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Cholesterol Lowering

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By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | July 24, 2005
My cholesterol has always been around 200, but I have a bad family history and a past angioplasty. In addition to a good diet and regular exercise, my doctor has prescribed various statin drugs to lower my cholesterol. Three different ones have given me peripheral neuropathy (pins and needles). My doctor next prescribed Crestor, which he takes himself. I started on Friday, and on Sunday I woke with what has been diagnosed as transient global amnesia. I played golf that morning and played well, but I kept asking the same questions over and over.
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NEWS
By Joe and Teresa Graedon and Joe and Teresa Graedon,PeoplesPharmacy.com | September 22, 2008
I have normal LDL cholesterol but low HDL, as low as 26. With diet and exercise, I can get my HDL to the mid-30s, which is not great. Lipitor lowered my LDL below 80, but sadly my HDL didn't budge. After being on Lipitor for a couple of months, I woke up one morning and had no idea what day of the week it was or that the company picnic was the day before. At work, I could not make simple postings of dollar amounts from hard copy to electronic spreadsheet (I would forget the amounts). At a meeting, I could not remember names, and later at home, I kept asking my wife the same question, as I could not remember her answer.
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FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,Contributing Writers/King Features Syndicate | August 31, 1993
When it comes to cholesterol you can't win. Doctors disagree, often vehemently, about whom to treat and how to do it.We thought the controversy was primarily between British cardiologists and their U.S. counterparts.This was clear in the case of Margaret, who spends half the year in the United States and half in London. Her American doctor wants her on the cholesterol-lowering drug Pravachol because her total cholesterol is 234 and he wants it below 200. But her British physician thinks that strategy is typical American overkill.
NEWS
By JANET HELM and JANET HELM,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 9, 2006
If you have high blood cholesterol - like an estimated 100 million Americans - then chances are you're trying to change the way you eat. Your blood cholesterol level has a lot to do with your risk of getting heart disease, which is the country's No. 1 killer. Diet often is the first defense before a doctor turns to drugs to lower cholesterol levels. Losing weight, exercising and cutting down on "bad" fats are the cornerstones of a cholesterol-lowering lifestyle. WHAT TO EAT The four types of food that help lower "bad" cholesterol.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | March 6, 2005
I took Lipitor for about eight months. One morning, I awoke to pain in my neck, upper back, shoulders and arms. In addition, my arms are much weaker than before. The pain has been diagnosed as peripheral neuropathy. The only time I feel good is when I lie in a tub of hot water. Most of my life, I had a great memory, but I've become very forgetful. I start a sentence and then forget what I want to say. I also feel depressed, just the opposite of my usual demeanor. I cannot tolerate these side effects and would like some other way to lower my cholesterol.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Special to The Sun | November 22, 1994
Q: I am 72 years old and have been treated with a medication to lower my cholesterol for the past five years. My wife is concerned because she saw a recent newspaper article stating that a high cholesterol level does not increase the risk of having a heart attack in people over the age of 70. Would you advise that I stop taking my medication?A: Your specific question can not be answered without more information, such as the level of your cholesterol, the effectiveness of the medication in lowering your cholesterol, whether you had a previous heart attack or other evidence of coronary artery disease (CAD)
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | August 28, 2005
A year or so ago, you had a letter from a reader who said a pill she was taking turned her gray hair dark again. I know it's not guaranteed to work, but I'd like to try it. Do you know what she was taking? She was taking two cholesterol-lowering drugs, Zocor and Zetia. Her report was strange because her original hair color was blond, but her gray hair started growing in black while on these drugs. We invited other readers to tell us if they had similar hair-color changes, and many did. Most were on Zocor or Zetia or the combination (Vytorin)
NEWS
By JANET HELM and JANET HELM,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 9, 2006
If you have high blood cholesterol - like an estimated 100 million Americans - then chances are you're trying to change the way you eat. Your blood cholesterol level has a lot to do with your risk of getting heart disease, which is the country's No. 1 killer. Diet often is the first defense before a doctor turns to drugs to lower cholesterol levels. Losing weight, exercising and cutting down on "bad" fats are the cornerstones of a cholesterol-lowering lifestyle. WHAT TO EAT The four types of food that help lower "bad" cholesterol.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 17, 1996
When I was a teen-ager my doctor prescribed Quadrinal for asthma. It contained ephedrine and other ingredients. I don't like taking drugs, so now when I have an occasional problem with asthma as an adult I rely on an ephedra-containing tea from the health food store. It works just like my old prescription.I have been reading that the FDA is cracking down on ephedrine because people have had heart attacks and seizures. I worry that the FDA might ban it, and that would be a shame. This herb has been used for centuries, hasn't it?
NEWS
By SAN ANTONIO EXPRESS-NEWS | May 27, 1998
SAN ANTONIO -- Six million healthy Americans not previously considered candidates for cholesterol-lowering treatment could slash their risk of heart problems by a third with drug therapy, researchers say.But with the cost of treatment as high as $100 per month, the question of who should be treated is likely to be decided by individual doctors and their patients based on additional risk factors, at least until more information is available, experts said."This...
