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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 25, 2001
"Chopper" is a great movie, if you're an Australian. For if you live in Australia, you probably know all about Mark "Chopper" Read, a violent psychopath and insufferable braggart who loves nothing more than inflicting violence on people, then basking in the notoriety resulting therefrom. The child of a devout mother and a former soldier who enjoyed sleeping alongside a loaded gun, Read grew up wanting to become a master criminal. Instead, he turned into a caricature, a guy with a trigger temper who undoubtedly did bad things, but perhaps not as bad as his fondness for telling tall tales implies.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 28, 2013
There was no doubt about which Baltimore station was the one to turn to in the immediate wake of the CSX train derailment Tuesday afternoon in Baltimore County. For the first 10 minutes or so, WBAL-TV, the Hearst-owned NBC affiliate, was the only station with live overhead helicopter shots of the wreckage along the tracks and the fires sending plumes of smoke into the air. Normally, breaking coverage on such major stories is a dogfight between WBAL and WJZ, which also owns a helicopter.
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NEWS
December 23, 1992
Want to do the environmentally correct thing with your Christmas tree? Mulch it.Starting at 10 a.m. Monday, county residents can take trees to Homestead Gardens in Davidsonville, where a Department of Public Works tree chopper will grind it to mulch for free. Residents then can take home a bag filled with 2 cubic feet of mulch, or fill up the bed of a pickup truck if they want.County Executive Robert R. Neall hailed the mulching process as a way to save landfill space. The unused Christmas tree mulch will be donated by Homestead Gardens to the county for use on county-maintained grounds.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2012
Christopher Tkacik, lost in the dark in a state park on Catoctin Mountain, had his dog, iPhone and a slowly draining battery. He could talk to the police trying to find him, but neither they nor the GPS on his smart phone could guide him out. So the 43-year-old attorney from Mount Airy turned on the device's flashlight and held it in the air. A trooper in a Maryland State Police helicopter, using night vision equipment, saw the "faint glow" from...
NEWS
By Tom Infield and Tom Infield,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | October 30, 2003
PARADISE, Pa. -- Amish farmers here in eastern Lancaster County, Pa., are facing a crisis this harvest season, and their horses just won't cut it. So this one time, their bishops are permitting Amish farmers to use heavy machinery to bring in their corn crops. "They have been told, `You need to harvest your corn for your cows to survive, so whatever you need to do -- do it,'" said David Hoover, who was helping to direct an effort at helping the Amish that has been dubbed Harvest Aid. The big wind that cut through Lancaster County in the wake of Hurricane Isabel Sept.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | June 1, 1994
Rosty is going to fight. It may not be good government, but it is good theater.What good is a White House job if you can't take a measly chopper to a crummy round of golf?Hungary is one country where capitalism is working but the people freely voted Communist anyway.The Clinton crowd in Washington is debating whether to invade Haiti. Generals in Port-au-Prince are debating whether to invade the U.S.
SPORTS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 14, 2003
The skies opened midway through yesterday's Lions Classic championship boys soccer game between host Liberty and No. 12 Glenelg and turned an already sloppy field into a virtual quagmire. By the time sunshine returned midway through the second half, players were constantly slipping and sliding. That's the main reason Glenelg coach Peter Klisas and Liberty coach Ed DeVincent opted to skip overtime when regulation ended at 2-2. Klisas and DeVincent discussed it with officials and went straight to penalty kicks.
NEWS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,katherine.dunn@baltsun.com | August 26, 2008
Luke Chopper has been playing field hockey since he was 6 years old, and now that he's a freshman at River Hill, he would like to play for the Hawks' team. Howard County's policy, however, does not allow a boy to play on a girls field hockey team, so Chopper, who plays for a coed club team, accepted a role as Hawks manager, thinking he could practice with the team. When practice started 10 days ago, he found out that he could not scrimmage with the girls and that he could do only a few stickwork drills.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | February 17, 1993
The other day I read about a plan to help train kids' taste buds.It was one of many such theories floating around these days on how to teach kids to eat well.When this particular plan, which was the combined effort of a pediatrician and a New York ad agency, jibed with my parental experience, I thought it was on target.The first tip, for instance, of involving kids in meal preparation, made sense to me. When carrots need cutting in our kitchen, we know who we're gonna call: The Chopper. The Chopper is our 8-year-old.
SPORTS
By Jeff Seidel and Jeff Seidel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 14, 2003
The skies opened midway through yesterday's Lions Classic championship boys soccer game between host Liberty and No. 12 Glenelg and turned an already sloppy field into a virtual quagmire. By the time sunshine returned midway through the second half, players were constantly slipping and sliding. That's the main reason Glenelg coach Peter Klisas and Liberty coach Ed DeVincent opted to skip overtime when regulation ended at 2-2. Klisas and DeVincent discussed it with officials and went straight to penalty kicks.
