Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChocolate Ice Cream
IN THE NEWS

Chocolate Ice Cream

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By LIA GORMSEN | July 15, 2006
What it is -- The latest flavor from Haagen-Dazs: rich chocolate ice cream swirled with fudge and in fused with cinnamon. What we like about it --The chocolate falls nicely between dark and milk, with the sweetness from the cinnamon masking any hint of bitterness. The result is just what we've come to expect from Haagen-Dazs: rich, creamy, calorie-laden goodness. Inspired by an ancient-Mayan recipe, this exotic treat is quite fattening as well; check out the saturated-fat content before you indulge.
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown and Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2010
W hen an annual fundraising event is closing in on its 20th year, you might think it had grown a bit long in the tooth. But not when the tooth involved is the sweet tooth. Health Care for the Homeless' 19th Annual Chocolate Affair stretched from one end of M&T Bank Stadium's South Club Level Lounge to the other. Event chairs Caryn Sagal and Sharon Bunch announced a new attendance record of 1,600. "Every year, this gets bigger and bigger," said Maria Tildon, CareFirst senior vice president.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 28, 2002
Some taste pleasures of childhood lose their charm as the years go by. Bubble gum, Sugar Daddies, even Red Hots no longer tempt me. Milkshakes are a different matter. I loved them then. I love them now. And I'm not alone. When my parents piled my brothers and me into the car for road trips, we would wait for the magic words. "If anybody else wants a milkshake ... " my mother would say. She never had to finish the sentence. After painstaking research, selflessly volunteering myself and pressing into service several willing adults and children as guinea pigs, I have concluded that the perfect milkshake exists but that it can differ for each person, even if only slightly.
FEATURES
February 11, 2008
Let's begin by saying that when it comes to chocolate, I have been around the block a few times and am pretty much considered the last word on the subject now. That's because I just served as a celebrity judge at this year's Chocolate Affair at M&T Bank Stadium, which shows you how much the term celebrity has been devalued in this country. Anyway, the Chocolate Affair is the annual fundraiser for Health Care for the Homeless, during which they roll out all these wonderful concoctions from Baltimore chocolatiers, restaurants and caterers, and some 1,500 people stand around stuffing their faces and feeling their cholesterol levels shoot through the roof.
FEATURES
By Sloane Brown and Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 7, 2010
W hen an annual fundraising event is closing in on its 20th year, you might think it had grown a bit long in the tooth. But not when the tooth involved is the sweet tooth. Health Care for the Homeless' 19th Annual Chocolate Affair stretched from one end of M&T Bank Stadium's South Club Level Lounge to the other. Event chairs Caryn Sagal and Sharon Bunch announced a new attendance record of 1,600. "Every year, this gets bigger and bigger," said Maria Tildon, CareFirst senior vice president.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2004
Pastries are nonpartisan. Cream butter and sugar just enough, stir in flour to that point where mush metamorphoses into batter, maybe add the secret ingredient of hard-boiled egg yolks for flavor, and anyone from Ronald Reagan to Bill Clinton will be happy. Roland Mesnier spent 25 years at the White House working under that philosophy, whisking and churning and kneading for the right, the left and various presidential guests in between. Now, the executive presidential pastry chef, who retired from Pennsylvania Avenue earlier this year, has written a book for home cooks - for those aspiring to the simple post-supper treat or for those ready to create the state-dinner showstopper.
FEATURES
February 11, 2008
Let's begin by saying that when it comes to chocolate, I have been around the block a few times and am pretty much considered the last word on the subject now. That's because I just served as a celebrity judge at this year's Chocolate Affair at M&T Bank Stadium, which shows you how much the term celebrity has been devalued in this country. Anyway, the Chocolate Affair is the annual fundraiser for Health Care for the Homeless, during which they roll out all these wonderful concoctions from Baltimore chocolatiers, restaurants and caterers, and some 1,500 people stand around stuffing their faces and feeling their cholesterol levels shoot through the roof.
