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By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1995
A 52-year-old accountant, described by prosecutors as "reckless and grossly negligent," was convicted yesterday in the 1993 chloroform-inhalation death of his 20-year-old girlfriend.Melvin Robert Bowers was found guilty of involuntary manslaughter for giving Geneva Marie Hodge a deadly dose of chloroform to treat a toothache on Sept. 6, 1993 -- despite defense claims that her death was an accident.Bowers, who lived in Ellicott City at the time of the incident but has since moved to Baltimore, could be sentenced to up to 10 years in prison.
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By Fred Rasmussen | February 8, 1998
150 years ago in The SunFeb. 8: American Telegraph Company -- His honor, the Mayor, a few days ago vetoed a resolution passed by the city council, authorizing the American Telegraph Company to place poles in the streets to support the telegraph wires.Feb. 11: Use of Chloroform -- We learn that some of our most eminent surgeons have been using the chloroform in their operations in this city. We understand that it was administered to a lady in the infirmary on Thursday, and while under its influence she underwent a most painful operation, by Prof.
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NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | October 9, 1993
A financial consultant has been indicted on charges of manslaughter and reckless endangerment in connection with the death of a 20-year-old woman who authorities say died from inhaling chloroform in his Ellicott City home.A Howard County grand jury indicted Melvin Robert Bowers Thursday in the Sept. 6 death of Geneva Marie Hodge of Baltimore. Mr. Bowers, 50, also is charged with inhaling harmful substances.Deputy Public Defender Louis Willemin, who is representing Mr. Bowers, said that he did not expect the indictment.
NEWS
February 12, 1996
AMID CRITICISM OF the minimum sentence for a Howard County man convicted of involuntary manslaughter in the 1993 chloroform death of his girlfriend, attention is again focused on the state's judicial sentencing guidelines and on their application.The case poses troubling questions for many who support the concept of sentencing guidelines and the traditional independence of the judiciary. Widespread reaction seemed a mixture of perplexity and outrage at the four-month sentence handed down last month by Circuit Judge Raymond J. Kane Jr. to Melvin R. Bowers, who admitted placing a chloroform-soaked rag over the face of his companion in bed. Victims rights advocates charged that the short jail term reflected a devaluation of human life by the court, and little example for deterrence of future such crimes.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | September 13, 1992
The Harford County Health Department sought to assure residents of the Beechwood Lane community that their well water is safe, despite test results that found six of seven wells contained trace amounts of chloroform.The department is collecting information from residents who have complained that at least six of their neighbors have cancer, which they feared could be traced to contaminated water after learning that one well in the neighborhood contained traces of a gasoline additive."There is no reason to panic," said Woody Williams, a supervising sanitarian with the Harford County Health Department.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | August 25, 1994
A Howard County jury convicted an Ellicott City man yesterday of reckless endangerment in the chloroform-inhalation death of his 20-year-old girlfriend in September.But the jury of seven women and five men deadlocked on a more serious charge of manslaughter and acquitted Bowers of a charge of inhaling harmful substances.The jury deliberated nearly six hours before reaching its verdict against Melvin Robert Bowers, 51, after a three-day trial in Howard Circuit Court.Senior Assistant State's Attorney Joseph Murtha said he will meet with his supervisors and the family of Geneva Marie Hodge, the victim, to determine if Bowers will be tried again on the manslaughter charge.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | March 8, 1994
County prosecutors will be permitted to use at trial the statements an Ellicott City accountant gave to police describing the night of his girlfriend's chloroform-inhalation death, according to a ruling issued by a Howard Circuit Court judge yesterday.Judge James Dudley's decision came after a hearing in which Melvin Robert Bowers testified that investigators badgered him into making a statement after his arrest in the Sept. 6 death of 20-year-old Geneva Marie Hodge of Baltimore.The judge denied a request from Mr. Bowers' attorney to suppress the statements.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff Writer | September 28, 1993
