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SPORTS
By Ray Frager | November 3, 2008
Monday Night Football 8:30 p.m. [ESPN, Ch. 20] The game should be fine - Pittsburgh Steelers at Washington Redskins - but it's the halftime spectacle to look forward to. On the eve of the election, presidential hopefuls John McCain and Barack Obama (right) will appear in taped interviews with Chris Berman. What kind of wacky nicknames will he give them? Will he ask them where they stand on the Brett Favre/Green Bay Packers split? Just think of all those undecideds who could tip one way or the other based on how the candidates react to Berman's grilling.
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SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | November 28, 2008
As delicious as those leftovers are, you could enjoy them even more. Rather than just scarfing them down whenever the spirit moves you, why not try making a game of it? In the fashion of drinking games tied to television shows, you could link your eating to your sports TV viewing. Have a slice of turkey, a forkful of mashed potatoes or a piece of pecan pie each time: * Brent Musburger over-enthuses about the game he is calling. * Chris Berman makes a pop-culture reference at least 30 years old. * Jim Palmer mentions how he never gave up a grand slam.
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SPORTS
January 4, 2005
Today we learn the results of balloting for the Baseball Hall of Fame. Unfortunately, the Hall of Fame has become too much about numbers. As fans know, baseball and its players are about much more than numbers. Mr. Flip did not vote, but he hopes the members of the Baseball Writers' Association of America who did took all important factors into account. And those factors would include these bits of information about the candidates that may not have made it into their biographies. Tom Candiotti: Portrayed the Orioles' Hoyt Wilhelm in the HBO movie 61*. Steve Garvey: Appeared as a judge on The Gong Show and in the movie BASEketball.
SPORTS
By Ray Frager | November 3, 2008
Monday Night Football 8:30 p.m. [ESPN, Ch. 20] The game should be fine - Pittsburgh Steelers at Washington Redskins - but it's the halftime spectacle to look forward to. On the eve of the election, presidential hopefuls John McCain and Barack Obama (right) will appear in taped interviews with Chris Berman. What kind of wacky nicknames will he give them? Will he ask them where they stand on the Brett Favre/Green Bay Packers split? Just think of all those undecideds who could tip one way or the other based on how the candidates react to Berman's grilling.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | November 28, 2008
As delicious as those leftovers are, you could enjoy them even more. Rather than just scarfing them down whenever the spirit moves you, why not try making a game of it? In the fashion of drinking games tied to television shows, you could link your eating to your sports TV viewing. Have a slice of turkey, a forkful of mashed potatoes or a piece of pecan pie each time: * Brent Musburger over-enthuses about the game he is calling. * Chris Berman makes a pop-culture reference at least 30 years old. * Jim Palmer mentions how he never gave up a grand slam.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | July 30, 1993
ESPN has a home feel to BermanSports fans know Chris Berman. They watch him on ESPN for the rapid-fire delivery, baseball player nicknames and arcane pop-music references.Waiters know Chris Berman. One asks him to autograph his baseball cap during lunch.Even Tom Selleck knows Chris Berman. Mr. Baseball stops by to offer greetings in a hotel restaurant.That's quite a jump for a guy who started by giving scores to people who couldn't sleep.Other than Dick Vitale, Berman is ESPN's most recognized personality.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | November 12, 1996
Asking Chris Berman to comment on your "SportsCenter" audition tape is a lot like getting a grade on a fingerpainting from Michelangelo. Berman is, after all, the master of the form. But in true, nice-guy fashion, he was willing to give my tape a thorough going-over as we sat together in an ESPN office last Friday.Right off the bat, he noticed a resemblance to Denver defensive lineman Michael Dean Perry, and gave me a "Good job" on my intro to the Dallas-Indianapolis football highlight.I earned my first demerit for being caught on camera looking down at the monitor in the desk as I prepared to narrate the highlights.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | November 16, 1990
The TV repairman:MODERN DAY philosophers have been debating why or how the "Skins Game" ends up as the second highest-rated golf show on television for years (about two). To Curtis Strange, defending champ in the show scheduled for Nov. 25 (3:30 to 6 p.m. on ABC), the answer is simple: "The viewers want something different from time to time."Think back. Shell's Wonderful World of Golf was very popular. Then there was that match-play tournament CBS conducted for years."Joining Strange in the charge for $450,000 in prize money are Greg Norman, Nick Faldo and Jack Nicklaus, "not a comedian in the bunch," reminds Curtis, "and we're going live this time.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | June 15, 2007
Johnny Miller owns one of the most famous rounds in the history of golf's major championships - the 63 he shot at Oakmont on the last day to win the 1973 U.S. Open. With the Open back at Oakmont this week and NBC there to chronicle it, the topic of Miller's performance 34 years ago was bound to come up. But, in typical Miller fashion, the network's No. 1 golf commentator won't say that marks him as a player to rank with Tiger Woods. "If anybody studied my career, I was like Jekyll and Hyde," Miller said, according to highlights of a conference call this week.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | September 6, 1995
For Chris Berman, the waiting has been the hardest part.Moments after the American League schedule was released in the spring, Berman, the signature voice of ESPN, checked it to see which day Cal Ripken was due to set the consecutive-games-played mark of 2,131.When he saw the date, Sept. 6, and the day it fell on, a Wednesday, an ESPN telecast night, Berman knew he would be a witness to history."We never thought we'd be in a position to show something like this, for those of us who have been there from the start," said Berman, who will call tonight's game with Buck Martinez.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER and RAY FRAGER,ray.frager@baltsun.com | September 12, 2008
Offering a dose of weekly sports media notes while typing with a stiff neck from having turned my head every time another replay of Tom Brady's injury hit the screen: * Kevin Harlan, who called the Ravens opener on CBS, does at least a couple of things that recommend him as a play-by-play man. He regularly mentions blocks by offensive linemen and he alertly notes defensive packages that feature extra defensive backs. Offensive linemen often get mentioned only when they commit penalties or have trouble containing a pass rusher who has just flattened the quarterback.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | June 15, 2007
Johnny Miller owns one of the most famous rounds in the history of golf's major championships - the 63 he shot at Oakmont on the last day to win the 1973 U.S. Open. With the Open back at Oakmont this week and NBC there to chronicle it, the topic of Miller's performance 34 years ago was bound to come up. But, in typical Miller fashion, the network's No. 1 golf commentator won't say that marks him as a player to rank with Tiger Woods. "If anybody studied my career, I was like Jekyll and Hyde," Miller said, according to highlights of a conference call this week.
