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By Laura Vozzella | May 18, 2011
So you got left out of William Donald Schaefer’s will, too? What are we, chopped liver? Now that we know who did (and didn’t) get the former mayor, governor and comptroller’s money, we’re left to wonder just one thing — a thing, as it happens, that’s related to chopped liver: Who got the cat? Willie IV, an orange-and-white stray, became Schaefer’s roommate at Charlestown retirement community in March 2009. As the Roman numeral at the end of his name indicates, the cat came after Willies I, II and III. But those were dogs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Vozzella | May 18, 2011
So you got left out of William Donald Schaefer’s will, too? What are we, chopped liver? Now that we know who did (and didn’t) get the former mayor, governor and comptroller’s money, we’re left to wonder just one thing — a thing, as it happens, that’s related to chopped liver: Who got the cat? Willie IV, an orange-and-white stray, became Schaefer’s roommate at Charlestown retirement community in March 2009. As the Roman numeral at the end of his name indicates, the cat came after Willies I, II and III. But those were dogs.
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NEWS
August 3, 1995
Sylvia Weinberger, 89, who used a sprinkling of matzo meal, a pinch of salt and moxie to turn chopped liver into a commercial success, died July 23 at a hospital in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. She lived in Boca Raton, Fla.Mrs. Weinberger started making chopped liver for a luncheonette she and her husband, Irving, opened in 1944 on the Grand Concourse in the Bronx. She ended up presiding over a $2 million-a-year operation as the proprietor of Mrs. Weinberg's Chopped Liver. She once said her name had been shortened because of typographical necessity when her first labels were printed: "My whole name wouldn't fit."
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2010
When he first ran for governor, then-Mayor Martin O'Malley pledged never to meet with lobbyists who'd been convicted of felonies. O'Malley didn't name names, but everyone knew he was talking about two top Annapolis arm-twisters in then-Gov. Bob Ehrlich 's camp: Bruce Bereano and Gerard Evans . So what's with the story going around that O'Malley and Evans met recently to discuss a collective-bargaining bill? I reached Evans by phone Wednesday, and he confirmed that shortly before the end of the legislative session, he participated in a meeting about the bill on behalf of two clients, the Maryland Fraternal Order of Police and Maryland Transportation Authority Police.
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | May 19, 1998
SAD TO say, most of the great old delis that gave Baltimore so much of its character and helped to define city life, are gone. But the haunting aromas of warm rye bread, hot corned beef, sizzling pastrami, mustard and pickle barrel brine live on in memory.Nates and Leon's traced its origins to 1937, when Nathan Herr and his friend, Leon Shaivitz, neither of whom knew anything about the restaurant business, opened a deli at North and Linden avenues. But they knew this: If you build better sandwiches, they will come.
NEWS
By TROY MCCULLOUGH | December 11, 2005
The new site, This Blog Will Change Your Life (365daysofhystericalliving. blogspot.com), probably won't, but it's guaranteed to make you laugh. The site charts the progress of its anonymous author as he works his way through the pages of This Book Will Change Your Life - a zany manual filled with daily tasks guaranteed to break people out of their mundane routines. For one year, the fearless blogger has vowed to follow the book's instructions "as closely as possible without getting arrested or dying."
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | March 19, 1995
Steven Raichlen's philosophy of low-fat cooking is simple: "Make food tasty and satisfying by using flavorings instead of fat." The award-winning cookbook author first applied his theory in "High-Flavor Low-Fat Cooking" a couple of years ago; now he's expanded it to include vegetarian dishes with "High-Flavor Low-Fat Vegetarian Cooking" (Viking, $24.95). Mr. Raichlen is a cooking teacher who lives in Florida; he has ties to Baltimore through family members. Here is a sample recipe:Not Chopped LiverServes 42 eggs1 tablespoon olive oil1 small onion, finely chopped5 ounces fresh mushrooms, finely chopped (about 2 cups before chopping)
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun reporter | December 13, 2006
Jewish Cooking for All Seasons Fresh, Flavorful Kosher Recipes for Holidays and Every Day Enlitened Kosher Cooking By Nechama Cohen Feldheim Publishers / 2006 / $39.95 If Laura Frankel is a gourmet cook who also happens to keep kosher, Nechama Cohen is a kosher cook who changed her ways after a lifestyle-altering diagnosis. For Cohen, chicken soup is no longer greasy, chocolate mousse doesn't have to be full of fat and chopped liver doesn't have to be high in cholesterol. She has adapted all the traditional recipes that Frankel eschewed to the low-carb, low-fat, sugar-free diet she had to adopt when she was diagnosed with diabetes.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | November 29, 1995
"Cherry pig" was the recipe request from Lorraine Wade of nTC Catonsville. "Cherries are wrapped in dough which is put in cheesecloth and dropped in boiling water. My mother made it and called it cherry pig," she wrote.Eha Schuetz of Baltimore responded with a recipe which she calls fruit dumplings "because many different fruits may be used, which includes cherries."She says it is the same recipe but she doesn't use cheesecloth when preparing.Schuetz's fruit dumplingsMakes approximately 12FILLING:36 (approximately)
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | October 2, 1997
SEATTLE -- You could almost hear the old, whispered criticisms of Mike Mussina falling hard last night, like buzz-sawed trees in a forest, during the Orioles' 9-3 victory over the Mariners in Game 1 of their Division Series at the Kingdome.The one about Mussina being a terrific pitcher who doesn't always deliver in big games?Crash!The one about him being an All-Star not quite in the same league as Randy Johnson?Tim-ber!The one about him lacking the stomach to slam-dunk a tough-hitting team before a hostile sellout crowd?