EXPLORE
By AEGIS STAFF REPORT | August 1, 2011
A pilot was transported to Harford Memorial Hospital in Havre de Grace late Friday afternoon for observation and treatment of non-life threatening injuries after a helicopter accident in Darlington. At about 5:30 p.m., the Harford County 911 center started getting calls about a helicopter crash in the area of the 4100 block of Conowingo Road in Darlington. Police and volunteer fire and EMS personnel from the Darlington Volunteer Fire Department responded and when they arrived they found the pilot standing outside of the wreckage of a privately-owned, small helicopter.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2010
The Maryland Board of Public Works approved a $72 million contract Wednesday to purchase six new helicopters — larger and faster than those the state police now fly — to begin the replacement of the state's emergency medical fleet. The three-member board unanimously ratified the contract with Agusta Aerospace Corp. of Philadelphia, the only company among four manufacturers that submitted a final bid. The contract includes an option for the state to acquire up to six more AW139 helicopters at the same price of $11.7 million each, plus an inflation adjustment.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | February 8, 2009
When he returns from Iraq late this summer after his third tour of duty, Brian Martin will be out of the state job he loves. Until last Wednesday, Lt. Martin was the commander and senior pilot of the Natural Resources Police aviation unit. Now, the decorated pilot is a chief warrant officer flying for the Army. His last tour of duty was to help ferret out roadside bombs before they injured ground troops. For the sake of saving $130,000 next year, the O'Malley administration is grounding two helicopters and reassigning Martin, Sgt. John Buchanan and mechanic Greg Lantz.
NEWS
By Dan Morhaim | October 14, 2008
The recent, tragic medevac helicopter accident that claimed four lives has focused the attention of Marylanders on our emergency medical services system. While there may be disagreement about the decision to make that particular medevac flight, every Marylander can agree that the goal of EMS should be to provide the best and most appropriate care to every patient. To achieve that goal, we need to look at EMS as one cog within a much larger health care system. Each year in Maryland, there are about 5,000 helicopter flights, 500,000 ambulance runs and 2.3 million emergency room visits.
NEWS
By Katherine Dunn and Katherine Dunn,katherine.dunn@baltsun.com | August 26, 2008
Luke Chopper has been playing field hockey since he was 6 years old, and now that he's a freshman at River Hill, he would like to play for the Hawks' team. Howard County's policy, however, does not allow a boy to play on a girls field hockey team, so Chopper, who plays for a coed club team, accepted a role as Hawks manager, thinking he could practice with the team. When practice started 10 days ago, he found out that he could not scrimmage with the girls and that he could do only a few stickwork drills.
NEWS
August 26, 2008
There is a golden hour between life and death. If you are critically injured, you have less than 60 minutes to survive." That's R. Adams Cowley, the pioneering physician and architect of trauma medicine who founded the nation's first shock trauma center in Baltimore, explaining the defining element of trauma care. It's because of Dr. Cowley's ground-breaking work that the Maryland State Police flew their first medevac transport in 1969. In the years since, medical advances have extended the golden hour in some instances, but the helicopter unit's work has continued to be founded on the concept.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Vanessa Sibbald and Vanessa Sibbald,ZAP2IT.COM | May 13, 2004
Although most people may have first laid eyes on Eric Bana as the human star of last summer's Hulk, it was his killer role in an Australian indie that landed him the part of Hector in Troy. The former standup comic was first noticed in Chopper, in which he plays Australian killer Mark "Chopper" Read, a criminal who wrote his autobiography while serving a murder sentence in prison. Brad Pitt saw the film and told his manager he wanted to meet the actor. Turns out, Pitt's manager lived next door to Bana's agent.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 23, 1997
The hardest part, writing about a Haunted House?How do you spell a scream?There's AIYEEEEE, but that's more like what a bronco rider screeches just before being thrown off the bronco. There's ARGHHHH, but that's what Charlie Brown yells when Lucy pulls away the football. There's EEEEKKKK, which is what Little Miss Muffet exclaimed when the spider sat down beside her, so that's close.Still, it's not quite right. It doesn't quite capture the combination of surprise, fear and joy that's the benchmark of a good Halloween-style Haunted House.
NEWS
By Renee Enna and Lisa Schumacher and Renee Enna and Lisa Schumacher,Chicago Tribune | March 7, 2007
OK, so you've got a food processor, blender, hand mixer and / or stand mixer -- and knives -- in your kitchen. Why add an electric mini chopper? Sometimes all you need is a little power -- to finely chop a cup of nuts, puree a small amount of homemade mayonnaise or baby food, mix up a bit of pesto. Mini choppers are not for everyone. But if you're constantly processing just a little of this or that, these mighty mites can come in handy. Note, though, that larger foods still may have to be chopped into 1-inch pieces for best results.
NEWS
By Liz Sly and Liz Sly,Chicago Tribune | February 3, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- The U.S. military is trying to determine whether insurgents have developed new techniques for shooting down helicopters after the crash near Baghdad yesterday of a fourth U.S. helicopter in two weeks, a top general said. In a claim of responsibility posted on an Islamist Web site, an al-Qaida-linked insurgent group said it had recently acquired "new methods" for shooting down U.S. helicopters, something that could have a major impact on the U.S. military effort in Iraq if it turned out to be true.
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