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By EATING WELL MAGAZINE United Feature Syndicate | September 24, 1995
There is always a half-gallon of nonfat or low-fat vanilla frozen yogurt in the test-kitchen freezer here at Eating Well magazine. While it is rather plain on its own, we love to drizzle it with toppings for jazzy but ultra-fast desserts. Here are two ideas for sauces that take only minutes to make.MA The first one is a saucy version of the Louisiana confection.Praline sauceMakes 1 cup2 teaspoons butter1/4 cup chopped pecans (1 ounce)1 cup packed dark brown sugar1/3 cup low-fat milk1 tablespoon cornstarchpinch of saltIn a small saucepan, melt butter over medium heat.
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NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | July 11, 2007
Maggie Moo's Ice Cream Treatery Circle Drive-In Ice Cream Co. 555 Dundalk Ave., Baltimore -- 410-633-1899 Hours --11 a.m.-10 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays; 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Fridays; noon-11 p.m. Saturdays; noon-10 p.m. Sundays In and out in --6 minutes This banana split, $5.20, had soft ice cream instead of hand-scooped, which meant it quickly melted into a sweet soup. It was topped with wet nuts, strawberry and chocolate syrup and a cherry. It also had a pineapple syrup, which didn't go well with the other flavors.
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NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun reporter | July 11, 2007
Maggie Moo's Ice Cream Treatery Circle Drive-In Ice Cream Co. 555 Dundalk Ave., Baltimore -- 410-633-1899 Hours --11 a.m.-10 p.m. Mondays-Thursdays; 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Fridays; noon-11 p.m. Saturdays; noon-10 p.m. Sundays In and out in --6 minutes This banana split, $5.20, had soft ice cream instead of hand-scooped, which meant it quickly melted into a sweet soup. It was topped with wet nuts, strawberry and chocolate syrup and a cherry. It also had a pineapple syrup, which didn't go well with the other flavors.
NEWS
By SUN STAFF | January 26, 2005
With the arrival of this season's first real snow, it's time to bring out the recipe for that old-time favorite, Snow Ice Cream. Of course, you'll want to use fresh snow, if possible, and some recipes say don't use first-day snow because it contains pollutants from the air. Here's an easy recipe: Snow Ice Cream Serves 8 1 cup heavy cream 1/2 cup confectioners' sugar or 1/4 cup granulated sugar 1 tablespoon vanilla 8 cups of clean, fresh snow ...
NEWS
By SUN STAFF | January 26, 2005
With the arrival of this season's first real snow, it's time to bring out the recipe for that old-time favorite, Snow Ice Cream. Of course, you'll want to use fresh snow, if possible, and some recipes say don't use first-day snow because it contains pollutants from the air. Here's an easy recipe: Snow Ice Cream Serves 8 1 cup heavy cream 1/2 cup confectioners' sugar or 1/4 cup granulated sugar 1 tablespoon vanilla 8 cups of clean, fresh snow ...
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 5, 2003
Whatever your age, a mug of warm milk and a cozy place to sip it is one of the great pleasures of winter. Even better, hot milk is one of those drinks versatile enough to keep offering enticing variations. You can warm milk gently on the stove top, although these days it's often easier to stick it in the microwave for a minute or so. But if you really want to treat yourself, try frothing your milk. A number of cooking stores carry milk frothers. There are automatic machines that do the work for you, as well as the manual versions that help you turn warm milk into a bubbly treat.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | December 28, 1994
A marble cake made with Hershey syrup plus a crab and artichoke dish will be a treat, this year or next.Bart Kennedy of Baltimore requested a hot crab and artichoke dipnoting that he had been unsuccessful in locating this recipe. "I would appreciate an answer," he wrote.Rochelle Eisenberg, senior account executive with the Old Bay Co. in Baltimore, responded. She sent a recipe that was submitted in a contest Old Bay held in Florida. "It is delicious," Chef Gilles Sygloski says.Hot Artichoke and Crab DipMakes 2 cups1/2 cup mayonnaise1/2 cup sour cream7 ounce can artichoke hearts, chopped and drained.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1999
Lillian Malas, a teen-age shepherd in her native Greece who became a Baltimore restaurateur -- as famous for her crab cakes as she was for her religious work ethic -- died Saturday at her Reisterstown home. She was 95 and died of natural causes.Mrs. Malas stopped her work in the kitchen of Duffy's, her family's Southwest Baltimore restaurant that closed this year, when she was incapacitated by a stroke, said her daughter Mary Aiello. She had been retired for a year."She seemed to thrive on working.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | January 27, 1993
When Esther M. Guffy of Ellicott City wrote asking for a chocolate cake recipe, she all but apologized for wanting it. "I know I shouldn't eat this cake, which is like candy fudge and is called a 'decadent chocolate cake.' A bunch of us had some while in Virginia Beach last September," she wrote.Ms. Guffy must first know there is a whole world out there of cake lovers who do not feel at all guilty about eating the decadent chocolate cake for which they sent recipes. Most were similar.Chef Syglowski of the Baltimore International Culinary College, who tests the recipes sent in, chose one from Louanna "Lu" L. White of Severna Park and another from Mary Lou Schmidt of Baltimore who called her cake the "seduction cake."
