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NEWS
August 6, 2003
On August 3, 2003, EVELYN MARGARET CHOATE (nee Emminizer); beloved wife of the late Donald Maurice Choate; loving mother of Donald M. Choate, Sr. and his wife Marlyn and Lawrence P. Choate and his wife Joanne; cherished grandmother of Donald M. Choate, Jr., Lisa Reissig and Lauren Ohlinger; great-grandmother of four. Relatives and friends may call Charles S. Zeiller Funeral Home, Inc., 6224 Eastern Avenue, on Wednesday, from 3 to 5 and 7 to 9, where a Funeral Service will be held on Thursday, at 10 A.M. Interment Oaklawn Cemetery.
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NEWS
By The Washington Post | May 11, 2009
ROBERT B. CHOATE JR., 84 Led fight for cereal nutrition labels Robert B. Choate Jr., a self-styled "citizen lobbyist" who in the 1960s and 1970s played a vital role in exposing malnutrition in America and was best remembered for embarrassing cereal companies into providing nutritional labels on their boxes, died May 3 at a retirement community in Lemon Grove, Calif. He had a medical condition that prevented him from swallowing. Mr. Choate was a civil engineer before reinventing himself in the late 1950s as a philanthropist, and consumer advocate.
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NEWS
By The Washington Post | May 11, 2009
ROBERT B. CHOATE JR., 84 Led fight for cereal nutrition labels Robert B. Choate Jr., a self-styled "citizen lobbyist" who in the 1960s and 1970s played a vital role in exposing malnutrition in America and was best remembered for embarrassing cereal companies into providing nutritional labels on their boxes, died May 3 at a retirement community in Lemon Grove, Calif. He had a medical condition that prevented him from swallowing. Mr. Choate was a civil engineer before reinventing himself in the late 1950s as a philanthropist, and consumer advocate.
NEWS
January 28, 2009
On January 26, 2009, Hazel Marie Choate; (nee Lundy) of Mayo, MD, formerly of Bel Air, MD. Beloved wife of the late William Posey Choate; devoted mother of William H. Choate. Also survived by three grandchildren, Lisa M. Swank, Karen E. Ward, Sarah L. Durbin; and four great-grandsons. Services will be held at the family owned McComas Funeral Home, P.A., Bel Air, MD on Saturday, January 31, 2009 at 11 a.m. Interment will be in Bel Air Memorial Gardens, Bel Air, MD. Friends may call at the funeral home in Bel Air on Saturday from 10-11 a.m. prior to the service.
NEWS
September 15, 1996
ROSS PEROT'S failure to find a mainstream politician willing to be his vice presidential running mate on the Reform Party ticket shows the difficulty of bucking the two-party system. In turning to economist Pat Choate, who shares Mr. Perot's opposition to free trade and his desire to reform Social Security and other budget-busting entitlement programs, he keeps his intellectual position alive.This may not get the Texas billionaire to the double digits he enjoyed in 1992. But if he wins what is rightly his -- a place for himself and Mr. Choate in presidential and vice-presidential debates -- he can confront issues Bill Clinton and Bob Dole would rather avoid.
NEWS
September 30, 1996
Harold L. Tinker, 99, a prep-school teacher who was a mentor to President John F. Kennedy, died Sept. 21.He taught for 39 years at the Choate School in Wallingford, Conn., inspiring students with his motto, "Dispute the text." He ushered many well-known students from Choate into the world. One who made a habit of returning was Mr. Kennedy.During his years in Congress, Mr. Kennedy would stop in Wallingford on his way to or from Boston or Washington to talk to his former teacher.Mr. Tinker's book collection of 19th- and 20th-century literary works was said to be worth tens of thousands of dollars when he donated 3,000 volumes to his alma mater, Brown University.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | June 11, 1996
It didn't take long to separate the haves from the have-nots at the National Prep Team Championships yesterday, unless you think a bunch of people squeegeeing off tennis courts at 6: 30 in the morning and play going on more than 12 hours later qualifies as a full day's work.When the futile sopping up of the McDonogh School courts was done, play for two-thirds of the six teams competing was moved indoors, then back outdoors and the last ball was struck for a winner, a few things were apparent:Host McDonogh and Deerfield (Mass.
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | June 30, 1994
At Frank's Seafood, a wholesale fish market near Jessup, Joanne Choate wipes perspiration off her brow and holds up a finger in my direction. "I'll be with you in a minute," she says.She is standing near the center of the store with some customers, scooping live crabs out of a gigantic tub. The crabs seem irritated -- they wave their claws, they scuttle over each other, they clank against the metal sides of the tub like unruly inmates.A radio is playing the Beatles' "Can't Buy Me Love."L "One more second," Ms. Choate says, as more customers enter.