SPORTS
January 4, 2005
Today we learn the results of balloting for the Baseball Hall of Fame. Unfortunately, the Hall of Fame has become too much about numbers. As fans know, baseball and its players are about much more than numbers. Mr. Flip did not vote, but he hopes the members of the Baseball Writers' Association of America who did took all important factors into account. And those factors would include these bits of information about the candidates that may not have made it into their biographies. Tom Candiotti: Portrayed the Orioles' Hoyt Wilhelm in the HBO movie 61*. Steve Garvey: Appeared as a judge on The Gong Show and in the movie BASEketball.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | September 7, 1999
It's been 13 years since anyone got Chris Berman to thinking seriously about pulling up stakes and leaving ESPN, and the bait nearly lured him 3,000 miles across the country.Berman, who started with ESPN about a month after its Sept. 7, 1979, launch, recently recalled a two-pronged assault from the San Francisco Bay area that got him thinking about leaving.KGO, the ABC-owned-and-operated station in San Francisco, contacted Berman with an offer to be the main sports anchor with a raise that would have taken his salary into six figures.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | May 20, 1999
The accepted wise-guy response for the guy who missed either the memo that the Beatles broke up or the one declaring tie-dyed shirts and Afro hairstyles out of style is, "Hey, pal, the '60s are that way."For a couple of hours tomorrow, during ESPN's "SportsCenter of the Decade, 1960s" (7: 30 p.m.), Chris Berman is taking that long, strange trip back to the days of free love, Peter, Paul and Mary, and the days when pitchers in both leagues actually had to swing a bat."We had a growing of the country, figuratively and literally, and sports was a part of it," Berman said yesterday.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | November 12, 1996
Asking Chris Berman to comment on your "SportsCenter" audition tape is a lot like getting a grade on a fingerpainting from Michelangelo. Berman is, after all, the master of the form. But in true, nice-guy fashion, he was willing to give my tape a thorough going-over as we sat together in an ESPN office last Friday.Right off the bat, he noticed a resemblance to Denver defensive lineman Michael Dean Perry, and gave me a "Good job" on my intro to the Dallas-Indianapolis football highlight.I earned my first demerit for being caught on camera looking down at the monitor in the desk as I prepared to narrate the highlights.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | May 20, 1999
The accepted wise-guy response for the guy who missed either the memo that the Beatles broke up or the one declaring tie-dyed shirts and Afro hairstyles out of style is, "Hey, pal, the '60s are that way."For a couple of hours tomorrow, during ESPN's "SportsCenter of the Decade, 1960s" (7: 30 p.m.), Chris Berman is taking that long, strange trip back to the days of free love, Peter, Paul and Mary, and the days when pitchers in both leagues actually had to swing a bat."We had a growing of the country, figuratively and literally, and sports was a part of it," Berman said yesterday.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER | February 4, 1994
They made him wear funny shirts and leather jackets. They sat him next to a guy who smacks a hammer on the desk. They put him on a network whose programming staple is snowboarders sliding to heavy-metal music.All of this apparently drove Keith Olbermann to shave off his mustache.But soon his nightmare will be over. Olbermann will leave ESPN2 and return to ESPN on April 3, it was announced this week.Olbermann will rejoin Dan Patrick to re-form ESPN's best "SportsCenter" anchor team, and they will be hosts of an expanded "SportsCenter."
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | September 6, 1995
For Chris Berman, the waiting has been the hardest part.Moments after the American League schedule was released in the spring, Berman, the signature voice of ESPN, checked it to see which day Cal Ripken was due to set the consecutive-games-played mark of 2,131.When he saw the date, Sept. 6, and the day it fell on, a Wednesday, an ESPN telecast night, Berman knew he would be a witness to history."We never thought we'd be in a position to show something like this, for those of us who have been there from the start," said Berman, who will call tonight's game with Buck Martinez.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | July 17, 1995
Let's face it: Unless you're into golf, infomercials, professional wrestling, syndicated shows or retread movies, Saturday afternoon television is a fetid wasteland.That is, except for the saving grace of baseball. Yes, the grand old game has taken its lumps of late, but the term "couch potato" was invented with Saturday afternoon baseball in mind.A bag of chips, a lovely beverage, a remote control device and a sofa. Who could ask for more?But, this weekend, for only the third time in the more than 125-year history of major-league baseball, there was not one Saturday afternoon game played, much less televised.
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