NEWS
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun reporter | December 13, 2006
Jewish Cooking for All Seasons Fresh, Flavorful Kosher Recipes for Holidays and Every Day Enlitened Kosher Cooking By Nechama Cohen Feldheim Publishers / 2006 / $39.95 If Laura Frankel is a gourmet cook who also happens to keep kosher, Nechama Cohen is a kosher cook who changed her ways after a lifestyle-altering diagnosis. For Cohen, chicken soup is no longer greasy, chocolate mousse doesn't have to be full of fat and chopped liver doesn't have to be high in cholesterol. She has adapted all the traditional recipes that Frankel eschewed to the low-carb, low-fat, sugar-free diet she had to adopt when she was diagnosed with diabetes.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 30, 2005
A feature in which Sun writers and critics sound off about the movies. Audiences already are talking about the visual poetry of Terence Malick's The New World, about Felicity Huffman's amazing turn as a man in the last stages of a sex-change operation in Transamerica, about the ribald charm and wit of Lasse Hallstrom's Casanova, about Woody Allen's resurgence as a director of the Hitchcockian Match Point. Unfortunately, none of those audiences are in Baltimore, because none of those films has opened here yet. That's really not fair, to the filmgoers, or to the films.
NEWS
By TROY MCCULLOUGH | December 11, 2005
The new site, This Blog Will Change Your Life (365daysofhystericalliving. blogspot.com), probably won't, but it's guaranteed to make you laugh. The site charts the progress of its anonymous author as he works his way through the pages of This Book Will Change Your Life - a zany manual filled with daily tasks guaranteed to break people out of their mundane routines. For one year, the fearless blogger has vowed to follow the book's instructions "as closely as possible without getting arrested or dying."
FEATURES
By Beverly Levitt and Beverly Levitt,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 27, 2000
5761 ... just when we were getting used to writing 5760. This Friday, Rosh Hashana ushers in a new year and the 10 High Holy Days when Jews are called upon to re-examine their lives -- to wake up and not only smell the roses, but also plant them for other people to enjoy. The holiday ends Oct. 9, with Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement. As the sun goes down, Jews greet each other with wishes for a bright future, and know that it's just a matter of moments until they can break their fast and -- eat. One of the true miracles of Yom Kippur is the delicious food that magically appears on tables even though all the mamas and grandmas have been sitting in synagogue all day. But in recent years, the cooks have had a challenge because many favorite dishes -- chopped liver, blintzes and sour cream, lokshen kugel (made with gobs of cottage cheese, sour cream, butter and eggs)
NEWS
By Gilbert Sandler | May 19, 1998
SAD TO say, most of the great old delis that gave Baltimore so much of its character and helped to define city life, are gone. But the haunting aromas of warm rye bread, hot corned beef, sizzling pastrami, mustard and pickle barrel brine live on in memory.Nates and Leon's traced its origins to 1937, when Nathan Herr and his friend, Leon Shaivitz, neither of whom knew anything about the restaurant business, opened a deli at North and Linden avenues. But they knew this: If you build better sandwiches, they will come.
FEATURES
By Jennifer Mabry and Jennifer Mabry,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | December 30, 1997
Shakespeare said a rose by any other name would smell as sweet, but if the name is Bond, it's a whole different story.Just ask James Christopher Bond. The year was 1965, the latest James Bond movie was "Thunderball," and Baltimore's Frances Bond, mother of three boys, ages 9, 7 and 2, was expecting her fourth child.Bond recalls that her two eldest sons, like other boys of the time, were caught up in the aura of British Agent 007. So much so that they asked their mother if they could name the new baby after him. Confident that she would finally have a girl, Frances Bond blithely replied: "Sure, we can name him James Bond."
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | November 21, 1994
WASHINGTON -- The class was made up of some of the brightest college journalists from around the country.They were attending American University for a semester to learn all about "Washington Journalism."I was invited to speak to them.The title of my speech was: "I Have No Idea What Washington Journalism Is, But Most of It Stinks."The next day I got a call from one of the students."We each have to do a profile on one of the speakers," she said. "And I would like to interview you."No, I said.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2010
When he first ran for governor, then-Mayor Martin O'Malley pledged never to meet with lobbyists who'd been convicted of felonies. O'Malley didn't name names, but everyone knew he was talking about two top Annapolis arm-twisters in then-Gov. Bob Ehrlich 's camp: Bruce Bereano and Gerard Evans . So what's with the story going around that O'Malley and Evans met recently to discuss a collective-bargaining bill? I reached Evans by phone Wednesday, and he confirmed that shortly before the end of the legislative session, he participated in a meeting about the bill on behalf of two clients, the Maryland Fraternal Order of Police and Maryland Transportation Authority Police.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | October 2, 1997
SEATTLE -- You could almost hear the old, whispered criticisms of Mike Mussina falling hard last night, like buzz-sawed trees in a forest, during the Orioles' 9-3 victory over the Mariners in Game 1 of their Division Series at the Kingdome.The one about Mussina being a terrific pitcher who doesn't always deliver in big games?Crash!The one about him being an All-Star not quite in the same league as Randy Johnson?Tim-ber!The one about him lacking the stomach to slam-dunk a tough-hitting team before a hostile sellout crowd?
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1996
If regents who set policy for Maryland's public university system have their way, the university in Towson will lose its state. The public professional schools in downtown Baltimore will lose a preposition. And Maryland's flagship university will lose its hometown.Under a measure adopted unanimously yesterday by regents at a meeting in Cambridge, Towson State University would become Towson University.The University of Maryland College Park, the flagship campus, and the University of Maryland at Baltimore, the cluster of professional schools, would both call themselves the University of Maryland -- although, on official letterheads, their hometowns would be listed either after a comma or below the words "University of Maryland."
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