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By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,Staff Writer | September 9, 1992
Something funny will be happening in your kitchen if you follow the recipe requested by Virginia Boucher of Baltimore. "I want a Pennsylvania Dutch recipe called Funny Cake. I remember this dessert from college days in Kutztown, Pa. and I'd like to make it," she wrote.She added that although it is called a funny cake, "it is actually a pie with a chocolate layer. It gets its name from the fact that the chocolate is added to the top of the cake before baking and during baking, thechocolate settles to the bottom."
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By ROB KASPER | June 17, 2009
This Father's Day, think about serving Dad a beer at breakfast, or as a lunch entree, or maybe during dessert. I am not proposing you get dear old Dad soused this Sunday. Rather, I am suggesting you feed him dishes made with beer. Why is this a good idea? First, dads like to eat. Secondly, most dads like beer. Thirdly, it is usually difficult to figure out what to get the guy for Father's Day. He doesn't give his relatives many gift clues. What he really values, of course, is recognition, some acknowledgment of his paternal role, some effort that says, "Thanks, man."
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By Amy Scattergood and Amy Scattergood,Los Angeles Times | December 19, 2007
Watch rivulets of dark chocolate sauce pour down the curves of a scoop of ice cream or over the low cliffs of a raspberry tart and you get a hint of the transformative power of a good chocolate sauce. Thick and velvety, deeply, sensuously flavorful, such a sauce can dress up a simple dessert or, just in time for the holidays, elevate a great one. It's pretty good eaten straight with a spoon, too. Years ago, chocolate sauces were made with bricks of baker's chocolate or cocoa powder, with lots of sugar and vanilla to mask the bitterness, and heavy doses of cream or butter.
NEWS
January 7, 2009
Margaret B. "Peggy" Krebs, a longtime Ruxton resident who was known for her homemade jams and chocolate sauce, died Friday of a stroke at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 91. Margaret Lillington Boyden was born in Washington and raised near Glendale Heights in Prince George's County. She was educated in public and private schools, including St. Catherine's School in Richmond, Va. She attended American University and worked in the offices of the Washington National Cathedral before her 1941 marriage to Leon A. "Krebbie" Krebs.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | May 1, 1994
You know you are an adult when you get to have chocolate sauce on your entree. That happened to me the other night.Out came this big white plate and right in the middle of it was a pheasant swimming in a sauce of liquid chocolate, one of the liquids I was put on earth to absorb.Officially this dish was called Faisan al Chocolate, or braised pheasant in chocolate sauce. I call it . . . It's Great to Be a Grown-Up.It was part of a six-course tribute-to-Spanish-cuisine dinner whipped up at Restaurante Tio Pepe for members of the local chapter of Conferie de la Chaine des Rotisseurs.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2004
Where: 400 E. Saratoga St. When: 6 a.m.-4 p.m. every day of the week. Why: Nothing says retro date like a big, overflowing chocolate milkshake topped with whipped cream, chocolate sauce and sprinkles -- a milkshake that is so thick you need to eat it with a spoon. Happily, the Hollywood Diner in downtown Baltimore knows how to make them. One milkshake costs $2.60, and we recommend sharing one, no matter how hungry you are. Information: 410-962-5379 -- Annie Linskey Cheap Date
FEATURES
By Sherrie Ruhl and Sherrie Ruhl,Evening Sun Staff | October 30, 1991
SCOOPS OF VANILLA ice cream take on a spooky appearance when given a witchy disguise.The hat is made from a chocolate cookie topped with an ice cream cone. The cone is dipped into thick chocolate syrup to "glue" it securely.If you like, sit the ice cream on another cookie and give it candy or raisin eyes.We used Archway-brand cookies for this recipe. Rocky-road chocolate cookies made a terrific brim while old-fashioned molasses cookies, with a scalloped-edge, made a perfect base.These frozen treats go together very quickly, making them a perfect choice for Halloween parties.
FEATURES
By Bev Bennett and Bev Bennett,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | January 3, 2001
I don't know how cream puffs became associated with lightweight, as in "She's such a cream puff." This mixture of egg, flour and butter may look like a cloud, but it has a foundation of steel. How else could a cream puff hold ice cream, custards, sauces and more? What's more, it's a mystery that some cooks think a cream puff is complicated and takes a lot of effort. Not so. If you can beat a cake batter, you can make a cream puff. You'll soon become so proficient that you'll look for exotic cream-puff variations.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL & JANE STERN | January 6, 1991
BUFFALO, N.Y. -- Buffalonians sure like candy and ice cream. Among traveling gourmets, the Nickel City is best known for its spicy hot chicken wings and its roast beef sandwiches on caraway-seed hard rolls, both of which are terrific; but it is impossible to eat one's way around town without noticing that nearly everywhere you go there are stands, stores, shops and parlors touting their ice cream specialties and hand-dipped candies.The candy selection, at its best purveyors, is nothing less than spectacular.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 28, 2002
Some taste pleasures of childhood lose their charm as the years go by. Bubble gum, Sugar Daddies, even Red Hots no longer tempt me. Milkshakes are a different matter. I loved them then. I love them now. And I'm not alone. When my parents piled my brothers and me into the car for road trips, we would wait for the magic words. "If anybody else wants a milkshake ... " my mother would say. She never had to finish the sentence. After painstaking research, selflessly volunteering myself and pressing into service several willing adults and children as guinea pigs, I have concluded that the perfect milkshake exists but that it can differ for each person, even if only slightly.