NEWS
By JOE GRAEDON AND TERESA GRAEDON | June 9, 2006
I am addicted to radishes. My mom doesn't want me to eat them, but I can't go without having at least 10 a day. My mom stopped buying them so I would stop eating them. Before this, I just liked them, but now I feel like I am already addicted. What can I do? Ask your mom to take you to the doctor for a blood test. Cravings like yours can be a consequence of an iron or zinc deficiency, and the doctor can check whether you are deficient in these nutrients. We have heard from other people who craved carrots, tomatoes, popcorn or orange peels to an unusual extent, just as you do with radishes.
NEWS
By RONALD KOTULAK | December 25, 2005
CHICAGO -- Not since aspirin has a class of drugs come along that does so much more than originally intended that it could end up being used as a preventive against many major diseases. Statins, which lower cholesterol, have been proved in clinical trials to reduce heart attacks and strokes by 30 percent to 50 percent. They are the most widely prescribed drugs in the United States; one in 10 adults takes them. But their full value in improving the nation's health rests with research attempting to establish the ability of statins to prevent cancer, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, osteoporosis, high blood pressure, multiple sclerosis and macular degeneration.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 8, 2005
LOS ANGELES -- Lovastatin, a widely used cholesterol-lowering drug, reverses common learning disabilities in mice, offering the first hope for a treatment of the problem in humans, University of California, Los Angeles researchers reported yesterday. Three human trials in children and adults will begin at UCLA and other U.S. and European locations within weeks, said Dr. Alcino J. Silva, a neurobiologist at UCLA and the lead author of a paper appearing in the journal Current Biology. Lovastatin, trade-named Mevacor, is one of a family of drugs known collectively as statins that have revolutionized the treatment of high cholesterol.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | August 28, 2005
A year or so ago, you had a letter from a reader who said a pill she was taking turned her gray hair dark again. I know it's not guaranteed to work, but I'd like to try it. Do you know what she was taking? She was taking two cholesterol-lowering drugs, Zocor and Zetia. Her report was strange because her original hair color was blond, but her gray hair started growing in black while on these drugs. We invited other readers to tell us if they had similar hair-color changes, and many did. Most were on Zocor or Zetia or the combination (Vytorin)
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | July 24, 2005
My cholesterol has always been around 200, but I have a bad family history and a past angioplasty. In addition to a good diet and regular exercise, my doctor has prescribed various statin drugs to lower my cholesterol. Three different ones have given me peripheral neuropathy (pins and needles). My doctor next prescribed Crestor, which he takes himself. I started on Friday, and on Sunday I woke with what has been diagnosed as transient global amnesia. I played golf that morning and played well, but I kept asking the same questions over and over.
NEWS
By Delthia Ricks and Delthia Ricks,NEWSDAY | May 24, 2005
NEW YORK - Despite government assurances that the popular cholesterol-lowering drug Crestor is safe, a new report has raised questions about the medication, saying it produces double the adverse reactions of others in its class. A new Crestor investigation, which analyzes adverse events reported to the Food and Drug Administration, said the statin should be used only in instances when other statins fail to appropriately lower LDL, the bad form of cholesterol. Adverse events are reported to the FDA by health care providers and patient advocates, and the information is maintained in a database.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | November 8, 1990
BOSTON -- A new study showing that aggressive use of cholesterol-lowering drugs can reverse serious heart disease could have an immediate impact on the treatment of millions of patients with severe chest pains and other symptoms, doctors say.The study, published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, showed that combinations of lovastatin and colestipol, or niacin and colestipol, reopened clogged coronary arteries and dramatically cut the risk of...
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | October 20, 1992
In a departure from a decade of medical gospel, a new review of data from around the world questions assumptions about the value of reducing cholesterol, particularly for women. It has left experts on scientific quicksand.The review -- the largest ever conducted -- has led some prominent researchers to call for a scaling back of widespread cholesterol-reduction programs. A few even suggest eliminating routine screening and treatment for many people now told to go on low-fat diets or take cholesterol-lowering drugs.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | March 6, 2005
I took Lipitor for about eight months. One morning, I awoke to pain in my neck, upper back, shoulders and arms. In addition, my arms are much weaker than before. The pain has been diagnosed as peripheral neuropathy. The only time I feel good is when I lie in a tub of hot water. Most of my life, I had a great memory, but I've become very forgetful. I start a sentence and then forget what I want to say. I also feel depressed, just the opposite of my usual demeanor. I cannot tolerate these side effects and would like some other way to lower my cholesterol.
NEWS
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,King Features Syndicate | November 2, 2003
My cholesterol has ranged from 240 to 300 for years. My doctor finds these numbers unacceptable and has insisted I take medication. First I was put on Lescol. My muscles hurt so much I could barely walk. Then I was put on Zocor. The muscle pain came back. The same pattern repeated with Lipitor. Is there any way to get my cholesterol down without one of these drugs? A multifaceted approach to lowering cholesterol naturally can be successful. A recent study reported in the Journal of the American Medical Association showed that consuming a "dietary portfolio" of vegetarian foods lowered cholesterol nearly as well as the prescription drug lovastatin (Mevacor)
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