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | August 31, 2002
I OFTEN HEAR people chatting about how they search out the best martini, Manhattan or cosmopolitan, an incredible crab cake or even slaw or french fries. I confess to being a chocolate soda devotee, which I think is even more rare than decent Baltimore peach cake. By chocolate soda I mean the confection served in a classic, tapered soda fountain glass (real glass a must), with a long spoon. Inside is a rhapsody of fountain soda water, a little half-and-half, chocolate syrup and vanilla ice cream.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 5, 2003
Whatever your age, a mug of warm milk and a cozy place to sip it is one of the great pleasures of winter. Even better, hot milk is one of those drinks versatile enough to keep offering enticing variations. You can warm milk gently on the stove top, although these days it's often easier to stick it in the microwave for a minute or so. But if you really want to treat yourself, try frothing your milk. A number of cooking stores carry milk frothers. There are automatic machines that do the work for you, as well as the manual versions that help you turn warm milk into a bubbly treat.
FEATURES
By JACQUES KELLY | August 31, 2002
I OFTEN HEAR people chatting about how they search out the best martini, Manhattan or cosmopolitan, an incredible crab cake or even slaw or french fries. I confess to being a chocolate soda devotee, which I think is even more rare than decent Baltimore peach cake. By chocolate soda I mean the confection served in a classic, tapered soda fountain glass (real glass a must), with a long spoon. Inside is a rhapsody of fountain soda water, a little half-and-half, chocolate syrup and vanilla ice cream.
NEWS
By Joan Jacobson and Joan Jacobson,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1999
Lillian Malas, a teen-age shepherd in her native Greece who became a Baltimore restaurateur -- as famous for her crab cakes as she was for her religious work ethic -- died Saturday at her Reisterstown home. She was 95 and died of natural causes.Mrs. Malas stopped her work in the kitchen of Duffy's, her family's Southwest Baltimore restaurant that closed this year, when she was incapacitated by a stroke, said her daughter Mary Aiello. She had been retired for a year."She seemed to thrive on working.
FEATURES
By Maryalice Yakutchik and Maryalice Yakutchik,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 18, 1996
Alice Alpert used to teach childbirth classes the conventional way: in a hospital over the course of six weeks. She'd lug her teaching materials back and forth each week and watch exhausted couples struggle to pay attention after a long day at work.Then Ms. Alpert, a registered nurse and certified childbirth educator, decided to try something different, something that is now becoming a hot trend in childbirth education: a getaway weekend for prospective parents.One weekend a month, Ms. Alpert transforms Frederick County's historic Catoctin Inn into Childbirth Central.
FEATURES
By EATING WELL MAGAZINE United Feature Syndicate | September 24, 1995
There is always a half-gallon of nonfat or low-fat vanilla frozen yogurt in the test-kitchen freezer here at Eating Well magazine. While it is rather plain on its own, we love to drizzle it with toppings for jazzy but ultra-fast desserts. Here are two ideas for sauces that take only minutes to make.MA The first one is a saucy version of the Louisiana confection.Praline sauceMakes 1 cup2 teaspoons butter1/4 cup chopped pecans (1 ounce)1 cup packed dark brown sugar1/3 cup low-fat milk1 tablespoon cornstarchpinch of saltIn a small saucepan, melt butter over medium heat.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Sun Staff Writer | December 28, 1994
A marble cake made with Hershey syrup plus a crab and artichoke dish will be a treat, this year or next.Bart Kennedy of Baltimore requested a hot crab and artichoke dipnoting that he had been unsuccessful in locating this recipe. "I would appreciate an answer," he wrote.Rochelle Eisenberg, senior account executive with the Old Bay Co. in Baltimore, responded. She sent a recipe that was submitted in a contest Old Bay held in Florida. "It is delicious," Chef Gilles Sygloski says.Hot Artichoke and Crab DipMakes 2 cups1/2 cup mayonnaise1/2 cup sour cream7 ounce can artichoke hearts, chopped and drained.
FEATURES
By Maryalice Yakutchik and Maryalice Yakutchik,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 18, 1996
Alice Alpert used to teach childbirth classes the conventional way: in a hospital over the course of six weeks. She'd lug her teaching materials back and forth each week and watch exhausted couples struggle to pay attention after a long day at work.Then Ms. Alpert, a registered nurse and certified childbirth educator, decided to try something different, something that is now becoming a hot trend in childbirth education: a getaway weekend for prospective parents.One weekend a month, Ms. Alpert transforms Frederick County's historic Catoctin Inn into Childbirth Central.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 2004
Martinis at the Tusk Lounge Where: 942 N. Charles St. (second floor of the Brass Elephant) When: 5 p.m.-2 a.m. Mondays-Saturdays; 4:30 p.m.-2 a.m. Sundays. Why: Because their chocolate martinis are sublime. Ask bartender David Judy to make the drink. He adds a tiny splash of raspberry vodka, coats the rim of the glass in chocolate syrup and only uses real lime juice. Another house specialty is the Green Light. All martinis are $9. The drinks are strong enough to impose a one-round limit - believe us on this one. Information: 410-547-8480 - - Annie Linskey
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | January 27, 1993
When Esther M. Guffy of Ellicott City wrote asking for a chocolate cake recipe, she all but apologized for wanting it. "I know I shouldn't eat this cake, which is like candy fudge and is called a 'decadent chocolate cake.' A bunch of us had some while in Virginia Beach last September," she wrote.Ms. Guffy must first know there is a whole world out there of cake lovers who do not feel at all guilty about eating the decadent chocolate cake for which they sent recipes. Most were similar.Chef Syglowski of the Baltimore International Culinary College, who tests the recipes sent in, chose one from Louanna "Lu" L. White of Severna Park and another from Mary Lou Schmidt of Baltimore who called her cake the "seduction cake."
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