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By Lou Cedrone | May 28, 1991
The mother in ''Only the Lonely'' is an impossible woman, someone only a son could love. A first-generation bigot, she is a woman who hates everybody who isn't Irish. The fact that we can tolerate her, can appreciate the film that surrounds her, is tribute to the talents of Chris Columbus, who wrote and directed, and John Hughes, who produced.It was Hughes who wrote ''Home Alone,'' which Columbus also directed. ''Home Alone'' may be the funnier movie, but ''Only the Lonely'' is the better film, an all-round film that doesn't resort to the humor of the Three Stooges.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2010
"Home Alone" premiered in 1990 and swiftly became the third-highest-grossing film up to that time. Leaning hard on the sensitive-brat charm of 8-year-old Macaulay Culkin, it convulsed family audiences — and some slapstick and cartoon fans, too — with its tale of a boy literally left behind in the Christmas rush when his family flies off to Paris without him. My theory is that producer-writer John Hughes hired Chris Columbus to direct because of...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Josh Mooney | November 29, 1991
SOAPDISHParamount Home VideoPriced for rental"Soapdish" is a fast-paced, slightly mad comedy about the behind-the-scenes antics of the cast and crew of a fictional daytime drama, "The Sun Also Sets." The film, written by Robert Harling and Andrew Bergman, and directed by Michael Hoffman, throws large handfuls of gags against the wall, and plenty of them stick.Sally Field is super as Celeste, America's reigning soap queen sweetheart who begins to realize that she's getting older -- and makes life a living hell for everyone else as a result.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Josh Mooney | November 29, 1991
SOAPDISHParamount Home VideoPriced for rental"Soapdish" is a fast-paced, slightly mad comedy about the behind-the-scenes antics of the cast and crew of a fictional daytime drama, "The Sun Also Sets." The film, written by Robert Harling and Andrew Bergman, and directed by Michael Hoffman, throws large handfuls of gags against the wall, and plenty of them stick.Sally Field is super as Celeste, America's reigning soap queen sweetheart who begins to realize that she's getting older -- and makes life a living hell for everyone else as a result.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | December 21, 1990
HOLLYWOOD -- Though she left the movie business 17 years ago, Maureen O'Hara can never really leave Hollywood. Too many of her films are classics and TV staples, including a certain holiday perennial about a gent named Kris Kringle.Reminiscing about "Miracle on 34th Street" (1947), O'Hara says, "We knew we were making a good movie -- the script was so wonderful, and there was such rapport among the cast -- but no one had any idea that the film would be with us, well, forever."Indeed, just weeks ago, as O'Hara walked home from church in New York City, a child asked her: "Aren't you the lady who knows Santa Claus?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 16, 1990
'Home Alone'Starring Macaulay Culkin and Joe Pesci.Directed by Chris Columbus.Released by 20th Century Fox.Rated PG. Imagine Alfalfa starring in a Disney remake of that classic of psychotic territoriality, Sam Peckinpah's ultra-violent "Straw Dogs," and you've got a fair approximation of "Home Alone."In Peckinpah's bleak vision of the human condition, a mild liberal wimp hiding from reality on a Cornish farm finally freaked when some British rednecks tried to break into his house: Using everything from a bear trap to a shotgun to boiling water, he waged total war and snuffed them all.In this version, a cute tyke played by Macaulay Culkin is accidentally left home over Christmas vacation, when the house is assailed by two less-than-brilliant thieves.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2010
"Home Alone" premiered in 1990 and swiftly became the third-highest-grossing film up to that time. Leaning hard on the sensitive-brat charm of 8-year-old Macaulay Culkin, it convulsed family audiences — and some slapstick and cartoon fans, too — with its tale of a boy literally left behind in the Christmas rush when his family flies off to Paris without him. My theory is that producer-writer John Hughes hired Chris Columbus to direct because of...
