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Susan Reimer | February 19, 2014
If a husband takes on more chores, does a grateful wife repay his efforts with more sex? It might depend on which chores. Lori Gottlieb, a psychologist and author of "Marry Him: The Case for Settling for Mr. Good Enough," suggested in a New York Times Magazine article that partners in so-called peer marriages, or more equal marriages, report having less sex than partners in marriages where the husband and the wife perform more traditional duties....
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 19, 2014
If a husband takes on more chores, does a grateful wife repay his efforts with more sex? It might depend on which chores. Lori Gottlieb, a psychologist and author of "Marry Him: The Case for Settling for Mr. Good Enough," suggested in a New York Times Magazine article that partners in so-called peer marriages, or more equal marriages, report having less sex than partners in marriages where the husband and the wife perform more traditional duties....
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FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | June 28, 2005
A RECENT study published in the Journal of Marriage and Family shows that men do more housework than their wives give them credit for, and women actually do less than they think. The study also showed that men overestimate the amount of time their wives spend on household chores, suggesting either a genuine awareness of how much she does, or a complete capitulation to her claims and complaints. This can be dangerous information in the hands of the wrong person, if you know what I mean.
BUSINESS
Eileen Ambrose | June 12, 2013
You can't put a value on a father's love, but apparently you can put a price on the chores he does around the house. Insure.com looked at the traditional chores that fathers do at home and put a dollar figure to them using hourly wage data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. As it turns out, dear ol' dad's work amounts to $23,244, up nearly $3,096 from a year ago. “Dads benefited from wage increases for drivers, teachers, coaches and plumbers,” Insure.com's Amy Danise said in a statement.
FEATURES
By ALBANY TIMES UNION | March 9, 1999
American boys and girls do the same number of chores, but not the same kinds of chores, according to a survey in the March/April is sue of Zillions, the Consumer Reports magazine for kids.According to the survey of 1,000 children, gender roles continue to apply in the assigning of tasks. Boys mowed lawns and took out the trash more, while girls dominated in caring for younger siblings, meal preparation and housecleaning.All children surveyed did at least one chore weekly, and more than half performed five or more.
FEATURES
By LINDA LOWE MORRIS | April 25, 1992
It's always this way in the garden: You cool your heels for weeks waiting for the weather to warm. Then suddenly in April one beautiful day comes along. The trees seem almost to leaf out overnight. And from that moment on until . . . well, probably November . . . you can never get caught up with all the work.So here we are. That one beautiful day has come and gone. And there will never again be enough hours in the weekend to get everything done. Here is a list of chores (as if you needed more)
FEATURES
By Susan Hipsley and Susan Hipsley,Special to The Sun | January 15, 1995
"If it works in the workplace, why not take it home?" asks Ann McGee-Cooper, a Dallas time-management expert. She's extolling the time-saving graces of delegation at home. "You can get the family to help with chores -- and actually like it."Sharon Rippey, a 30-year-old Baltimore mother of three preschoolers who works full time, knows what Ms. McGee-Cooper is talking about.She and her husband delegate regularly in their children's lives. Five-year-old twins Gabrielle and Aurora put their clean laundry in clearly labeled drawers (socks, shirts, underwear)
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | December 31, 2000
THE BIBLE REPORTS that God rested on the seventh day, but that's only because grocery stores weren't open on Sundays back then. If God were working on creation today, he'd spend Saturdays running the kids around, and on the seventh day he'd wake up knowing he had better get to the grocery store before the bell clanged for work on Monday. Heaven knows, it's too tough to get that chore done during the week. While he was out, God might drop by the mall to pick up some birthday cards (all from the section marked "Belated")
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | October 23, 1994
For years, my husband and I covered sports, and, like the athletes we wrote about, we worked weekends. Our job descriptions have changed, and for the first time in our professional careers and the first time in our married life, we have weekends off.And we can't handle it.Two children who grew up with tag-team parenting ("Is it a Mommy Day or a Daddy Day?") suddenly have more adult supervision than they want.And two people who could go through an entire NFL season without sharing a meal suddenly find themselves with two days of togetherness in front of them -- and with two sets of priorities to be negotiated into one.We have joined the mainstream of American life, and we are swimming much too fast.