NEWS
October 5, 2003
Commercial salad dressings are about 90 percent fat, or about nine grams of fat per tablespoon. That means that a packet of Thousand Island dressing from a fast-food restaurant can contain more fat than a cup of Ben & Jerry's premium chocolate ice cream. -- Take a Load Off Your Heart (Workman Publishing, 2003)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2011
The Center for the Science in the Public Interest, which has done more good for the health of Americans than its legion of detractors has released its annual Xtreme Eating Awards, the most egregious items on chain menus. Here's what they say about the Cold Stone Creamery PB&C Shake : Even people accustomed to 1,500-calorie burgers wouldn't expect 2,000-calorie shakes. A 24-oz. “Gotta Have It” size shake of peanut butter, chocolate ice cream and milk has a day's calories (2,010)
NEWS
February 7, 2011
In your Feb. 3 article "School choice finds a welcome in Baltimore," much respectful attention is paid to critics of school choice like Diane Ravitch, who is quoted as complaining that choice programs "introduce friction into districts, splitting communities as parents battle over space and who gets to which schools. " This reminds me of my mother's reason for depriving my young, hungry self and my five siblings of goodies such as cherries and chocolate ice cream: "Ten minutes after I bring it in the house, you guys just eat it up and there is nothing left.
FEATURES
By LIA GORMSEN | July 15, 2006
What it is -- The latest flavor from Haagen-Dazs: rich chocolate ice cream swirled with fudge and in fused with cinnamon. What we like about it --The chocolate falls nicely between dark and milk, with the sweetness from the cinnamon masking any hint of bitterness. The result is just what we've come to expect from Haagen-Dazs: rich, creamy, calorie-laden goodness. Inspired by an ancient-Mayan recipe, this exotic treat is quite fattening as well; check out the saturated-fat content before you indulge.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2004
Pastries are nonpartisan. Cream butter and sugar just enough, stir in flour to that point where mush metamorphoses into batter, maybe add the secret ingredient of hard-boiled egg yolks for flavor, and anyone from Ronald Reagan to Bill Clinton will be happy. Roland Mesnier spent 25 years at the White House working under that philosophy, whisking and churning and kneading for the right, the left and various presidential guests in between. Now, the executive presidential pastry chef, who retired from Pennsylvania Avenue earlier this year, has written a book for home cooks - for those aspiring to the simple post-supper treat or for those ready to create the state-dinner showstopper.
NEWS
By Sara Engram and Sara Engram,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 28, 2002
Some taste pleasures of childhood lose their charm as the years go by. Bubble gum, Sugar Daddies, even Red Hots no longer tempt me. Milkshakes are a different matter. I loved them then. I love them now. And I'm not alone. When my parents piled my brothers and me into the car for road trips, we would wait for the magic words. "If anybody else wants a milkshake ... " my mother would say. She never had to finish the sentence. After painstaking research, selflessly volunteering myself and pressing into service several willing adults and children as guinea pigs, I have concluded that the perfect milkshake exists but that it can differ for each person, even if only slightly.
NEWS
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,[Sun reporter] | January 10, 2007
Greenleaf's Grille & Treat Street Food court -- 410-821-7631 Hours --11 a.m.-9:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays; 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Saturdays-Sundays Ready in --2 minutes A waffle cone filled with soft, smooth mint chocolate-chip ice cream was a perfect way to round out our day at the mall. It cost $3.78 and was filled with thick, dark chocolate chips.
NEWS
By Bill Daley and Bill Daley,Chicago Tribune | March 21, 2007
Fresh salmon is so rich it needs very little to highlight its warm flavor. For me, freshly minced ginger, a handful of chopped green onions or parsley and a drizzle of soy sauce are enough. I leave the skin on the fish when roasting; it helps hold the fillet together while cooking and it enhances the flavor to a degree. (The skin may stick to the hot baking pan. Don't worry; carefully lift the cooked fillet off the skin and onto a plate.) Serve this salmon with a simple green salad, white rice and steamed cauliflower florets sauteed briefly in curry-seasoned hot butter.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.