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By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2011
Chris Tucker is taking time off from not doing "Rush Hour" movies to go on a stand-up tour, Live Nation announced Monday. Tucker will hit 18 cities on the tour, his first time on the road, probably, since he started making movie money. In Washington, he will perform October 7 at the same venue his "Money Talks" co-star Charlie Sheen played in April, D.A.R. Constitution Hall. Hopefully, he'll actually have written material prepared Tickets, which start at $44, go on sale Friday.
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By Erik Maza and The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2011
Chris Tucker is taking time off from not doing "Rush Hour" movies to go on a stand-up tour, Live Nation announced Monday. Tucker will hit 18 cities on the tour, his first time on the road, probably, since he started making movie money. In Washington, he will perform October 7 at the same venue his "Money Talks" co-star Charlie Sheen played in April, D.A.R. Constitution Hall. Hopefully, he'll actually have written material prepared Tickets, which start at $44, go on sale Friday.
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By Lisa Wiseman and Lisa Wiseman,Special to The Sun | June 22, 1994
"Is this Baltimore?" comedian Chris Tucker asks midway through his phone conversation. The 22-year-old comic, who is appearing tomorrow at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, is calling from his home state of Georgia, and he sounds a little tired and half asleep.He swears he didn't just wake up at 2 in the afternoon, but for a man who describes his comedic stylings as "explosive and powerful," Mr. Tucker sounds laid back. Almost too laid back -- especially for a man who is best known for his appearances on HBO's "Def Comedy Jam."
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | August 10, 2007
The only thing that's up-to-date about Rush Hour 3 is the way that 53-year-old Jackie Chan shows his age. As Chief Inspector Lee, the sly Hong Kong counterpart to Chris Tucker's motor-mouthed, exhibitionist L.A. cop James Carter, Chan demonstrates how a martial artist can segue into pure entertainer with a little help from his friends. Chan still wrings laughs from outrageous derring-do, but he's more willing than ever to detonate a visual punch line by actually getting punched or by helping Tucker prove (or improve)
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | August 10, 2007
The only thing that's up-to-date about Rush Hour 3 is the way that 53-year-old Jackie Chan shows his age. As Chief Inspector Lee, the sly Hong Kong counterpart to Chris Tucker's motor-mouthed, exhibitionist L.A. cop James Carter, Chan demonstrates how a martial artist can segue into pure entertainer with a little help from his friends. Chan still wrings laughs from outrageous derring-do, but he's more willing than ever to detonate a visual punch line by actually getting punched or by helping Tucker prove (or improve)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1998
Jackie Chan has fast hands. Chris Tucker has a fast mouth. Together, they make fast work of "Rush Hour," an enjoyable enough take on the odd-couple-as-police-partners theme (think "48 HRS" or "Lethal Weapon").Chan is Inspector Lee, a police detective who opens the film hard at work beating the bejeebers out of the entire Hong Kong underworld (as always, Chan's a joy to behold when he lets his reflexes do the talking). He's successful, but not entirely: When a local crime lord takes his bag of tricks to Los Angeles and arranges for the kidnapping of the Chinese consul's 11-year-old daughter, Lee is summoned to help the FBI find her.But the FBI wants no part of his help, and that's where James Carter (Tucker)
FEATURES
By Dave Michaels and Dave Michaels,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | August 22, 1997
As the summer clock ticks down, Hollywood is doing its version of the two-minute drill, hoping to score by tossing buddy movies into theaters.In "Money Talks," Charlie Sheen, as dapper TV news prince James Russell, is all ready to wed an heiress (Heather Locklear). And Chris Tucker, a car-wash kid and free-lance grifter named Franklin Hatchett, is living "ghetto fabulous." But James decides the people have the right to know about Franklin's racket and exposes his hustle on camera.Franklin lands in prison, where he spurns a hefty cellmate suitor and squawks lines from "Scarface" to French diamond smuggler Villard (Gerard Ismael)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 3, 2001
Jackie Chan is an athletic marvel with a self-effacing charm. Chris Tucker is a very funny guy. And 1998's Rush Hour was an unforced little gem of a buddy film, an East-meets-West comedy evincing good chemistry between its stars and enough laughs to keep the customers satisfied. So what happened to Rush Hour 2? The chemistry between Chan and Tucker is pretty much a memory. The laughs are still there, but they come mostly in the form of shtick, performed by Tucker and often having little connection to the rest of the movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rick Holter and Rick Holter,Dallas Morning News | April 28, 1995
"Friday" sports an ice-cream truck driver who deals a lot more than Nutty Buddies, a character plagued by angel-dust flashbacks and an uncomfortably realistic drive-by shooting.And those are the jokes, folks.The movie is rapper-actor Ice Cube's attempt to inject some humor into the 'hood. The message from the veteran of such gritty dramas as "Boyz N the Hood," "Trespass" and "Higher Learning" is clear: People in South Central Los Angeles, like those anywhere else, depend on laughs to get them through the day. And he's behind this effort full-force, as star, co-writer and co-executive producer.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 9, 2002
Make no mistake about it, MTV's Diary of Bono and Chris Tucker: Aiding Africa is advocacy journalism with a capital A. Come to this one-hour documentary about a journey through Africa led by an actor and a rock star expecting objectivity and dispassion, and you will be disappointed. But let yourself go with the MTV-style flow of the piece, and you'll be impressed with how much information, context, point of view and compassion can be packed into 60 enlightened minutes of non-fiction television.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,Sun reporter | February 1, 2007
CHEVY CHASE -- As Maryland Nighthawks owner Tom Doyle spoke glowingly of the player he hopes can create buzz for his minor league team and the struggling American Basketball Association, the object of his admiration stood close by, looking down at the assembled media - from way up high. At 7 feet 9, Sun Ming Ming had no choice in that matter. The Nighthawks have declared Sun, 23, a native of Bayan, China, the tallest player in professional basketball history. And they plan to unveil their latest project and largest threat Saturday night against the Strong Island Sound at their Montgomery College home court in Rockville.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 14, 2005
SANTA MARIA, Calif. - Recording superstar Michael Jackson returned to his Neverland Ranch a free man yesterday after a jury cleared him of charges that he had plied a 13-year-old cancer patient with alcohol, molested him, then conspired to imprison the boy and his family. The verdict brought vindication for the embattled performer, whose close relationships with young boys have been questioned for more than a decade. Jackson, 46, had previously paid multimillion-dollar settlements to two accusers, and he had told a British TV interviewer that his sleepovers with children were a "beautiful thing."
