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Cholera

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NEWS
March 6, 1994
The plague of avian cholera that has swept down the Chesapeake Bay this winter reminds us of the perplexing factors that nature periodically employs to regulate the ecosystem.Scientists admit to helplessness in the wake of the rapid contagion that has killed thousands of ducks from Queen Anne's County through Virginia's portion of the bay. Department of Natural Resources workers can do no more than promptly retrieve the carcasses to keep the disease from spreading into the streams, rivers and ponds that could infect other birds, from sparrows to swans.
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HEALTH
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2012
Cholera broke out in Haiti two years ago, and more than 7,000 people have died. Some researchers traced the outbreak's origin to United Nations peacekeepers sent from Nepal after the devastating earthquake in 2010. The theory that Nepalese soldiers unwittingly spread the bacterial gastrointestinal ailment has become widely accepted based on genetic fingerprints revealing the strain's Asian roots. Now research from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and College Park campuses is painting a more complicated picture, with recent findings showing that a second cholera strain also sickened some Haitians.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 21, 1994
Cholera is a severe form of bacterial dysentery that can thrive under conditions of squalor and poor sanitation.In its most severe form, cholera causes profuse watery diarrhea and vomiting. In turn, these symptoms can lead to dehydration, collapse of the circulatory system and death within a few hours of onset.Death rates of 50 percent have been recorded in epidemics.But if fluid loss is promptly corrected intravenously or by drinking oral rehydration solutions, the death rate falls to less than 1 percent.
NEWS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | November 10, 2008
Headphones interfere with heart devices NEW ORLEANS: A new study indicates that headphones can interfere with heart devices such as a pacemaker or an implanted defibrillator. "Headphones contain magnets, and some of these magnets are powerful," said the study's leader, Dr. William Maisel, a cardiologist at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston and a consultant to the Food and Drug Administration. "The headphone interaction applies whether or not the headphones are plugged in to the music player and whether or not the music player is on or off."
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Zeena Kareem and Tina Susman and Zeena Kareem,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 13, 2007
baghdad -- Five cases of cholera have been reported among children in Iraq in the past three weeks, a worrying sign as temperatures rise and the war leaves sewage and sanitation systems a shambles. All of the cases were among children younger than 12 in the southern city of Najaf, and all were reported by medical officials on alert for signs of the potentially lethal ailment, Claire Hajaj of UNICEF said yesterday. Cholera, which is spread through bacteria in contaminated water, is easily treatable but can cause rapid dehydration and death if not treated.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | May 23, 1995
MEXICO CITY -- Cholera, the deadly intestinal disease that swept through Latin America killing thousands four years ago, has cropped up with new force in at least five Mexican states, leaving officials worried about a serious outbreak.The number of cases is still low compared with the Peruvian epidemic in 1991 and 1992, when more than 500,000 people contracted the disease.But Mexican health officials reported 507 cases during one week this month and 1,737 cases for the first five months of the year, triple the number of cases during the same period last year.
FEATURES
By Sam Dillon and Sam Dillon,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 30, 1991
LA PAZ, Bolivia -- Cholera has taken root in South America because governments have for decades failed to modernize the region's medieval water and sewage systems, health officials say. Now, there are no cheap solutions and the epidemic is forcing Latin American leaders to make excruciating choices.Colombian Health Minister Camilo Gonzalez proposed during an anti-cholera summit in Sucre, Bolivia, that regional governments battle the contagion, which breeds in dirty water and sewage, with an emergency campaign to provide running water and basic sanitation to all Latin Americans -- in two years.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 16, 2007
The movie version of Love in the Time of Cholera doesn't have the drive or the dynamism to be an artistic nightmare. It's more like a dead dream, the kind that leaves nothing more behind in the light of day than a sickly cloud. The director, Mike Newell, and the screenwriter, Ronald Harwood, have taken novelist Gabriel Garcia Marquez's sustained flight of grand passion and analyzed the swooping life right out of it. They've thought their way into an adaptation that needed to be intuitive and "felt," like Marquez's mighty marvel of a book.
NEWS
By The Kansas City Star | May 3, 1993
Westmoreland, Kan. -- The message is brief, revealing perhaps more about the living than the dead."Here lies an early traveler who lost his life in quest of riches in the west."No name. No date on this grave marker near Vermillion Creek just south of Westmoreland.A good guess, however, would be that the traveler died in 1849. And that would lead to a reasonably accurate surmise that cholera was the killer.The reference to "riches" sounds a little disapproving, maybe even smug. The quest might have been for California gold or it could mean the bounty of Oregon.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 27, 1991
LA PAZ, Bolivia -- Cholera has taken root in South America because governments have failed for decades to modernize the region's decrepit water and sewage systems, health officials say. Now, there are no cheap solutions, and the epidemic is forcing Latin American leaders to make excruciating choices.Colombian Health Minister Camilo Gonzalez proposed during an anti-cholera summit in Sucre, Bolivia, that regional governments battle the contagion, which breeds in dirty water and sewage, with an emergency campaign to provide running water and basic sanitation to all Latin Americans -- in two years.
