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NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2001
The Rev. Jesse Jackson once said it was attitude, not aptitude, that ultimately determined altitude. But these days - because of the combined fortitude of a few educators -students from Howard County schools can ascend to the highest point in the world without leaving their desks. As part of a program called "Shared Summits," students at several county schools have been following online the exploits of Chris Warner, the veteran mountaineer from Oella who is scheduled to reach the peak of Mount Everest - the world's highest mountain - today.
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BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2012
For more than two decades, Chris Warner's business has taken him into a death zone 26,240 feet above sea level, where oxygen is thin, the weather is cruel and a single stumble can be fatal. A certified alpine guide, Warner has led nearly 200 international mountaineering expeditions. He is one of only nine U.S. climbers to reach the summits of Mount Everest and K2, the world's two highest peaks. Warner, 48, is the founder and owner of three Earth Treks climbing centers in Maryland, the co-author of two business books, and a teacher of leadership skills at universities and numerous corporations.
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NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | August 24, 1999
Chris Warner left for the roof of the world yesterday carrying three duffel bags stuffed with mountaineering gear, and the best wishes of two local schools tucked next to his heart.Nine months from now, he hopes to stand atop Mount Everest, planting the flags of Elkridge Elementary School, Howard County, and Park School, Baltimore, in the snow.Warner will climb five other peaks in Asia and South America, with his expeditions incorporated into both schools' curriculum on the Internet.Communicating by e-mail, Warner will talk to pupils about cultures, geography, geology and economics, and send digital photographs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Diane Scharper and Diane Scharper,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 21, 2008
Songs for the Butcher's Daughter By Peter Manseau Free Press / 370 pages / $25 Peter Manseau's novel creates a Marc Chagall-like world of pathos, humor and enchantment. Beginning in 19th-century Russia and ending in 1990s Baltimore, the plot concerns a library of Yiddish language books on Lombard Street near Corned Beef Row in Baltimore's former Jewish District. The collection, aptly called "The Library of Broken Dreams," suggests the tale's bittersweet territory. Manseau chronicles the origin of these books from the perspective of Itsik Malpesh, a nonagenarian Yiddish poet, and his 20-something Christian translator whose job rescuing Jewish books leads him to Malpesh's life story.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | November 23, 2008
Chris Warner has cheated the death zone, where oxygen is thin and the weather brutal, to stand atop the world's two highest peaks, Mount Everest and K2 - the only Marylander to have done so. The Annapolis resident and certified Alpine guide owns Earth Treks, with climbing gyms in Columbia, Timonium and Rockville, and leads expeditions of business school students on team-building outings to the high peaks of South America and Africa. With Don Schmincke, a Maryland-based business consultant, Warner has written a book, "High Altitude Leadership: What the World's Most Forbidding Peaks Teach Us About Success."
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2012
For more than two decades, Chris Warner's business has taken him into a death zone 26,240 feet above sea level, where oxygen is thin, the weather is cruel and a single stumble can be fatal. A certified alpine guide, Warner has led nearly 200 international mountaineering expeditions. He is one of only nine U.S. climbers to reach the summits of Mount Everest and K2, the world's two highest peaks. Warner, 48, is the founder and owner of three Earth Treks climbing centers in Maryland, the co-author of two business books, and a teacher of leadership skills at universities and numerous corporations.
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | May 23, 2001
Jesse Jackson once said it was attitude, not aptitude, that ultimately determined altitude. But these days - because of the combined fortitude of a few educators - students from Howard County schools can ascend to the highest point in the world without leaving their desks. As part of a program called "Shared Summits," students at several county schools have been following online the exploits of Chris Warner, the veteran mountaineer from Oella who is scheduled to reach the peak of Mount Everest - the world's highest mountain - today.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Reporter | May 31, 2007
While most Marylanders kick back this summer and relax at the beach or the swimming pool, Chris Warner will be grappling with a mountain that chews up and spits out most adventurers. Twice, K2 has flicked away Warner's advances with a powerful display of biting cold, brutal winds and treacherous avalanches that earned the world's second-highest peak the nickname "The Savage Mountain." For a third time, the Maryland mountaineer is taking up temporary residence at its base, hoping to tag the top of Pakistan's 28,251-foot peak somewhere around July 4, using a route no one has conquered.
FEATURES
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN OUTDOORS WRITER | May 30, 2001
Chris Warner is not the same man he was before he left in March for Mount Everest. For one thing, he's a member of an elite club of 1,000 climbers who have made it to the top of the 29,035-foot mountain. For another, he's 30 pounds lighter for the effort. And, after a near-disaster just below the summit that almost took the lives of two climbing friends, he says, "I'm not the optimist I was when I left home." But he still has his sense of humor, answering the satellite phone yesterday at his tent at 17,200 feet: "Everest Base Camp Pizzeria."
