with Tom Petty (they play the Capital Centre this evening)
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 7, 1995
BABY IT'S YOUThe Beatles (Capitol EP 58349)Here's a sure sign that Beatles fans are in for quite a year: A new Beatles EP to help usher in the 25th anniversary of the band's break-up. "Baby It's You" leads off with a cover of the Shirelles oldie, taken from the "Live at the BBC" album, then follows with three previously unreleased BBC performances. Two of the songs, "Devil in Her Heart" and "Boys," are remakes of girl-group hits that show off the Fab Four's debt to R&B vocal harmonizing. Though "Devil" is a feature for George Harrison, the real interest lies with John Lennon and Paul McCartney's supple backing vocals, especially McCartney's lithe falsetto.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 24, 1991
Chris Whitley's debut album, "Living with the Law," isn't like most rock music these days. Sure, it draws from the same sources and uses the same instruments, but his music produces an entirely different effect. Other singers may be content with making you move your body, but what Whitley wants is to stir your soul.That's not an easy thing to do, obviously, but so far, Whitley's success has been heartening. "Living with the Law" is already one of the most critically acclaimed debuts of the year, and with the singer on tour with Tom Petty (they play the Capital Centre this evening)
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | September 5, 1991
With the 1991 summer concert season winding down -- the worst stretch for touring acts in more than a decade -- some bands that found themselves packing up and heading home to lick their wounds two months ago now must pick up the pieces and try again.For Cinderella, a Philadelphia band that has had three consecutive platinum albums, the trauma from getting sent home four weeks ago in the midst of a failed tour with David Lee Roth has been mild."We did better than a lot of bands," said lead singer/songwriter Tom Keifer, whose band will play Hammerjacks tonight in the first of nine club dates to warm up for a 10-date tour of Japan at the end of the month.
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | September 12, 1991
In the music business, perception is everything.For the Boston band Extreme, whose music veers mainly toward a funky hard rock style, the release of the single "More Than Words" six months ago was almost a frantic, desparate push for a hit single.It just so happens that the ballad, which features Gary Cherone's lilting tenor over the acoustic strains of Nuno Bettencourt's guitar, has streaked up the charts to No. 1 and has been the year's most played song on the radio.Even the title of the album, "Pornograffitti," suggests something other than what should be heard on mix radio.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | November 2, 2006
Hometown -- Frederick Current members --Shane Gamble (pictured), guitar and vocals; Dave Hadley, pedal steel; Jamie Watkins, drums; Patrick Thornton, bass Founded in --2001 Style --American roots Influenced by --Tom Petty, Wilco, Chris Whitley, Bob Dylan Notable --This summer, Gamble had a residency at Seacrets, Ocean City's mammoth outdoor beach club. The exposure boosted his fan base and allowed him to tour farther into the Mid-Atlantic region, he said. Quotable --"I think the sound just kind of struck people as just unique enough to create a buzz," Gamble said.
FEATURES
By J.D. CONSIDINE | April 19, 1998
One of the reasons I find contemporary blues so disappointing is that few modern bluesmen bring anything truly "modern" to the blues. Rather than use unexpected harmonies or try new ideas, they rehash licks that were old when John Lee Hooker was in diapers.Thank God for Chris Whitley. Although his tools - dobro, bottleneck, stomping foot - are standard-issue for country blues, his approach is anything but traditional. Applying the finger-picking and slide techniques of classic country blues to the sort of harmonic and melodic ideas you'd expect from Joni Mitchell or U2, his songs bypass the usual she-done-me-wrong cliches to wrestle with the angst and alienation of the MTV era.Hear for yourself on his new album, "Dirt Floor" (Messenger)
FEATURES
September 19, 1991
The area concert calendar includes:Hammerjacks welcomes Big Audio Dynamite (Saturday and Sunday), House of Freaks and School of Fish (Sept. 28), Hoodoo Gurus (Sept. 29) and White Trash ( Oct. 4).The Capital Centre hosts Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers and Chris Whitley (Tuesday), Van Halen and Alice In Chains (Oct. 17) and George Michael (Oct. 31).Pier Six finishes its season this week with Little Feat (Sunday) and Kathy Mattea and Restless Heart (Sept. 27).Steeltown has the Village People (Oct.
FEATURES
By Greg Kot and Greg Kot,Chicago Tribune | September 18, 1991
Chris Whitley, a 31-year-old nomad who has never lived more than six years in any one place, has released an album that's as tough to pin down as his past.Mr. Whitley's "Living With the Law" (Columbia) is slip-between-the-cracks music -- not quite rock, not exactly blues, a stone's throw from country.It's also one of the year's best albums in any category. One of its songs, "Kick the Stones," became the soundtrack for a torrid love scene in the hit movie "Thelma & Louise." And the album has already earned Mr. Whitley opening slots on prestigious tours by Bob Dylan and Tom Petty, with the latter due next Tuesday at the Capital Centre in Landover.
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | September 12, 1991
In the music business, perception is everything.For the Boston band Extreme, whose music veers mainly toward a funky hard rock style, the release of the single "More Than Words" six months ago was almost a frantic, desparate push for a hit single.It just so happens that the ballad, which features Gary Cherone's lilting tenor over the acoustic strains of Nuno Bettencourt's guitar, has streaked up the charts to No. 1 and has been the year's most played song on the radio.Even the title of the album, "Pornograffitti," suggests something other than what should be heard on mix radio.
FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | September 5, 1991
With the 1991 summer concert season winding down -- the worst stretch for touring acts in more than a decade -- some bands that found themselves packing up and heading home to lick their wounds two months ago now must pick up the pieces and try again.For Cinderella, a Philadelphia band that has had three consecutive platinum albums, the trauma from getting sent home four weeks ago in the midst of a failed tour with David Lee Roth has been mild."We did better than a lot of bands," said lead singer/songwriter Tom Keifer, whose band will play Hammerjacks tonight in the first of nine club dates to warm up for a 10-date tour of Japan at the end of the month.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | August 3, 2000
Miles Davis On the Corner (Columbia/Legacy 63980) Get Up With It (Columbia/Legacy 63970) One week in 1970, Miles Davis' "Bitches Brew" climbed to No. 38 on the Billboard albums chart, making it the most successful title of Davis' career. The album was an astonishing achievement. Commercially, "Bitches Brew" put Davis back on the map after a decade in which his angular, intellectualized approach to jazz was thought to have lost ground to the politically progressive black nationalism of John Coltrane and his disciples.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | November 1, 1999
KANSAS CITY, Mo. -- At $5,400, the 1995 shiny, blue Volkswagen Golf seemed to be a steal, or so thought Helen Chappell and her son when they bought it in the spring from the federal government.But two months later the engine quit. Suspecting a fuel problem, a mechanic at a Kansas City garage checked the gas tank -- where he found $82,000 in more than a dozen plastic bundles.The Chappells thought they had won the lottery.The federal government did not.U.S. Attorney Stephen Hill has filed a complaint in federal court, saying the money should go to the Department of Justice because the car and cash might have been used in illegal drug activity three years ago.Jeffrey Chappell, Helen Chappell's son, contends that they should get the money because they bought the car "as is."
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