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Choptank River

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NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,Eastern Shore Bureau of The Sun | July 13, 1995
The name of John Dillow, a marine biologist with the Living Classrooms Foundation, was spelled incorrectly in an article yesterday about the planting of oysters in the Choptank River.The Sun regrets the error.HORN POINT -- Growing oysters puts nicks on your hands, mud on your shirt and strain on your back.Lift a 30-pound bag of shells out of the tank. Toss it down the line. Load it into the truck, then onto the boat, then into the water. Lift. Heave. Toss. Catch. Nine hundred bags -- about 13 1/2 tons -- make a morning's work.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2014
The U.S. Coast Guard will be enforcing a security perimeter around a waterfront Cambridge hotel this week to protect a gathering of House Democrats. House Democrats are scheduled to begin a retreat at the Hyatt Regency Chesapeake Bay Golf Resort, Spa and Marina, which sits on the Choptank River, on Wednesday. The Coast Guard's 500-yard "security zone" around the hotel will begin 3 a.m. Wednesday and last through Friday. The Coast Guard did not say when on Friday the perimeter would be lifted, but a spokesman said it would be "most likely sometime in the afternoon or evening.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
The U.S. Coast Guard will be enforcing a 500-yard perimeter around a waterfront hotel in Cambridge this week to protect an event for House Republicans. House Republicans are expected to gather an annual retreat at the Hyatt Regency Chesapeake Bay Golf Resort, Spa and Marina on the Choptank River starting Wednesday. The security perimeter will begin at 3 a.m. Wednesday and remain until 1 p.m. Friday. In addition to the 500-yard perimeter in the waters around the hotel, the security zone will also affect water traffic underneath the bridge that carries Route 50 over the river, the Coast Guard said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
CAMBRIDGE — This historic Eastern Shore city offers a glorious view of the Choptank River, but its working waterfront is a forlorn place. The once-thriving tuna canneries are long gone, and a failed port now sits at the mouth of Cambridge Creek, hosting occasional concerts and weddings. Cambridge officials are pushing a plan to revitalize the waterfront by redeveloping that parcel. They hope an Annapolis developer's plan for a $50 million mixed-use development will attract retirees and young professionals, as well as upscale stores and restaurants, and boost the city's long-struggling economy.
NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1999
TILGHMAN ISLAND -- The Chesapeake Bay's oldest working skipjack is lying beneath 14 feet of water near the mouth of the Choptank River.A portion of the mast and the outline of the 113-year-old Rebecca T. Ruark are visible above the heaving waves on Harris Creek. The bow is buried in sand and muck. Loaded with nearly three tons of lead ballast that shifted to the starboard side, the ship will remain pinned to the bottom until calmer winds allow an Annapolis marine salvage company to retrieve the 52-foot sailing vessel for repairs.
NEWS
August 2, 1997
A Cambridge man drowned yesterday when his boat capsized while he was making a high speed turn in the Choptank River near Cambridge, police said.Philip L. Johnson, 38, was killed at 9: 20 a.m. when he was trying to turn his power boat near the Choptank River Bridge and the boat capsized on top of him, said Nancy Howard, a spokesman for the state Natural Resources Police.Howard said Johnson's body was sent to the state medical examiner's office for an autopsy.Pub Date: 8/02/97
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | May 24, 1991
About 40 dolphins, which apparently took an unorthodox detour on their spring journey up the Atlantic coast, were spied yesterday visiting the Choptank River near Cambridge.Armed with binoculars and cameras, a group of astonished spectators counted the dolphins as they swam past about 200 yards off the Horn Point Environmental Laboratories."It was kind of impressive. They took about an hour to pass by," said Wayne Bell, vice president for external affairs for the University of Maryland's Center for Environmental and Estuarine Studies, which operates the laboratories.