NEWS
By A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 13, 2000
Baltimore County police charged a 25-year-old Catonsville man yesterday with attempting to kill an 80-year-old woman who was his employer and his parents' neighbor. Dorothy Cherry, of the 100 block of Melrose Ave., was unconscious in her home when her daughter discovered her May 7. The side door had been kicked in and she had been badly beaten. Cherry was rushed to Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where she remained in critical condition yesterday. Police charged Braderick Thomas Greene of the first block of Winters Lane with attempted first-degree murder and with breaking and entering.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2012
The conventional wisdom is that allowances make children responsible money managers as they learn to budget so they don't run out of cash. But Lewis Mandell, professor emeritus of finance and former dean of business at the State University of New York in Buffalo, says that's not always the case. In fact, says Mandell, who has studied financial literacy, certain allowances may even be hurting kids. According to Mandell, high school students who didn't get an allowance performed better on a financial literacy test than those who did, especially teens who received stipends with no strings attached.
NEWS
September 6, 2011
After Hurricane Irene, power to my entire block in Hampden was out - except at my house, thanks to my solar panels. While the panels obviously didn't work during the night of the storm, by the next morning my fridge was still ice cold, my sump pump was back on and I was able to tend my yard without the din of a generator. By the time nightfall came and my panels were starting to switch off, I had been able to accomplish all my electric chores. I spent the rest of the day chatting with neighbors and enjoying a peaceful evening.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 21, 2011
Online budgeting sites aim to take the tedium out of money management, and the latest entry even tries to make a game of it with cash prizes. Budgeting is such a turnoff that some financial professionals won't even use the term with clients. But some online budgeting sites aim to take the tedium out of money management. And the latest entry even tries to make a game of it — with cash prizes. Payoff.com, which helps users manage their way out of debt, officially launched at the end of June.
EXPLORE
By Diane Browndmbrown@comcast.net | August 16, 2011
I was introduced to my first fascination with coupons on March 27, when I clicked on an advert on some website or another for DoubleTakeDeals. I probably should have known better, except words that were magic to my eyes popped up. David's Natural Market in Columbia was offering $30 worth of groceries for the remarkable price of 15 bucks. Half-price, man. Yeah, I can do that, while that little piece living on the left side of my brain was confirming yet again that sometimes you have to spend money to save money.
NEWS
By Rob Kasper and Rob Kasper,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | November 25, 2009
Making Thanksgiving dinner is a lot of work, but it is worth it. That - "It is worth it!" - is the mantra cooks should chant to get themselves mentally ready for the big day. There are also some steps the cook and kitchen helpers can take in these final hours to make the meal go smoothly. Here are some pre-meal maneuvers you can undertake today that will help prevent panic tomorrow. Sharpen your knives. : Carving the bird requires a sharp blade. Moreover, there is a lot of vegetable chopping that goes into the meal preparations.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2009
N othing motivates me to rake leaves quite like having a neighbor who has already done it. The juxtaposition of his bright-green lawn with my leaf-carpeted one highlights the fact that my turf needs to breathe; this sodden leaf layer must be suffocating poor Blade O'Grass and the rest of his family. So I assembled the tools - garden gloves, rake and trash bags - and attacked the yard with gusto last week. Initially, it was almost a meditative activity; the gentle scrape-scrape of the rake matched my breathing.
FEATURES
By Beverly Mills and Beverly Mills,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 30, 1997
We are having a difficult time teaching our 10-year-old daughter about chores. She'll agree to jobs, then she forgets or she does a poor job. We'd love to have some suggestions.F. HowardEden Prairie, Minn.It's not enough to say, "Go clean your room."To end up with children who cheerfully march off to do their chores, parents and experts agree that you'll need to be willing to invest some effort yourself.Start by explaining why it's important to do chores, teach your children what to do by breaking it down into steps and include them in deciding what their chores will be.Without this direction, children are likely to shove their toys and clothes under the bed and call it quits.
NEWS
By PEG ADAMARCZYK and PEG ADAMARCZYK,Special to the Sun | October 13, 1995
THE FALL festival season is in full swing in the Pasadena area, giving to a great opportunity to postpone those pesky fall cleanup chores (at least for a few hours).*The parish of St. Jane Frances in Riviera Beach opens its fall festival at 5 p.m. today, closing for the night at 11 p.m. The festival hours for the rest of the weekend are noon to 11 p.m. tomorrow and 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday.Attractions include midway rides, games of chance and skill for all ages, bingo with a 50/50 pot and a silent auction of vacations, dinners and homemade crafts.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,susan.reimer@baltsun.com | November 22, 2008
It is hard to be a dedicated gardener when the November winds arrive. It is so much easier to watch from the kitchen window as the last leaves fall while you're making a pot of soup. If the mosquitos of August keep you indoors, the cold rain of a November weekend certainly will as well. Besides, the holidays are coming at us like a speeding train, and the gardens drop to the bottom of a to-do list that now includes turkey-roasting and Christmas card-writing. I know what I should be doing in the garden this month.
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