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By Bob Strauss and Bob Strauss,Los Angeles Daily News | April 18, 1995
When Minnie Driver first read the script for the Irish period romance "Circle of Friends," she immediately fell in love with the central female role of Bernadette."
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By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN REPORTER | August 5, 2007
THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY and its ever-present story lines of spies and lies are all over the media these days. The release of New York Times reporter Tim Weiner's history of the agency, Legacy of Ashes, last month was met with critical acclaim, while a whirlwind of Page 1 stories greeted the CIA's release of its own 25-year narrative of coups and assassination attempts, known as The Family Jewels. In all, more than a dozen books about the CIA have been published in the past six months.
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FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1999
Cheerful and unpretentious, "The Bachelor" is a lightweight concoction that works best when it remembers it's supposed to be a comedy, less well when it tries to get at universal truths through the laughs.Fortunately, the film doesn't do that often, and when it does (as, for instance, when it tries to make some point about men's and women's views on romance), it moves on fairly quickly, before any real damage is done.It also never loses sight of its main strength: the chemistry between stars Chris O'Donnell and Renee Zellweger, who look so good up there together on the screen, you really hope these kids can make it work.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 5, 1999
Cheerful and unpretentious, "The Bachelor" is a lightweight concoction that works best when it remembers it's supposed to be a comedy, less well when it tries to get at universal truths through the laughs.Fortunately, the film doesn't do that often, and when it does (as, for instance, when it tries to make some point about men's and women's views on romance), it moves on fairly quickly, before any real damage is done.It also never loses sight of its main strength: the chemistry between stars Chris O'Donnell and Renee Zellweger, who look so good up there together on the screen, you really hope these kids can make it work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Staff Writer | May 26, 1995
In the foothills of the Cascades outside of Seattle, Matt (Chris O'Donnell) scans the night sky studying the stars. Hearing an unexpected noise, he trains his telescope on the lake below his house. What he sees is Casey (Drew Barrymore), a young, beautiful girl cavorting as if she were a mermaid on jet skis.That opening is much the best thing about "Mad Love," Antonia Bird's film about the ecstasies and agonies of first love. If opposites do attract, one surely understands why Matt and Casey are drawn to each other.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick and Scott Hettrick,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | July 30, 1993
SCENT OF A WOMAN(MCA/UNIVERSAL, rated R, 1992)It would be difficult to quibble with the Academy Award Al Pacino won for his performance in "Scent of a Woman." He so dominates the picture that one might wonder if the film could have survived without him.In fact, the nominations the film received for Best Picture and Best Director are laughable. This film has serious problems. The story was apparently so strong that it carried the film despite some serious lapses by director Martin Brest.The first problem is the characterization of Charlie, a 17-year-old boy who has moved from Oregon, where his parents run a convenience store, to an East Coast prep school.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | July 6, 1997
FOR ALL OF her 11 years, I have been preaching and posturing for my daughter a life of education, meaningful work and financial independence in an effort to balance her inclination to dress up stuffed animals and stage weddings.I have encouraged her in sports -- four seasons of empty water bottles, dirty uniforms and practice times that are also mealtimes -- to promote physical confidence and courage and to slow her premature rush toward makeup, pantyhose and high heels.Wow, have I failed or what?