NEWS
By Robert M. Pennington of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society | August 14, 1994
100 Years Ago* The steamer "Louise" of the Tolchester Steamboat Company will give a grand family excursion next Saturday from Annapolis as far as Tilghman's Island, the Choptank River and the Patuxent River. Music will be by the famous Fifth Regiment band. -- The Sun, Sept. 6, 1894.* The fourth annual convention of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union of Anne Arundel County was held Wednesday at the Baldwin Memorial Church with a large attendance. -- The Sun, Sept. 15, 1894.* The Annapolis City Council recently purchased 1,000 feet of fire hose for the Independent Fire Company.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Laura Smitherman and Timothy B. Wheeler and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporters | January 23, 2008
Legislative leaders, embarrassed by reports of lawmakers raking in a half-million dollars in contributions during last fall's special session, said yesterday they would push to close any remaining loopholes in the law forbidding fundraising whenever the General Assembly is meeting. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller reminded senators during the morning's brief legislative meeting that they should not be depositing any campaign checks during the 90-day legislative session that began Jan. 9 - even if the funds were raised before the session started.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | August 7, 1997
Goschenhoppen Folk FestivalHistory will repeat itself tomorrow and Saturday at the Goschenhoppen Folk Festival in East Greenville, Pa. Offering an authentic and educational re-creation of life and customs of the Pennsylvania Dutch in the 18th and 19th centuries, the 31st annual festival is sponsored by the Goschenhoppen Historians.More than 1,000 participants of all ages will re-enact a myriad of activities and tasks of the Pennsylvania Dutch people. Such trade skills as pottery, organ making, chair caning, food preparation, sewing and mending, weaving tape and spinning, and cornhusk-doll making will be portrayed.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2013
A century-old skipjack oyster boat capsized during a race on the Choptank River near Cambridge on Saturday, throwing 10 people into the water and sending one of its owners to the hospital with a dislocated shoulder. The 42-foot boat, Ida May, was leading the race and closing in on the finish line when it was caught in a strong gust of wind as it was turning and was knocked over, according to Mary Sue Gladden, the wife of co-owner Gordon Gladden. "They're large and they're heavy and they have a flat bottom," Gladden said.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | June 8, 2013
Steve Otten does not think about qualifying for the Ironman World Championship in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii. Not this Sunday, when the 30-year-old financial adviser from Ellicott City participates for the second straight year in the EnduraFit Ironman 70.3 EagleMan Triathlon in Cambridge in Dorchester County. Maybe ever, Otten said with a laugh last week. "It would be neat to think that [qualifying for the world championships] would be possible, but the athletes who do this on a larger scale on the professional side are so far beyond what I think could do," Otten said.
FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | March 21, 2012
Efforts to restore native oysters in Maryland's portion of the Chesapeake Bay are about to begin in earnest, as state and federal officials air plans to conduct large-scale reef rebuilding projects in Harris Creek on the Eastern Shore. The Maryland Department of Natural Resources , along with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the US. Army Corps of Engineers , are scheduled to present their plans for oyster restoration work in Harris Creek from 1 to 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Chesapeake Bay Maritime Museum inSt.
NEWS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2011
The state medical examiner's office has determined that a 71-year old Denton man whose body was found floating in the Choptank River Sunday was the victim of a homicide. An autopsy was conducted Monday. Police said that Louis R. Nichols, of the 300 block of South Fourth St., sustained multiple injuries. But the cause of Nichols' death has not been made public because police fear that the information might compromise their investigation. Nichols' body was found not far from the former Route 404 bridge near Denton around 11 a.m. Sunday.
NEWS
By The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2011
Two women have been arrested and charged with murder after their 71-year-old housemate's body was found in the Choptank River, Maryland State Police said Tuesday. Charlene R. Weddle and Mary S. Chider have been charged with murder and assault after the body of Louis R. Nichols was found in the Choptank River. State police identified Weddle as the daughter of Nichols' deceased spouse and said all three lived together in the 300 block of S. Fourth St. in Denton. Nichols was last seen alive around 10 p.m. Saturday, when he left a friend's home in Ridgely.
TRAVEL
By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2011
When the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge visit the United States as part of their forthcoming North American tour, no doubt their host city of Los Angeles will provide plenty of pomp and circumstance. Yet Marylanders could show Will and Kate a jolly good time, too, if given the royal nod. From pub crawling and shopping on Thames Street in Fells Point, to steeplechase races in Cockeysville, not to mention locales with royal pedigree — think Annapolis and Queen Anne's County — there's plenty here to remind them of Merry Old England.
NEWS
By Heather Dewar and Heather Dewar,SUN STAFF | June 8, 1998
After 24 years of sewage spilling into a city park, streets and homes of Cambridge and the Choptank River, leaders of the local Episcopal church have filed a federal lawsuit seeking to force the city to stop the spills.Seeking "corrective action to preserve God's creation," the vestry of Christ Episcopal Church has joined forces with a local community group, accusing Cambridge officials of violating the Clean Water Act by allowing sewage spills to continue despite a 1993 pledge to solve the problem.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Eastern Shore Bureau of The Sun | March 4, 1994
CHOPTANK RIVER -- Larry Manokey leaned over the starboard side of the small fiberglass boat and grabbed at something floating in the cold water."That's how we find most of them," he said, lifting the sodden carcass to reveal the torn flesh and exposed bones of an oldsquaw duck. "Their breasts are eaten out."Killed by highly infectious avian cholera and then partially eaten by scavengers, ducks are washing ashore by the thousands around the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland and Virginia. The waterfowl die-off appears to be concentrated in the two-state area, but dead ducks have now been recovered as far south as the coast of North Carolina.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2011
Nine recreational anglers from out of state were charged with fishing for striped bass in protected waters during a weekend sting operation in the Choptank River south of Denton, just one week before the start of Maryland's spring season. Working on tips from the public, Natural Resources Police officers shot video of the alleged poachers fishing on known spawning grounds and intercepted them as they returned to shore at Ganeys Wharf. Police say one angler caught 20 striped bass.
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