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Chocolate Milk

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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2012
Baltimore's own Carmelo Anthony is the latest celebrity to don a milk mustache. Except his is chocolate. The Knicks star is helping launch the latest campaign for the Milk Processsor Education Program, which is famous for the "Got Milk?" campaign and milk mustaches. The new spin is  "Got Chocolate Milk?" Melo was all over the place Monday promoting the drink, first on the Mike & Mike radio show, then on to Dan Patrick. He Tweeted about both appearances. Anthony will be appearing in print and television ads touting the health and workout benefits of chugging chocolate milk.
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SPORTS
By Cody Goodwin, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
D.J. Grindle has heard nothing but great things about the chocolate milk. Up in Fargo, N.D., on the campus of North Dakota State University, the chocolate milk is part of wrestling lore. The taste is prime, even if the glasses are small. Wrestlers brag about it whenever they return to their home states. "That's what everyone's told me," Grindle said. A graduated senior from Perry Hall, Grindle said he plans of see what all the fuss is about over the next week. He and the rest of Team Maryland will be in Fargo for the USA Wrestling Cadet and Junior National Wrestling Championships, which are held every year at the FargoDome.
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FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | November 11, 1998
Appealing appetizers for the party seasonIf you're planning to entertain this holiday season, the just-published "Hors d'Oeuvres" (William Morrow & Co., $23) is required reading. New York magazine food writer Gillian Duffy has gathered more than 80 recipes for party tidbits from chefs and caterers. Your guests will love their curried mussels with sweet red pepper, spicy Asian chicken wings, white bean bruschetta and more. Fabulous photos let you see what these works of art should look like.
NEWS
December 10, 2013
Donna St. George reports in The Washington Post that the Montgomery County Public Schools have decided to address a serious hindrance to the education of students in that county: strawberry milk. In a move that seems to defy logic, the county has decided to take away strawberry milk:  Come January, school cafeterias in Montgomery County will be missing the pinkest offering of the lunch line. Strawberry-flavored milk is on its way out. St. George reports: "The drink is not as popular as chocolate milk and not as nutritious as plain milk, officials say. So at a time of growing concern about healthy foods for children, the pink milk has lost its place on refrigerated shelves in Maryland's largest school system.
NEWS
December 10, 2013
Donna St. George reports in The Washington Post that the Montgomery County Public Schools have decided to address a serious hindrance to the education of students in that county: strawberry milk. In a move that seems to defy logic, the county has decided to take away strawberry milk:  Come January, school cafeterias in Montgomery County will be missing the pinkest offering of the lunch line. Strawberry-flavored milk is on its way out. St. George reports: "The drink is not as popular as chocolate milk and not as nutritious as plain milk, officials say. So at a time of growing concern about healthy foods for children, the pink milk has lost its place on refrigerated shelves in Maryland's largest school system.
NEWS
By Tanika White | July 24, 2005
For Karen Williamson and her daughter, Tess Russell, persuading manufacturers to produce women's shoes in sizes 10, 11, 12 and up was no easy feat. Sizes larger than 9 have long been considered hard to sell. But the Baltimore-based duo knew of what they spoke. Russell wears a size 11. Many of her friends do, too. "There are so many women out there with big feet," Williamson said. "So we went to designers and said, 'If we can order enough, will you make these bigger sizes?' " And that's how Barefoot Tess, an online shoe store for women with big feet, was born.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2010
Brigitte Shaterman from Glen Burnie was looking for a recipe she lost for making a frozen peanut butter treat using Knox unflavored gelatin, peanut butter and other ingredients she can no longer recall. She said that the little frozen goodie was a favorite of her daughter's when she was growing up and that now her daughter would like to make them for her own children. Regina Stein from Baltimore had a recipe for "Peanut Pops" which she says comes from the Knox Gelatine Cookbook (1977)
SPORTS
By Cody Goodwin, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2014
D.J. Grindle has heard nothing but great things about the chocolate milk. Up in Fargo, N.D., on the campus of North Dakota State University, the chocolate milk is part of wrestling lore. The taste is prime, even if the glasses are small. Wrestlers brag about it whenever they return to their home states. "That's what everyone's told me," Grindle said. A graduated senior from Perry Hall, Grindle said he plans of see what all the fuss is about over the next week. He and the rest of Team Maryland will be in Fargo for the USA Wrestling Cadet and Junior National Wrestling Championships, which are held every year at the FargoDome.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writer | July 14, 1991
Spying a chocolate doughnut in the lunch box, 7-year-old Michelle Riviera took a big bite of her ham-and-cheese sandwich and hastily reached for her milk.Between sips, she giggled with a group of friends clustered around the table at Van Bokkelen Elementary School. But their laughter was drowned out by the din as 100 children talked excitedly and scampered about the lunchroom."I like everything here," announced Jaymika Mitchell, one of the children from Meade Village and Pioneer City enjoying six weeks of free food and fun.With help from the Dream Team, a new coalition ofcounty officials and children's advocates, the Anne Arundel Housing Authority received a federal grant to offer a lunch program this summer.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | February 26, 1992
Waverly took a hard blow a few weeks ago. Its Little Tavern closed.For as long as most Greenmount Avenue regulars can remember, devotees bought hamburgers "by the bagful" at the green-roofed cottage at 32nd Street and Merryman Lane.A waitress named Iris, who worked at the Little Tavern until it closed last month, said the 24-hour-a-day operation just wasn't doing well. "The people would come in and order a cup of coffee and sit there for hours. They wouldn't order anything else. We couldn't stay open that way. And now that we're closed there, they don't like it," she said.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2012
Baltimore's own Carmelo Anthony is the latest celebrity to don a milk mustache. Except his is chocolate. The Knicks star is helping launch the latest campaign for the Milk Processsor Education Program, which is famous for the "Got Milk?" campaign and milk mustaches. The new spin is  "Got Chocolate Milk?" Melo was all over the place Monday promoting the drink, first on the Mike & Mike radio show, then on to Dan Patrick. He Tweeted about both appearances. Anthony will be appearing in print and television ads touting the health and workout benefits of chugging chocolate milk.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2011
While the weather forecast for Saturdays' Ravens game is in the high 40s - not exactly Green Bay territory - it can get chilly after being outside for a while. One of the best ways to keep the cold at bay is with a cup of spicy hot chocolate. Traditionally, hot chocolate is just a thicker version of chocolate milk. This version is rich and full of character, thanks to cinnamon, orange peel and chiles. Don't be afraid - it's not as spicy as you might think. There is a little bite at the end, but nothing that will make you breathe fire.