NEWS
February 24, 2002
Edna B. Parron, 81, Social Security employee Edna B. Parron, a retired Social Security Administration employee, died of respiratory failure at Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center and Hospital on Monday. She was 81. Mrs. Parron, known as Bernice, was active in church work and Girl Scouting. In 1962, she was honored by the Baltimore City Health Department for her volunteer work in a successful citywide campaign to inoculate children against polio, a now-rare disease, which was a dreaded killer before universal vaccination.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1997
Paul Tines will be remembered for many things at the St.Paul's schools.For a Peter Pan that appeared to really fly.For moving dramas on AIDS and date rape.For Shakespeare in the garden with fireworks and flaming torches.But more than for dazzling performances, Tines will be remembered for making theater "awesome," "cool," a thing to do the Brooklandville prep school campuses."More and more athletes come to auditions. We had the captain of the football team in one show. That was unheard of, unheard of," Tines said as he prepared for his last St. Paul's production, this weekend's run of "A Midsummer Night's Dream."
NEWS
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,Sun Reporter | September 9, 2007
Casual dressing is such a staple of modern American life, it's easy to forget that there once was a time when people dressed for dinner, or for the theater, or simply to go out for the day. That's why it was heartwarming to spy Bert Choate strolling through shops in White Marsh, looking dapper in a suit, tie and snazzy hat. Everything on this stylish gent was matched with something else: Shoes to suit. Tie to pocket square. Hat to belt. And his manners and smile matched the entire polished outfit.
NEWS
February 24, 2002
Edna B. Parron, 81, Social Security employee Edna B. Parron, a retired Social Security Administration employee, died of respiratory failure at Levindale Hebrew Geriatric Center and Hospital on Monday. She was 81. Mrs. Parron, known as Bernice, was active in church work and Girl Scouting. In 1962, she was honored by the Baltimore City Health Department for her volunteer work in a successful citywide campaign to inoculate children against polio, a now-rare disease, which was a dreaded killer before universal vaccination.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2001
PHOENIX - Arizona's Craig Counsell continues to take this October stuff seriously. His reputation for playoff heroics already established, Counsell added to it last night by hitting a bases-empty home run off Mike Mussina in the first inning to wipe out a 1-0 deficit in Game 1 of the World Series. The Diamondbacks never let up, pounding Mussina and reliever Randy Choate in a 9-1 victory over the New York Yankees before the largest crowd ever at Bank One Ballpark. Counsell got them started with a 383-foot shot to right field on a 2-1 pitch that stayed up over the plate.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | May 16, 1997
Paul Tines will be remembered for many things at the St.Paul's schools.For a Peter Pan that appeared to really fly.For moving dramas on AIDS and date rape.For Shakespeare in the garden with fireworks and flaming torches.But more than for dazzling performances, Tines will be remembered for making theater "awesome," "cool," a thing to do the Brooklandville prep school campuses."More and more athletes come to auditions. We had the captain of the football team in one show. That was unheard of, unheard of," Tines said as he prepared for his last St. Paul's production, this weekend's run of "A Midsummer Night's Dream."
NEWS
September 30, 1996
Harold L. Tinker, 99, a prep-school teacher who was a mentor to President John F. Kennedy, died Sept. 21.He taught for 39 years at the Choate School in Wallingford, Conn., inspiring students with his motto, "Dispute the text." He ushered many well-known students from Choate into the world. One who made a habit of returning was Mr. Kennedy.During his years in Congress, Mr. Kennedy would stop in Wallingford on his way to or from Boston or Washington to talk to his former teacher.Mr. Tinker's book collection of 19th- and 20th-century literary works was said to be worth tens of thousands of dollars when he donated 3,000 volumes to his alma mater, Brown University.
NEWS
September 15, 1996
ROSS PEROT'S failure to find a mainstream politician willing to be his vice presidential running mate on the Reform Party ticket shows the difficulty of bucking the two-party system. In turning to economist Pat Choate, who shares Mr. Perot's opposition to free trade and his desire to reform Social Security and other budget-busting entitlement programs, he keeps his intellectual position alive.This may not get the Texas billionaire to the double digits he enjoyed in 1992. But if he wins what is rightly his -- a place for himself and Mr. Choate in presidential and vice-presidential debates -- he can confront issues Bill Clinton and Bob Dole would rather avoid.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | October 28, 2001
PHOENIX - Arizona's Craig Counsell continues to take this October stuff seriously. His reputation for playoff heroics already established, Counsell added to it last night by hitting a bases-empty home run off Mike Mussina in the first inning to wipe out a 1-0 deficit in Game 1 of the World Series. The Diamondbacks never let up, pounding Mussina and reliever Randy Choate in a 9-1 victory over the New York Yankees before the largest crowd ever at Bank One Ballpark. Counsell got them started with a 383-foot shot to right field on a 2-1 pitch that stayed up over the plate.
NEWS
By SANDY GRADY | September 15, 1996
Go ahead and say it: Pat who?Easy to snicker at Ross Perot's choice to be his running mate: Bearded, burly Pat Choate, a Mr. Anonymous unknown beyond Beltway think tanks or his Maypearl, Texas, hometown.OK, so Choate's no political slamdunk that will cause terror in the Dole and Clinton camps. Or jar Perot's ratings out of single digits.It'll take more than the half-million bucks Perot spent on Tuesday night's CBS infomercial to make Pat Choate a household name. Maybe Ross should invest in a zillion bumper stickers: "CHOATE AS IN VOTE."
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