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 6, 2009
Series Friday Night Lights: : Jason (Scott Porter) follows a job opportunity to New York and Riggins (Taylor Kitsch) goes along for the ride. (9 p.m., WBAL-Channel 11) Bill Moyers Journal: : John Lithgow; Geraldine R. Dodge Poetry Festival. (9 p.m., WETA-Channel 26) NUMB3RS:: The team investigates the death of an innovative scientist. (10 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13) Movies Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone: : A young wizard in training (Daniel Radcliffe) becomes the target of an unknown enemy while being schooled in the use of magic, in director Chris Columbus' 2001 big- screen version of the J.K. Rowling fantasy.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | April 9, 1991
HOLLYWOOD -- John Hughes, who wrote and produced ''Home Alone,'' (Chris Columbus directed), is incredulous over the success of the $18.2 million production. It had sold $257.5 worth of tickets as of the middle of last week and is about to become the third-highest grossing movie ever."Who would have guessed it?" he asks, comparing it to his previous efforts, such as "Ferris Bueller's Day Off" and other teen-oriented pictures that have reached plateaus of $70 million -- but never beyond. His newest film, "Career Opportunities," which he also wrote and produced, is, in his view, "a disappointment" because "I didn't have my usual creative control."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Josh Mooney and Josh Mooney,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 23, 1991
HOME ALONEFoxVideo$24.98This surprise hit of last Christmas is the reason you'll be seeing so many comedies on screen in the weeks and months to come (Hollywood likes to replicate the latest mega-hit). Without the benefit of major stars, producer/writer John Hughes and director Chris Columbus turned Mr. Hughes' 17th screenplay into the third-largest grossing film in American box-office history, thereby silencing critics who had suggested that Mr. Hughes had run out hits.The film is essentially a big, colorful, loud "Three Stooges" episode, minus one Stooge, and plus the enjoyable screen presence of young Macauley Culkin.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | May 28, 1991
The mother in ''Only the Lonely'' is an impossible woman, someone only a son could love. A first-generation bigot, she is a woman who hates everybody who isn't Irish. The fact that we can tolerate her, can appreciate the film that surrounds her, is tribute to the talents of Chris Columbus, who wrote and directed, and John Hughes, who produced.It was Hughes who wrote ''Home Alone,'' which Columbus also directed. ''Home Alone'' may be the funnier movie, but ''Only the Lonely'' is the better film, an all-round film that doesn't resort to the humor of the Three Stooges.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | December 21, 1990
HOLLYWOOD -- Though she left the movie business 17 years ago, Maureen O'Hara can never really leave Hollywood. Too many of her films are classics and TV staples, including a certain holiday perennial about a gent named Kris Kringle.Reminiscing about "Miracle on 34th Street" (1947), O'Hara says, "We knew we were making a good movie -- the script was so wonderful, and there was such rapport among the cast -- but no one had any idea that the film would be with us, well, forever."Indeed, just weeks ago, as O'Hara walked home from church in New York City, a child asked her: "Aren't you the lady who knows Santa Claus?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 16, 1990
'Home Alone'Starring Macaulay Culkin and Joe Pesci.Directed by Chris Columbus.Released by 20th Century Fox.Rated PG. Imagine Alfalfa starring in a Disney remake of that classic of psychotic territoriality, Sam Peckinpah's ultra-violent "Straw Dogs," and you've got a fair approximation of "Home Alone."In Peckinpah's bleak vision of the human condition, a mild liberal wimp hiding from reality on a Cornish farm finally freaked when some British rednecks tried to break into his house: Using everything from a bear trap to a shotgun to boiling water, he waged total war and snuffed them all.In this version, a cute tyke played by Macaulay Culkin is accidentally left home over Christmas vacation, when the house is assailed by two less-than-brilliant thieves.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bob Longino and Bob Longino,COX NEWS SERVICE | April 10, 2003
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets could be worse. It could be Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. Actually, there's a lot that's solid about the second Potter movie, which, as only parental fools don't know, comes out tomorrow on DVD and video. The special effects are much improved from the first film (the Quidditch game looks and feels like a bona-fide match; the scary spiders are really pretty scary), the acting is better (especially sidekick Rupert Grint as Ron Weasley) and Secrets really moves, whereas the first flick just sort of started, sputtered and sank like a stone.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | July 10, 2009
What's refreshing about I Love You, Beth Cooper isn't just that the debate-team captain emotionally connects with the cheerleading captain. It's also that the cheerleader may be the deepest character - and that the actor who plays her plainly gives the best performance. Since that gifted, attractive performer is Hayden Panettiere, who has already won a wide following for Heroes, it's a wonder that the studio hasn't been more heavily promoting her appearance in this decent, genial youth comedy.
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