NEWS
January 18, 2011
The alcoholic energy drink Four Loko has been in the news lately because of its high alcohol content and its popularity with our youth. The hospitalization of several college students prompted many universities to issue warnings about the potency of this drink, which had the nicknames of "blackout in a can" and "liquid cocaine. " A sweet flavor, the alcohol content of roughly four beers, as much caffeine as two cups of coffee, and a price tag under $4 prompted the Food and Drug Administration to ban this beverage.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | October 19, 2010
Brigitte Shaterman from Glen Burnie was looking for a recipe she lost for making a frozen peanut butter treat using Knox unflavored gelatin, peanut butter and other ingredients she can no longer recall. She said that the little frozen goodie was a favorite of her daughter's when she was growing up and that now her daughter would like to make them for her own children. Regina Stein from Baltimore had a recipe for "Peanut Pops" which she says comes from the Knox Gelatine Cookbook (1977)
NEWS
By LEONARD PITTS JR | January 22, 2006
God bless Chocolate City and its vanilla suburbs. - Parliament WASHINGTON -- Apparently, the mayor is a funkateer. That's what you call fans of Parliament, the '70s-era funk band famed for hits such as "Give Up The Funk (Tear The Roof Off The Sucker)," "Flash Light" and "Aqua Boogie (A Psychoalphadiscobetabioaquadoloop)." Parliament also recorded "Chocolate City," leader George Clinton's whimsical take on growing black political clout as reflected in the election of black mayors in such towns as Newark, N.J., Gary, Ind., Los Angeles and Washington.
NEWS
By Tanika White | July 24, 2005
For Karen Williamson and her daughter, Tess Russell, persuading manufacturers to produce women's shoes in sizes 10, 11, 12 and up was no easy feat. Sizes larger than 9 have long been considered hard to sell. But the Baltimore-based duo knew of what they spoke. Russell wears a size 11. Many of her friends do, too. "There are so many women out there with big feet," Williamson said. "So we went to designers and said, 'If we can order enough, will you make these bigger sizes?' " And that's how Barefoot Tess, an online shoe store for women with big feet, was born.
FEATURES
By Suzanne Loudermilk | April 7, 1999
TV dinners hit 45-year mark In 1954, while mesmerized Americans watched "Roy Rogers," "Burns and Allen" and "Father Knows Best" on the tube, they also were getting their first taste of Swanson TV Dinners. To celebrate its 45th anniversary, Swanson is distributing limited-edition packaging with the original design of its frozen meals. Forty-five of the boxes also will feature authentic aluminum trays with a grand-prize winning game piece for a 52-inch color television. Search is under way for crab creations Phillips Seafood Restaurants wants your favorite crab dish.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2011
While the weather forecast for Saturdays' Ravens game is in the high 40s - not exactly Green Bay territory - it can get chilly after being outside for a while. One of the best ways to keep the cold at bay is with a cup of spicy hot chocolate. Traditionally, hot chocolate is just a thicker version of chocolate milk. This version is rich and full of character, thanks to cinnamon, orange peel and chiles. Don't be afraid - it's not as spicy as you might think. There is a little bite at the end, but nothing that will make you breathe fire.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs, Scott Calvert and Rona Kobell and Johnathon E. Briggs, Scott Calvert and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | January 1, 2003
Hundreds of thousands of Marylanders welcomed 2003 with revelry and reflection last night, from traditional celebrations in Baltimore and Annapolis to area religious services. In Baltimore, organizers of the city's annual midnight fireworks extravaganza at the Inner Harbor expected a crowd of more than 100,000, betting that the mild New Year's Eve weather -- temperatures in the 40s as opposed to the bone-chilling winds of celebrations past -- would boost turnout. But the stage for celebration downtown had been set well before 12 -- noon, that is. Port Discovery children's museum held its fifth annual free New Year's bash for hundreds of little revelers who were unlikely to see midnight.
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