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By Sloane Brown | February 25, 2001
For an intimate evening of cabaret entertainment, the setting was perfect. Candles flickered and soft lighting gave F. Scott Black's Towson Dinner Theatre a cozy warmth, as folks filtered in for the Baltimore Choral Arts Society's Evening With Eric Comstock. A glass of wine, a little supper from the buffet and an easy chat with old friend Choral Arts music director Tom Hall continued the warm-up to the night's performance by the man who's been called "the heir apparent to Bobby Short." In the comfortable crowd of 150: Andrea Bowman-Moore, event chair; Oz Bengur and Richard Dellheim, event committee members; Arnold Paskoff, Baltimore Choral Arts Society board president; Linda Goldberg, Ellen Clayton, George L. Good, John Hilgenberg, Dayle Jones, Peter Savage and Dr. Alan Sweatman, board members; Sandra Smith, Choral Arts executive director; Susan Mathias, Goucher College counsel; Chris Wallace, Baltimore speech language pathologist; Jay Brooks, Salomon SmithBarney first vice president; Fran Lessans, Passport Health president; David Kornblatt, Kornblatt Co. president; Linda Davis, Calverton School principal; Janet Marie Smith, Struever Bros.
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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 30, 2013
Last weekend saw two more entries in Baltimore's 2013-14 music season, each yielding rewards. Saturday night at the Gordon Center, Concert Artists of Baltimore offered an unusual pairing -- Schubert on the first half, Rachmaninoff and Prokofiev on the second. If there was a secret to the combination, artistic director Edward Polochick didn't make it clear in his lengthy, sometimes fuzzy remarks woven throughout the evening (like most of us, he could use an editor). What mattered in the end, though, was all the stylish music-making.
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FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | November 15, 1993
What do Rodney Carroll, Paige Davis, John Ebersberger, Beth Fiske, Betsey Heuisler, Barbara Kassel, Philip Koch, Raoul Middleman, Bennard Perlman, Amalie Rothschild, Tammra Sigler and Leonard Streckfus have in common?No, not just that they're all artists. They are all represented in the Baltimore Choral Arts Society's annual art exhibit and sale, this year called "Art 93."Started in 1990, this annual event at the conference center at Sheppard Pratt has proven a major fund-raiser for Choral Arts, bringing in, all told, around a fifth of the society's contributed income of about $100,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2013
Sunday's musical splendors, for me, started with the Baltimore Choral Arts Society's season finale in the afternoon at Grace United Methodist Church. The cleverly constructed program gave audiences a chance to compare different settings of the same texts. Tom Hall, longtime artistic director of the chorus, chose a good number of pieces with spiritual texts, mixing in a little Shakespeare along the way. The composers represented were decidedly tonal in orientation, and several shared a rather generic style (I would have loved at least one walk on the wild side)
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By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 11, 1997
To open its 32nd season Sunday, Choral Arts Society invited a whole lot of people on an exploration of contemporary sacred music.In every sense, the concert was an overflow of riches -- starting with the audience, which packed the 1,000-seat Kraushaar Auditorium at Goucher College. The college's main parking lot filled up before 6: 45 p.m., and the overworked box office had such a crush to contend with that the concert started 15 minutes late.In addition to the full choir of 95 voices, a 28-piece orchestra and organist Randall Mullin, all under the baton of Tom Hall, the roll call was as follows:For the Baltimore premiere of three church anthems by Robert Sirota, director of the Peabody Conservatory of Music: a soprano from the choir (Wendy Scheinberg)
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,Special to The Sun | May 9, 1995
The Baltimore Choral Arts Society, under the inspired baton of music director Tom Hall, gave a monumental realization of the Bach B Minor Mass on Sunday afternoon in Kraushaar Auditorium. It has been 10 years since the society last performed this work. The wait was rewarded with a moving account of this Baroque masterpiece.The soloists and orchestra were superb, but the chorus was the center of attention. They did not fail conductor Hall, or Bach, for the two-hour-plus duration of this taxing score.
FEATURES
By Ernest F.Imhoff and Ernest F.Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | October 29, 1990
ALTO ANN BERGER gets paid to sing in a local church and in the Baltimore Opera chorus but sings for free in the Baltimore Choral Arts Society. "It's out of pure love" for the singing and the society, she says.Yesterday, along with William Anderson, Beverly Diaz, Jane Dummer and Elizabeth Elliott -- the five remaining veterans of the society's entire quarter century -- Berger and her 79 other colleagues renewed that love in the 25th seaon's opening concert in the packed Kraushaar Auditorium at Goucher College.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2012
Anne B. Leavitt, a retired registered nurse and an alto singer who was a longtime member of the Emmanuel Episcopal Church Choir and Baltimore Choral Arts Society, died June 21 of a stroke at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 79. The daughter of a dentist and a registered nurse, Anne Lovelace Gorsuch Benson was born in Baltimore and raised in St. Margarets and in a home next door to the old Marconi's restaurant on West Saratoga Street. Mrs. Leavitt was a 1950 graduate of Eastern High School and earned her nursing degree at the old Hospital for the Women of Maryland in Bolton Hill.
HEALTH
Susan Reimer | April 20, 2011
Writer Dudley Clendinen is a gifted raconteur, weaving his stories in a soft Southern accent and with a courtly manner. It is easy to imagine him captivating dinner guests until long after the candles have burned down. It is a savage irony, then, that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is taking his voice first when it might have chosen his limbs instead. It was slurred speech that gave Clendinen, 66, the first hint of trouble. A former national reporter and editorial writer for The New York Times who also worked for The Baltimore Sun, he had settled here to write books and teach.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | October 28, 2010
Russian composer Sergei Rachmaninoff is best known for two wildly popular piano concertos, his sumptuous Second Symphony and some brilliant solo keyboard music. But if he had written nothing but the "All-Night Vigil," an unaccompanied choral work from 1915 also known as the "Vespers," Rachmaninoff would still rank among the greats. This subtly powerful setting of texts from the Russian Orthodox liturgy will be performed by the Baltimore Choral Arts Society in an unusual presentation incorporating readings from by Shakespeare, Chekhov and others.
NEWS
By Sloane Brown and Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2010
This year's fundraiser for the Baltimore Choral Arts Society had an added kick. During the cocktail hour at the Grand Lodge in Hunt Valley, the air was abuzz with excitement over Mark Nadler , this year's featured performer at "A Ruby Cabaret." Nadler is known for his own personal brand of zippiness. "Mark is one of the nicest guys in the business. He's also very funny. He's one of the great personalities in the music business," said Tom Hall , BCA music director, as he and BCA executive director Linda Moxley greeted guests.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen , fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 12, 2009
John W. Rach, a retired CSX executive and church organist who was also a longtime Baltimore Choral Arts Society volunteer, died Wednesday of prostate cancer at the Oak Crest Village retirement community. He was 87. Mr. Rach, the son of a Koppers Co. designer and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in the city's Lake Montebello neighborhood. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1939, he earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from the Johns Hopkins University in 1943.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | December 12, 2009
John W. Rach, a retired CSX executive and church organist who was also a longtime Baltimore Choral Arts Society volunteer, died Wednesday of prostate cancer at the Oak Crest Village retirement community. He was 87. Mr. Rach, the son of a Koppers Co. designer and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in the city's Lake Montebello neighborhood. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1939, he earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from the Johns Hopkins University in 1943.
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