Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChords
IN THE NEWS

Chords

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | March 26, 2003
O'Donel Levy plays a long, lovely solo on his guitar while a photographer dances aroudn him, searching for the definitive image of the jazz musician at work. Levy's a big man in a beret and a dark blue suit who improvises with taut concentration, funky force and spidery delicacy. As the solo ends, he's a bit winded. "Your heart just goes out through the strings," he says. "It's like everything you want to say you always seem to be able to say it better, speak better, through [the guitar]
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2013
— Until recently, Paul Reed Smith Guitars sold only American-made instruments for more than $2,000 and Korean-made guitars retailing for about $700. To fill the gap — and with something U.S.-made, no less — the Eastern Shore company needed a design that could go from wood to instrument in dramatically less time. Guitars in its core, high-end line take about 20 hours to manufacture. Finding efficiencies is tricky enough when you mass-produce widgets. Imagine the challenge for a company whose niche is high-quality guitars — instruments that have to look and sound good enough to tempt buyers away from the better-known Fender and Gibson brands.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | March 5, 2004
There was an announcement, then a little guitar playing and a promise of a whole lot more as officials from Towson University held a mid-morning news conference yesterday at Baltimore's Hard Rock Cafe in the Inner Harbor to release details of its World Guitar Congress, set for June 2-9. Towson says it has so far signed on nearly 50 professional guitarists from genres as diverse as jazz, flamenco, blues, rock and classical for the Guitar Congress, a...
NEWS
February 18, 2013
Much of President Barack Obama's State of the Union address this week was a fairly ho-hum affair, with the usual laundry list of programs and goals (most so familiar that it could have been a recycled campaign speech from 2012, or maybe 2008) and the customary reaction of cheering supporters and stone-faced critics. Until he turned to the subject of gun control. What had seemed routine, even pro forma, suddenly turned electric. Invoking speech attendees including the parents of Hadiya Pendleton, who was shot and killed in Chicago just days after the 15-year-old performed in the presidential inauguration; former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, who suffered a gunshot to the head two years ago; and relatives of the Newtown, Conn.
NEWS
By Michael Fedo and Michael Fedo,Christian Science Monitor | August 17, 1994
"Play, Papa," ordered Chelsea, my youngest grandchild, as she and her compatriots Cameron and Zoey, my other grandchildren, deposited a decomposing cardboard guitar case at my feet.Inside the case lay my 1960 Gibson flattop, which the kids had discovered in a spider-webby corner of the basement. I hadn't so much as looked at it in the past 15 years.Strings were missing, the neck was warped and the bridge had pulled away from the body. The instrument was beyond repair. The kids were keenly disappointed, especially after my wife told them I used to play professionally.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | February 14, 1998
Aretha Franklin, looking every inch the Queen of Soul in a doozy of a black felt hat bedecked with silver studs, is sitting at the piano. She's talking about Smokey Robinson -- singer, songwriter and genius.Franklin stops talking in mid-sentence, and her fingers take to the keyboard. She lays down a soft blanket of gospel chords -- slow, deliberate, seductive. It's the opening of "Tracks of My Tears," only it's done at a tempo less than half that of the Robinson classic, and it's juiced in the blues.
NEWS
November 17, 2011
If nothing else, state Comptroller Peter Franchot's objection to Bowie State University's purchase of 32 new Steinway pianos for the $79 million new performing arts center it will open next year shows the state's top financial watchdog has a tin ear for value. Who would spend that kind of money on a state-of-the-art music facility and then fill it with penny-whistle instruments? At a meeting of the state Board of Public Works on Wednesday, Mr. Franchot suggested the $553,264 price tag for the Steinway-designed pianos - a mix of concert, budget and entry-level instruments - was excessive at a time of fiscal austerity.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | February 24, 2005
Richard Maltby Jr. and David Shire's 1983 musical Baby is designed to appeal to anyone who's about to be a parent, has ever been a parent or just hopes to be a parent. In other words, it's got broad appeal. At Dundalk Community Theatre, that appeal is enhanced by a strong contingent of lead performers, who portray three couples at different stages in life - the central gimmick in Sybille Pearson's clever script. Lauren Spencer-Harris and Brent Bell play unmarried college students surprised to discover they're going to be parents.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 23, 1995
Of the scores of Annapolis Symphony concerts I've attended, none has been weirder than the one given at Maryland Hall on Saturday evening.The program was designed to show off the diverse talents of one of the ASO's favorite guests, Ruben Gonzalez, the distinguished co-concertmaster of the Chicago Symphony.Not only was Mr. Gonzalez to solo in the Beethoven Violin Concerto with Gisele Ben-Dor and her players, he also was to ascend the podium to conduct excerpts from one of his own compositions.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | June 25, 2002
