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October 23, 1990
Kevin Kenner, a 27-year-old graduate of the Peabody Institute, was denied first prize in the Chopin Piano Competition in Warsaw last weekend. But that doesn't diminish the fact that his second prize was the top honor given this year -- an achievement that puts him in distinguished company. The last American to come out on top in the Chopin trials was Garrick Ohlsson in 1970. The second prize that year went to Mitsuko Uchida, the Japanese pianist whose career has since surpassed Ohlsson's, in large part on the strength of her exquisite Mozart performances and recordings.
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NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | March 14, 2014
Youthful playing comes naturally for George Li, because the pianist is only 18 years old. This precocious talent performs for the Candlelight Concert Society on Saturday, March 22, at 8 p.m., at Howard Community College's Smith Theatre. His program covers a lot of musical territory. The classicism of the late 18th century is represented by the Haydn Sonata in B minor, Hob. XVI: 32. He moves into mid-19th-century romanticism with two works by a master of writing for the keyboard, Chopin's Nocturne in B Major and Sonata No. 2 in B-flat minor.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | November 29, 1990
The Sonata No. 3 in B Minor is the most difficult of Chopin's large-scale works to bring off. No Romantic composer felt comfortable with classical form -- Chopin's B-flat Minor Sonata is really a titanic tone poem -- and the Sonata in B Minor has brought many pianists to grief. That Leon Bates performed it so successfully last night in Murphy Auditorium at Morgan State University was a tribute to musical intelligence of a very high order.Bates made the work's problems of tempo and phrasing seem relatively simple.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
His name may not register with concert-goers as quickly as some others, but Nelson Freire is easily recognized as one of the most respected pianists on the world scene. Without a hint of showiness or artificial attitude, Freire invariably brings a sterling technique and stylistic authority to the keyboard, as he did in a recital Sunday evening for the Shriver Hall Concert Series. The pianist established at the outset, in the Siloti arrangement of Bach's G minor Organ Prelude, that the tone would be warm and richly colored all night, that the phrasing would speak eloquently.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | June 5, 1994
Chopin, Sonata No. 2 ("Funeral March") in B-flat Minor (opus 35) and Ballade No. 4 in F Minor (opus 52), and Juliusz Zarebski, "Novellette Caprice" (opus 19), "Grande Polonaise" (opus 6), "Serenade Burlesque" (opus 20), and "Suite Polonaise" (opus 16), performed by pianist Rachel Franklin (Endeca EN/RF-199401).Rachel Franklin, a young Baltimore-based British pianist, gave a lovely recital last year at the Walters Art Gallery, in which she performed some of these pieces. This record confirms the fine impression she made at that time.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 7, 1996
Richard Goode took a sabbatical last year, and the fruits of that break in his schedule should be apparent when he performs Mozart's "Piano Concerto No. 27 (K.595)" this week in Meyerhoff Hall with David Zinman and the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.Because it is Mozart's final concerto and was among the last major works he completed before his death, Goode says, it's usually interpreted as a death-haunted valediction to a genre the composer had made his own as he had no other."But it is not as tragic as some of Mozart's earlier piano concertos," Goode says in a telephone interview.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 28, 2002
In music, as in fashion and a host of other endeavors, exoticism sells. It is this capitalistic imperative, coupled with our natural feeling that the cachet-laden foreign model must somehow be superior to the domestic one, that whispers to us that pianists from, say, Vienna, Seoul or Tashkent are better than the home-grown variety. That stereotype was exposed for the nonsense it is Saturday at Maryland Hall when Brian Ganz, a concert pianist from exotic, far-off Crownsville, made his long overdue debut with the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,Evening Sun Staff | October 31, 1990
Kevin Kenner feels most at home with Chopin. It's hard to say if Chopin would feel the same about Kenner. But 700 people at the Peabody Institute's sold-out Friedberg Concert Hall last night felt at home with both gentlemen and awarded both first-place applause.The 27-year-old Kenner played Chopin's "Piano Concerto No. 1 in E Minor" with the Peabody Symphony Orchestra instead of the earlier planned Mozart Concerto No. 20. It was the same deeply Romantic piece he had played in Warsaw two weeks ago in winning top honors -- but only second prize -- in the Chopin Piano Competition.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic Kay Withers, special correspondent to The Sun, and Tom Kavanagh of the The Sun's Features staff contributed to this article | October 21, 1990
Kevin Kenner should never have to enter a piano competitio again.The 27-year-old Peabody-trained American won "only" second prize in the 12th international Frederic Chopin Piano Competition in Warsaw, Poland, early yesterday. But no first prize was awarded, and that left Mr. Kenner the top prize winner in one of the two most prestigious piano contests in the world -- Moscow's Tchaikovsky Competition, in which Mr. Kenner won third place this summer, is the other.The Chopin finish also made him the only American to have emerged at the top of the heap in Warsaw since Garrick Ohlsson's historic victory there in 1970.