FEATURES
By Agustin Gurza and Agustin Gurza,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 22, 2007
Shakira was sick of being a celebrity. Colombia's sensationally successful singer-songwriter had just come off her Oral Fixation tour this year, taking her to 140 cities on five continents to perform for 2.5 million fans. But even stardom can be a drag. So she put away her revealing sequined gowns and hip-hugging pants, donned jeans and sneakers, tucked her famous shock of dyed hair under a cap and went undercover as a summer student at University of California, Los Angeles. She enrolled in a history of Western civilization course under her middle and last names, Isabel Mebarak, telling clueless classmates she was visiting from Colombia.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 16, 2007
The movie version of Love in the Time of Cholera doesn't have the drive or the dynamism to be an artistic nightmare. It's more like a dead dream, the kind that leaves nothing more behind in the light of day than a sickly cloud. The director, Mike Newell, and the screenwriter, Ronald Harwood, have taken novelist Gabriel Garcia Marquez's sustained flight of grand passion and analyzed the swooping life right out of it. They've thought their way into an adaptation that needed to be intuitive and "felt," like Marquez's mighty marvel of a book.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2007
BEOWULF -- Angelina Jolie, Anthony Hopkins and Ray Winstone star in the Norse legend of the warrior who battles Grendel and his mother. NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN -- A hunter stumbles upon dead bodies, a stash of heroin and more than $2 million in cash. MR. MAGORIUM'S WONDER EMPORIUM -- Dustin Hoffman plays the mysterious proprietor of a magic toy shop. JIMMY CARTER MAN FROM PLAINS -- The story of the former president's book tour to promote Palestine: Peace or Apartheid. LOVE IN THE TIME OF CHOLERA -- Lovers wait a half-century to reunite in the adaptation of Gabriel Garcia Marquez's novel of the same name.
NEWS
November 11, 2007
The Ghost Map By Steven Johnson In the face of a horrifying epidemic, London physician John Snow posited the then-radical theory that cholera was spread through contaminated water rather than through miasma, or smells in the air. Against considerable resistance from the medical and bureaucratic establishments, Snow persisted and, with hard work and groundbreaking research, helped to bring about a fundamental change in our understanding of disease and...
FEATURES
November 9, 2007
Next Friday BEOWULF -- (Paramount) Angelina Jolie, Anthony Hopkins and Ray Winstone star in the Norse legend of the warrior who battles Grendel and his mother. Robert Zemeckis directs. DARFUR NOW -- (Warner Independent) Actor Don Cheadle leads an examination of the genocide in Sudan's western region. JIMMY CARTER MAN FROM PLAINS -- (Sony Classics) Director Jonathan Demme chronicles the former president's travels as Carter promotes his book Palestine: Peace Not Apartheid. LOVE IN THE TIME OF CHOLERA -- (New Line Cinema)
NEWS
By Tina Susman and Zeena Kareem and Tina Susman and Zeena Kareem,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 13, 2007
baghdad -- Five cases of cholera have been reported among children in Iraq in the past three weeks, a worrying sign as temperatures rise and the war leaves sewage and sanitation systems a shambles. All of the cases were among children younger than 12 in the southern city of Najaf, and all were reported by medical officials on alert for signs of the potentially lethal ailment, Claire Hajaj of UNICEF said yesterday. Cholera, which is spread through bacteria in contaminated water, is easily treatable but can cause rapid dehydration and death if not treated.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Sun Staff Writer | March 3, 1994
By early this week, wildlife division personnel in Maryland and Virginia had collected more than 4,000 carcasses of waterfowl dead from the recent outbreak of avian cholera.Dead waterfowl, mainly sea ducks, have been collected from shorelines at Sandy Point and Kent Island as far south as Virginia Beach. The greatest concentrations in Maryland have been in Calvert and St. Mary's counties on the western shore of the Chesapeake Bay and at Tilghman Island and the south shore of the Choptank River in Talbot and Dorchester counties on the Eastern Shore.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 21, 1992
LOS ANGELES -- The number of passengers from an Aerolineas Argentinas flight from South America showing symptoms of cholera grew to 23 yesterday, ands health officials worked furiously to locate other passengers to limit the repercussions of the disease.Nearly half of the 52 passengers contacted thus far in Los Angeles County have shown symptoms of the disease in the current outbreak, which is known to have killed one and infected five others, local health officials said.There were 336 people aboard last Friday's Flight 386 from Buenos Aires and Lima, Peru, to Los Angeles.
NEWS
By Mark Coleman and Mark Coleman,Los Angeles Times | October 22, 2006
The Ghost Map: The Story of London's Most Terrifying Epidemic - and How It Changed Science, Cities, and the Modern World Steven Johnson Riverhead Books / 302 pages / $26.95 If every great city resembles a living organism, then mid-19th century London was an ungainly and careless youthful giant with appalling personal habits. As Steven Johnson makes nauseatingly clear in the grim and gripping early pages of The Ghost Map, the stench of human excrement was everywhere. Forget about sanitary engineering and the modern science of waste management.
NEWS
By Kathy Bergen Smith and Kathy Bergen Smith,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 26, 2003
Tim Mullady peers into a microscope in a darkened room at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater. He is counting cells from a sample of ballast water taken from a ship, looking for vibrio cholerae, the bacterium that causes human cholera - and sometimes is discharged from that ballast into local waters along with scores of other "foreign" organisms. Mullady is part of the National Marine Invasion Research Program, which provides the Coast Guard and Congress with information from the forefront of the research community on this issue.
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