NEWS
By Amy Scattergood and Amy Scattergood,Los Angeles Times | December 19, 2007
Watch rivulets of dark chocolate sauce pour down the curves of a scoop of ice cream or over the low cliffs of a raspberry tart and you get a hint of the transformative power of a good chocolate sauce. Thick and velvety, deeply, sensuously flavorful, such a sauce can dress up a simple dessert or, just in time for the holidays, elevate a great one. It's pretty good eaten straight with a spoon, too. Years ago, chocolate sauces were made with bricks of baker's chocolate or cocoa powder, with lots of sugar and vanilla to mask the bitterness, and heavy doses of cream or butter.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM | February 11, 2006
I confess to being a chocoholic. Nearly every day I reward myself with a chocolate treat. It might be a butter-rich chocolate chip cookie, a Hershey kiss (with an almond inside) or a chocolate-coated biscotti. As long as there's chocolate in it, I'm in heaven. It probably wouldn't surprise you, then, to learn that Valentine's Day is one of my favorite days of the year. I always make something that has chocolate. This year, I'm preparing Napoleons filled with coffee-scented mascarpone cream and drizzling them with warm bittersweet chocolate sauce.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | November 12, 2005
One of our good friends, a busy journalist and college professor, entertains more often than anyone I know and does so effortlessly and with much pleasure. Her success, I've discovered, is due to several factors. First, she plans simple menus, many of which include quickly grilled or sauteed meats accompanied by roasted seasonal vegetables. And even though she loves to cook, she has no reservations about supplementing her homemade fare with an appetizer from a neighborhood deli or a dessert from a local bakery.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | September 18, 2005
For a town as steeped in history as Annapolis is, it has a lot of restaurants that look to the future instead of the past. The newest is the Metropolitan, an engaging combination of cutting-edge style, frenetically high energy and quiet artistry in the kitchen. The contemporary space, which takes up several floors, is minimalist but comfortable. The whites and creams of the decor are soothing, a stark contrast to the young, jazzed-up bar crowds. If the weather stays nice, make the trek up three flights of stairs to eat on the roof.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | December 9, 2004
LET'S BEGIN with the premise that you like to eat fast food and you don't get all weepy each time you step in front of a mirror and see two chins and your gut spilling over your belt. You don't go to Burger King for the Fire-Grilled Garden Salad, and you don't care how much weight that whiny Jared lost at Subway. And for you, the darkest day in American history was the day McDonald's announced it would no longer super-size its drinks and fries. Pal, this one's for you. Because this one's about Hardee's new Monster Thickburger, and you sound like the target customer.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2004
Where: 400 E. Saratoga St. When: 6 a.m.-4 p.m. every day of the week. Why: Nothing says retro date like a big, overflowing chocolate milkshake topped with whipped cream, chocolate sauce and sprinkles -- a milkshake that is so thick you need to eat it with a spoon. Happily, the Hollywood Diner in downtown Baltimore knows how to make them. One milkshake costs $2.60, and we recommend sharing one, no matter how hungry you are. Information: 410-962-5379 -- Annie Linskey Cheap Date
NEWS
January 7, 2009
Margaret B. "Peggy" Krebs, a longtime Ruxton resident who was known for her homemade jams and chocolate sauce, died Friday of a stroke at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 91. Margaret Lillington Boyden was born in Washington and raised near Glendale Heights in Prince George's County. She was educated in public and private schools, including St. Catherine's School in Richmond, Va. She attended American University and worked in the offices of the Washington National Cathedral before her 1941 marriage to Leon A. "Krebbie" Krebs.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM | February 11, 2006
I confess to being a chocoholic. Nearly every day I reward myself with a chocolate treat. It might be a butter-rich chocolate chip cookie, a Hershey kiss (with an almond inside) or a chocolate-coated biscotti. As long as there's chocolate in it, I'm in heaven. It probably wouldn't surprise you, then, to learn that Valentine's Day is one of my favorite days of the year. I always make something that has chocolate. This year, I'm preparing Napoleons filled with coffee-scented mascarpone cream and drizzling them with warm bittersweet chocolate sauce.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robin Tunnicliff and Robin Tunnicliff,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 19, 2002
Bless Morris Martick. As the 79-year-old chef approaches his eighth decade, he's still turning out some of the tastiest, most eclectic Gallic-inspired chow in Baltimore. And he's preparing it by himself in the un-air-conditioned kitchen of the 19th-century townhouse where he was born. "When they repealed Prohibition in 1932, we were the first people in Baltimore to get a liquor license," he says. "We started out as a grocery store in 1917, but we were really bootleggers." Which would explain why his eponymous restaurant feels like a speakeasy.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 28, 2002
Some taste pleasures of childhood lose their charm as the years go by. Bubble gum, Sugar Daddies, even Red Hots no longer tempt me. Milkshakes are a different matter. I loved them then. I love them now. And I'm not alone. When my parents piled my brothers and me into the car for road trips, we would wait for the magic words. "If anybody else wants a milkshake ... " my mother would say. She never had to finish the sentence. After painstaking research, selflessly volunteering myself and pressing into service several willing adults and children as guinea pigs, I have concluded that the perfect milkshake exists but that it can differ for each person, even if only slightly.
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