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | February 9, 1997
The piano recital is reputedly near extinction, but Baltimore seems to be late in getting the news.Today Garrick Ohlsson adds to an impressive list of scheduled performances that includes last weekend's packed-to-the-rafters appearance by Horacio Gutierrez and the prestigious lineup of the Shriver Hall Concert Series, which began with a recital by Leon Fleisher and will end in April with one by Murray Perahia.Ohlsson -- a physically imposing 6-foot-4 -- has been an important presence on the world's concert stages since 1970 when he became the only American to win first prize in Warsaw's Chopin Competition, beating out a strong field that included the likes of Mitsuko Uchida and Emanuel Ax.Since Ohlsson is a serious, thoughtful artist, it comes as something of a surprise that the first half of his recital tonight consists of the seemingly unlikely combination of Beethoven's backward-looking Sonata No. 16 in G major (Opus 31, No. 1)
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2013
Delphine S. Kelly, a music teacher and former Eastern Shore social worker, died Oct. 27 of a stroke at the Chester River Hospital Center in Chestertown. She was 90. The former Delphine Stewart was born and raised in Toronto. She was the daughter of Reginald Stewart, a concert pianist, and Ruby Stewart, a homemaker. Mrs. Kelly moved with her family to Baltimore in 1941, when her father was appointed director of the Peabody Conservatory of Music and named conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, where he played an instrumental role in its reorganization in 1942 from a branch of city government to a private institution.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | October 25, 2013
When Brian Ganz performs a solo recital for the Sundays at Three series on Sunday, Oct. 27, he won't have any trouble finding Christ Episcopal Church in Columbia. The classical pianist knows the local roads like he knows his way around a keyboard. Ganz, 53, qualifies as a hometown favorite. He grew up in Columbia and likes to return for concerts. He has played for the Sundays at Three series before, and he also has appeared with the Columbia Orchestra. Born in Takoma Park, Ganz moved to Columbia when he was 9 years old. Although he attended Wilde Lake High School, Ganz arguably qualifies as its most celebrated dropout.
NEWS
January 4, 2013
Sunday, Jan. 6 Recital Pianist Brian Ganz performs a mini-recital of his all-Chopin concert at 7:30 p.m. at the Unitarian Universalist Church of Annapolis, 333 Dubois Road. Recital is a preview of his upcoming concert at the Strathmore Music Center on Jan. 19. Cynthia Word, artistic director of the Word Dance Theater in Washington, will perform during several Chopin preludes. Event is free but donations to the church are requested. Information: 301-904-3690 or marca1030@gmail.com . Monday, Jan. 7 Photo club The Digital Photography Club of Annapolis meets at 7 p.m. at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, 801 Chase St. in Annapolis.
EXPLORE
November 1, 2011
Concerts Pianist Brian Ganz will return to his hometown of Columbia to once again perform at the Sundays at Three chamber music concert series this Sunday, Nov. 6, p.m., at Christ Episcopal Church, located at 6800 Oakland Mills Road. Ganz is now based in Annapolis and regularly performs all over the world and earlier this year performed works by Chopin in that composer's homeland, Poland. He is a graduate of the Peabody Conservatory, where he studied under Leon Fleisher.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2011
The boy was 11, already well along in his process of discovering music, when he found himself alone at home one day, listening to a piece by one of history's great romantics. He couldn't explain it, but something in the sounds of Frederic Chopin's Ballade No. 1 in G Minor, Opus 23 — as played by Polish musician Witold Malcuzynsky — struck Brian Ganz like a bolt from stormy skies. "It was mysterious, sort of soulful, and I actually, literally, doubled over in pain," says Ganz, an internationally celebrated concert pianist who lives in Annapolis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 9, 2010
Brian Ganz is preparing to climb a musical Mt. Everest. He wants to perform all 250 keyboard-based works of Frederic Chopin. He's in no hurry, though. "This will probably take the better part of a decade," he said. Ganz will give a preview of the venture Saturday in Annapolis. The Chopin project will then be launched with a recital next month at the Music Center at Strathmore in North Bethesda, where Ganz will eventually perform Chopin's piano/orchestra works with the National Philharmonic.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2001
Two weeks after being the host for Elmar Oliveira, a violinist's violinist, Candlelight Concerts of Columbia is poised to present a pianist's pianist Sunday. Richard Goode is not known for his fire-breathing renditions of warhorses such as the Tchaikovsky 1st and Rachmaninoff 3rd piano concertos. He plays Chopin beautifully, but in a scrupulously crafted manner that's short on flash and dash, and I'm not sure he's ever closed a recital with a razzle-dazzle transcription of "Carmen" or Sousa's "Stars and Stripes Forever."
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 9, 1997
Chopin, the Nocturnes, performed by pianist Maria Joao Pires (Deutsche Grammophon 447096):Those who buy Maria Joao Pires' extravagantly praised new set of Chopin's 21 Nocturnes may be disappointed. Pires performs the nocturnes gracefully, particularly those that come closest to the salon miniatures of the Irish composer, John Field, whose nocturnes Chopin admired. But even at her best, she does not achieve the pliant relationship between melody and accompaniment that marks the best Chopin playing.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | June 4, 2009
The driest May in Minnesota since the Dust Bowl. Venerable GM slides into bankruptcy and you shudder for the old Pontiac dealers and the retirees in Michigan. In the middle of the night, an Airbus drops out of the air into the Atlantic Ocean, and the veteran traveler shudders to think of it. And the posthumous John Updike appears in the bookstore, a book of short stories and his last poems, written by "my right hand ... faithful old five-fingered beast of burden ... its labors meant to carve from language beauty, that beauty which lifts free of flesh to find itself in print."
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