FEATURES
By Bob Strauss and Bob Strauss,Los Angeles Daily News | May 14, 1995
The stakes are higher than ever in this year's summer movie game. After making a record $2.2 billion last summer, Hollywood is spending even more money than usual in the hopes of winning big.Six of this summer's major pictures -- paced by the most expensive movie ever, the reportedly $175 million "Waterworld" -- are estimated to have cost more than $70 million apiece. And that's not counting the huge advertising budgets of $20 million to $25 million that films such as "Batman Forever," "Judge Dredd," "Die Hard With a Vengeance," "First Knight" and "Braveheart" require just to find the audiences they need to break even.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN REPORTER | August 5, 2007
THE CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY and its ever-present story lines of spies and lies are all over the media these days. The release of New York Times reporter Tim Weiner's history of the agency, Legacy of Ashes, last month was met with critical acclaim, while a whirlwind of Page 1 stories greeted the CIA's release of its own 25-year narrative of coups and assassination attempts, known as The Family Jewels. In all, more than a dozen books about the CIA have been published in the past six months.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 25, 2009
Series The Chopping Block: : Each team has to create a dish using only ingredients found in Central Park. Jim and Nina Zagat guest star. (8 p.m., WBAL-Channel 11) American Idol: : The remaining finalists perform classic Motown songs, and Smokey Robinson and Berry Gordy help pay tribute to the Motown sound. (8 p.m., WBFF-Channel 45) South Park: : Everyone in town starts pointing fingers when it comes to who is responsible for the state of the economy. (10 p.m., Comedy Central) Movies Vertical Limit: : Chris O'Donnell plays a former mountain-climbing expert who returns to the Himalayas to try to rescue his sister (Robin Tunney)
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | July 6, 1997
FOR ALL OF her 11 years, I have been preaching and posturing for my daughter a life of education, meaningful work and financial independence in an effort to balance her inclination to dress up stuffed animals and stage weddings.I have encouraged her in sports -- four seasons of empty water bottles, dirty uniforms and practice times that are also mealtimes -- to promote physical confidence and courage and to slow her premature rush toward makeup, pantyhose and high heels.Wow, have I failed or what?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Staff Writer | May 26, 1995
In the foothills of the Cascades outside of Seattle, Matt (Chris O'Donnell) scans the night sky studying the stars. Hearing an unexpected noise, he trains his telescope on the lake below his house. What he sees is Casey (Drew Barrymore), a young, beautiful girl cavorting as if she were a mermaid on jet skis.That opening is much the best thing about "Mad Love," Antonia Bird's film about the ecstasies and agonies of first love. If opposites do attract, one surely understands why Matt and Casey are drawn to each other.
FEATURES
By Bob Strauss and Bob Strauss,Los Angeles Daily News | May 14, 1995
The stakes are higher than ever in this year's summer movie game. After making a record $2.2 billion last summer, Hollywood is spending even more money than usual in the hopes of winning big.Six of this summer's major pictures -- paced by the most expensive movie ever, the reportedly $175 million "Waterworld" -- are estimated to have cost more than $70 million apiece. And that's not counting the huge advertising budgets of $20 million to $25 million that films such as "Batman Forever," "Judge Dredd," "Die Hard With a Vengeance," "First Knight" and "Braveheart" require just to find the audiences they need to break even.
FEATURES
By Bob Strauss and Bob Strauss,Los Angeles Daily News | April 18, 1995
When Minnie Driver first read the script for the Irish period romance "Circle of Friends," she immediately fell in love with the central female role of Bernadette."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick and Scott Hettrick,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | July 30, 1993
SCENT OF A WOMAN(MCA/UNIVERSAL, rated R, 1992)It would be difficult to quibble with the Academy Award Al Pacino won for his performance in "Scent of a Woman." He so dominates the picture that one might wonder if the film could have survived without him.In fact, the nominations the film received for Best Picture and Best Director are laughable. This film has serious problems. The story was apparently so strong that it carried the film despite some serious lapses by director Martin Brest.The first problem is the characterization of Charlie, a 17-year-old boy who has moved from Oregon, where his parents run a convenience store, to an East Coast prep school.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun movie critic | July 2, 2008
The timing might be right for Kit Kittredge: An American Girl, a tale of a plucky young Cincinnati lass (Abigail Breslin) who triumphs as a girl reporter during the Great Depression. It's inspirational to see any movie about a grade-school girl who has some wits to keep about her. And Kit's attempt to maintain honor and high spirits while her dad (Chris O'Donnell) leaves Cincinnati to find work in Chicago should resonate with youngsters whose mother and father are searching for jobs while canceling or cutting short vacations and road trips.
FEATURES
April 9, 1999
The highest crime in "Cookie's Fortune" comes in the form of a string of unpaid parking tickets. Make that the second-highest crime. Because when the elderly Cookie Orcutt (Patricia Neal) meets her reward midway through the film, her death is interpreted as a murder. Cookie's decadently crumbling house is suddenly awash in yellow police tape, thanks to the efficient work of police lieutenant Lester Boyle (Ned Beatty) and rookie Jason Brown (Chris O'Donnell). And Cookie's family is thrown into something of a tizzy.
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