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2000
For 20 years, Chris Warner has been preparing for the Death Zone. Soon he'll find out if he's done enough to survive. If Warner does everything right, if the brutal cold and physical pain don't crush him, if the weather smiles on him for a few days, he hopes to stand atop Mount Everest in the Himalayas in mid- to late May. And if he is successful, it is believed he will be the first Marylander to rise above it all. "You have to be a little bit off...
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | November 23, 2008
Chris Warner has cheated the death zone, where oxygen is thin and the weather brutal, to stand atop the world's two highest peaks, Mount Everest and K2 - the only Marylander to have done so. The Annapolis resident and certified Alpine guide owns Earth Treks, with climbing gyms in Columbia, Timonium and Rockville, and leads expeditions of business school students on team-building outings to the high peaks of South America and Africa. With Don Schmincke, a Maryland-based business consultant, Warner has written a book, "High Altitude Leadership: What the World's Most Forbidding Peaks Teach Us About Success."
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | July 21, 2007
Under a cobalt-blue sky that seemed just beyond reach, Chris Warner placed his boots yesterday on the snow-encrusted summit of K2, the world's second-highest mountain, where few others have gone and that he had only pictured in his dreams. Just three days shy of his 43rd birthday, Warner, an Annapolis resident and owner of three Baltimore-area climbing gyms, became the first Marylander to stand atop both 28,253-foot K2 and Mount Everest, 782 feet higher. It took more than 15 hours for Warner and more than a dozen other climbers to cover the 1,850 vertical feet from Camp 4 to the summit, plowing through chest-deep snow, picking their way across ancient ice slabs and hauling themselves up slopes that reached an 80-degree pitch.
SPORTS
July 6, 2007
Watch video reports of Chris Warner and the Shared Summits team at baltimoresun.com/k2
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun reporter | July 6, 2007
Few women have husbands who punch the clock in the "Death Zone." But when Melinda Warner married Maryland's top mountaineer nearly three years ago, she knew a large portion of every year would be spent waiting for her spouse to return from on high. This week is no different as Chris Warner gets closer to his goal of adding K2, the world's second-highest mountain, to a resume that includes Mount Everest and other massive peaks. High winds and plummeting temperatures yesterday forced the climbers to retreat to base camp and await the next window of good weather.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Reporter | May 31, 2007
While most Marylanders kick back this summer and relax at the beach or the swimming pool, Chris Warner will be grappling with a mountain that chews up and spits out most adventurers. Twice, K2 has flicked away Warner's advances with a powerful display of biting cold, brutal winds and treacherous avalanches that earned the world's second-highest peak the nickname "The Savage Mountain." For a third time, the Maryland mountaineer is taking up temporary residence at its base, hoping to tag the top of Pakistan's 28,251-foot peak somewhere around July 4, using a route no one has conquered.
SPORTS
By Baltimoresun.com Staff | August 2, 2005
Like tea leaves, just about everyone has examined today's forecasts in hopes of finding either a summit window or an excuse to head home. The best two days are, arguably, Saturday and Sunday. One forecast shows summit wind speeds ranging from 17 to 11 knots per hour. A second forecast shows winds at 35-40 knots per hour. All the forecasts show some very cold temperatures. While everyone is wrestling with their options, Tao and I have decided to try to climb to at least the "Shoulder" of K2. The route on the SSE Ridge, has been climbed to 7,300 meters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN OUTDOORS WRITER | April 29, 2001
Last year, Chris Warner came within 4,035 feet of standing on top of the world. This time, he's bringing a ladder. Sometime before the end of May, the veteran mountaineer from Baltimore County hopes to reach the peak of Mount Everest, the world's highest mountain. It is believed he would be the first Maryland resident to make the 29,035-foot summit. The challenge is immense. Just 981 people have surmounted Everest, which straddles Tibet and Nepal (about 300, mostly guides, have made multiple trips)
FEATURES
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2000
ELLICOTT CITY - For Nepalese Sherpa Ram Chandra Sunuwar, conquering Mount Everest is an everyday experience. Learning the ins and outs of Western life this summer - shopping at Target, gambling at casinos and driving a car - have been much bigger challenges. Now Ram is about to head home again. But not before his U.S. stay with local mountaineer Chris Warner is toasted at a beer tasting Monday, one that will raise funds for a new school in Ram's home village of Khijiphalate in Nepal. Monday night at the Ellicott Mills Brewing Co. on Main Street, proceeds from the first sales of a limited-run Everest Lager will go toward the school project, aimed at giving 300 children in Ram's remote village a weatherproof structure and more teachers.
SPORTS
By Chris Warner and Chris Warner,Special to Baltimoresun.com | August 1, 2005
The weather forecasts through Aug. 6 call for storm force winds on the summit of K2. This is obvious from base camp. Lenticular clouds sit upon the summit, their leeward edges curling back like eddies in the jet stream. The visual effect is of an evil bird grabbing with it's talons for any climber foolish enough to approach K2's top. Lower down, loose snow is blowing from the SSE and Abruzzi ridges. The mood at base camp is somber. Some teams, like the Norwegians, have been here for more than 60 days.
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