Classical music has become little more than sonic wallpaper on many radio stations and in many concert halls across the country. It's all about very old, familiar tunes, preferably in feel-good major keys and requiring little intellectual stimulation. So New Chamber Festival Baltimore - devoted to ear-challenging, mind-grabbing 20th-century works for string quartet - packed the punch of a late-night summer thunderclap. The three-day fest, which concluded Saturday night, represented an extraordinarily thoughtful, coherent packaging of musical ideas.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2012
She emerged from the womb "like a froggy, ferny cabbage. " Some folks never did get over the shock of seeing the artichoke-colored baby, who grew up to be a fearsome threat to a girl from Kansas ... and her little dog, too. That green-skinned character known for generations only as the Wicked Witch of the West, thanks to the indelible 1939 film "The Wizard of Oz," turns out to have a name - Elphaba - and an eventful back story. How this witch ended up so witch-y is the subject of the multiple Tony Award-winning musical "Wicked," which "takes one of the iconic villains of our culture and turns it on its ear," said Marc Platt, the show's Pikesville-born producer.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | June 3, 2012
Recent headlines of interest from the campaign trail, class warfare division: •The Washington Post: "President Obama Wants It Both Ways on Private Equity" •The Hill: "Democrats Balk at Obama Campaign's Sustained Attack on Bain Capital" •Buzzfeed: "Obama Bundler Decries Vilification of Private Equity" •Politico: "More Dems Struggle on Bain" •Boston Herald: "Deval Patrick Says Bain 'Not A Bad Company'" The foregoing...
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2012
I will admit it, I came to the season premiere of "America's Got Talent" to rip Howard Stern. But I walk away after two hours with nothing but admiration for Stern and the producers of this potent franchise. And I'm not simply praising AGT as a slick or skilled production. "America's Got Talent" connects with some of the deepest currents of American life today. For all its sideshow, freakshow silliness and weirdness  at times, it also speaks to a huge slice of American life that our politicians don't seem to know or care about one little bit any more as they move from fund raiser to fund raiser and TV studio to soundstage in their cocoons of media and million-dollar isolation from the masses.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 29, 2012
When 17-year-old John Edwards was shot in the head on Edmondson Avenue this month, no one marched on City Hall. There were no comparisons to Emmett Till, no columns in national newspapers about the anxieties of growing up black and male in a country still haunted by racial divides. Baltimore Ravens did not wear hoodies in solidarity. On average, one juvenile a month has been the victim of homicide in Baltimore over the past three years. Many, like Edwards, were written about and discussed briefly, then forgotten by all but loved ones.
EXPLORE
By Katie V. Jones | December 4, 2011
As a member of Encore Community Music Association since its beginnings in 1995, Andrew Spang has played various instruments - and has even conducted the community band. This year, he's playing the French horn for the first time, and has the pleasure of sitting next to his son. "This is our first year doing it (together)," said Spang, of his 11-year-old, French horn playing son, Benjamin. "My daughter is in the string orchestra. This is her first year, too. It's really neat.
NEWS
November 17, 2011
If nothing else, state Comptroller Peter Franchot's objection to Bowie State University's purchase of 32 new Steinway pianos for the $79 million new performing arts center it will open next year shows the state's top financial watchdog has a tin ear for value. Who would spend that kind of money on a state-of-the-art music facility and then fill it with penny-whistle instruments? At a meeting of the state Board of Public Works on Wednesday, Mr. Franchot suggested the $553,264 price tag for the Steinway-designed pianos - a mix of concert, budget and entry-level instruments - was excessive at a time of fiscal austerity.
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | July 7, 2010
Well, that one struck a nerve. I speak here of the response to my Monday column on ballpark singers who turn the national anthem into a nightclub act with all their histrionics. Regular readers might recall that in the column, I wrote that I like to hear the anthem sung up-tempo and with great feeling. And that I like to hear it sung in a traditional manner. But that most of all, I like to hear it sung quickly -- 70 seconds, tops. Because I'm there to watch a ballgame, OK?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2011
"I was in love with music from the beginning," said Virginia Reinecke, who first played the piano at 6 and will give a performance Sunday at the age of 90. Make that 901/2 — she hit the big Nine-O last July. The Baltimore-born, Peabody-trained Reinecke will be featured in a concert for Music in the Great Hall, the series she co-founded in 1974 and ran for its first 30 years. The series "had some bad times in the past, like any organization," she said, "but the board is stronger now and [artistic director]
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2011
Matt Porterfield is a hard-knocks poet — a rhapsodist in black and blue — whose work gains strength from its Baltimore roots. Porterfield located his first two movies, 2007's "Hamilton" and his current "Putty Hill," quite ruthlessly in the Baltimore neighborhhoods that give these films their names. So acute is his focus on authentic textures and characters — and so revealing are the epiphanies he ignites on the fly — that these tales of working-class endurance and rebellion have reverberated around the world.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.