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 9, 2002
Make no mistake about it, MTV's Diary of Bono and Chris Tucker: Aiding Africa is advocacy journalism with a capital A. Come to this one-hour documentary about a journey through Africa led by an actor and a rock star expecting objectivity and dispassion, and you will be disappointed. But let yourself go with the MTV-style flow of the piece, and you'll be impressed with how much information, context, point of view and compassion can be packed into 60 enlightened minutes of non-fiction television.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown and Sloane Brown,Special to the Sun | September 29, 2002
Bet you've never quite seen a party guest list like this one: Harlequin Great Dane, English sheepdog, golden retrievers, Pembroke Welsh corgi, Rottweilers, bulldog, Petit Brussels Griffon Vendeen, standard poodles, toy poodle and cairn terrier. And those were just some of the 40 to 50 canine guests at the "Black Tie and Tails" gala that celebrated the 75th anniversary of the Humane Society of Baltimore County. The Humane Society's Diane Kesler says the pooches joined some 200 human guests at the Sheraton North Hotel in Towson for the formal affair.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 3, 2001
Jackie Chan is an athletic marvel with a self-effacing charm. Chris Tucker is a very funny guy. And 1998's Rush Hour was an unforced little gem of a buddy film, an East-meets-West comedy evincing good chemistry between its stars and enough laughs to keep the customers satisfied. So what happened to Rush Hour 2? The chemistry between Chan and Tucker is pretty much a memory. The laughs are still there, but they come mostly in the form of shtick, performed by Tucker and often having little connection to the rest of the movie.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 1999
EYES FILLED with tears, voice trembling, Hugh M. Roper read aloud from a Western Union telegram sent 58 years ago: "Am safe. Unharmed." And below that message in his mother's handwriting: "Thank God for this.""I'm sorry," Roper, 78, said to 13-year-old Chris Tucker. "This is extremely emotional for me. This is the first notice they had, five days after the attack."Dated Dec. 12, 1941, the telegram was sent by Roper from Hawaii to his family in Baltimore to tell them that he had survived the bombing of Pearl Harbor.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 10, 1999
EYES FILLED with tears, voice trembling, Hugh M. Roper read aloud from a Western Union telegram sent 58 years ago: "Am safe. Unharmed." And below that message in his mother's handwriting: "Thank God for this.""I'm sorry," Roper, 78, said to 13-year-old Chris Tucker. "This is extremely emotional for me. This is the first notice they had, five days after the attack."Dated Dec. 12, 1941, the telegram was sent by Roper from Hawaii to his family in Baltimore to tell them that he had survived the bombing of Pearl Harbor.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,Sun reporter | February 1, 2007
CHEVY CHASE -- As Maryland Nighthawks owner Tom Doyle spoke glowingly of the player he hopes can create buzz for his minor league team and the struggling American Basketball Association, the object of his admiration stood close by, looking down at the assembled media - from way up high. At 7 feet 9, Sun Ming Ming had no choice in that matter. The Nighthawks have declared Sun, 23, a native of Bayan, China, the tallest player in professional basketball history. And they plan to unveil their latest project and largest threat Saturday night against the Strong Island Sound at their Montgomery College home court in Rockville.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1998
Jackie Chan has fast hands. Chris Tucker has a fast mouth. Together, they make fast work of "Rush Hour," an enjoyable enough take on the odd-couple-as-police-partners theme (think "48 HRS" or "Lethal Weapon").Chan is Inspector Lee, a police detective who opens the film hard at work beating the bejeebers out of the entire Hong Kong underworld (as always, Chan's a joy to behold when he lets his reflexes do the talking). He's successful, but not entirely: When a local crime lord takes his bag of tricks to Los Angeles and arranges for the kidnapping of the Chinese consul's 11-year-old daughter, Lee is summoned to help the FBI find her.But the FBI wants no part of his help, and that's where James Carter (Tucker)
FEATURES
By Dave Michaels and Dave Michaels,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | August 22, 1997
As the summer clock ticks down, Hollywood is doing its version of the two-minute drill, hoping to score by tossing buddy movies into theaters.In "Money Talks," Charlie Sheen, as dapper TV news prince James Russell, is all ready to wed an heiress (Heather Locklear). And Chris Tucker, a car-wash kid and free-lance grifter named Franklin Hatchett, is living "ghetto fabulous." But James decides the people have the right to know about Franklin's racket and exposes his hustle on camera.Franklin lands in prison, where he spurns a hefty cellmate suitor and squawks lines from "Scarface" to French diamond smuggler Villard (Gerard Ismael)
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