State medical examiners say a 20-year-old Baltimore woman whose body was found three weeks ago in the home of an Ellicott City financial consultant died after inhaling chloroform.But Dr. James Locke, an assistant medical examiner, said that the Sept. 20 autopsy could not determine whether the Sept. 6 death of Geneva Marie Hodge was a homicide or was accidental.Melvin Robert Bowers, 50, of the 2800 block of Southview Road has been charged with manslaughter. Mr. Bowers, a divorced father of four who police said had a relationship with Ms. Hodge for about 18 months, is being held at the county Detention Center on $100,000 bond.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1996
Victims' rights groups sharply criticized the 120-day jail term given yesterday by a Howard County judge to a 52-year-old accountant in the 1993 chloroform death of his 20-year-old girlfriend.Melvin Robert Bowers, formerly of Ellicott City, could have received 10 years in prison for his Nov. 8 involuntary manslaughter conviction in the death of Geneva Marie Hodge of Baltimore. She died after Bowers put a chloroform-soaked rag over her nose and mouth and fell asleep, leaving the rag in place.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1996
Victims' rights groups sharply criticized the 120-day jail term given yesterday by a Howard County judge to a 52-year-old accountant in the 1993 chloroform death of his 20-year-old girlfriend.Melvin Robert Bowers, formerly of Ellicott City, could have received 10 years in prison for his Nov. 8 involuntary manslaughter conviction in the death of Geneva Marie Hodge of Baltimore. She died after Bowers put a chloroform-soaked rag over her nose and mouth and fell asleep, leaving the rag in place.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1996
Victims' rights groups sharply criticized the 120-day jail term given yesterday by a Howard County judge to a 52-year-old accountant in the 1993 chloroform death of his 20-year-old girlfriend.Melvin Robert Bowers, formerly of Ellicott City, could have received 10 years in prison for his Nov. 8 involuntary manslaughter conviction in the death of Geneva Marie Hodge of Baltimore. She died after Bowers put a chloroform-soaked rag over her nose and mouth and fell asleep, leaving the rag in place.
NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1996
Victims' rights groups sharply criticized the 120-day jail term given yesterday by a Howard County judge to a 52-year-old accountant in the 1993 chloroform death of his 20-year-old girlfriend.Melvin Robert Bowers, formerly of Ellicott City, could have received 10 years in prison for his Nov. 8 involuntary manslaughter conviction in the death of Geneva Marie Hodge of Baltimore. She died after Bowers put a chloroform-soaked rag over her nose and mouth and fell asleep, leaving the rag in place.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1995
A 52-year-old accountant, described by prosecutors as "reckless and grossly negligent," was convicted yesterday in the 1993 chloroform-inhalation death of his 20-year-old girlfriend.Melvin Robert Bowers was found guilty of involuntary manslaughter for giving Geneva Marie Hodge a deadly dose of chloroform to treat a toothache on Sept. 6, 1993 -- despite defense claims that her death was an accident.Bowers, who lived in Ellicott City at the time of the incident but has since moved to Baltimore, could be sentenced to up to 10 years in prison.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1995
Melvin Robert Bowers went on trial yesterday for a second time on a manslaughter charge in the 1993 chloroform-inhalation death of his 20-year-old girlfriend.A Howard Circuit Court jury could not reach a verdict on a charge of manslaughter at Bowers' trial in August 1994, although he was convicted of a lesser count, reckless endangerment. Prosecutors are making another attempt for a manslaughter conviction."This is a strange, unusual and somewhat bizarre case," Howard County State's Attorney Marna McLendon said in her opening statement.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Sun Staff Writer | March 6, 1995
It's a risky world out there, what with ozone in our air, chlorine in our water, asbestos in our schools and naturally occurring radon gas in our homes. And nobody knows that better than about 4,000 scientists in Baltimore this week for a meeting of the Society of Toxicology.The researchers study those hazards and help test the safety of new drugs, food additives and cosmetics.Government regulators use their studies to decide which chemicals to approve and which to curb or ban -- decisions that can save lives or, if the threat is grossly overestimated, waste billions of dollars.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | October 9, 1994
Howard County prosecutors will retry an Ellicott City accountant on manslaughter charges in the chloroform-inhalation death of his 20-year-old girlfriend in September 1993.Melvin Robert Bowers, 51, was convicted of reckless endangerment at his Circuit Court trial in August, but a jury could not reach a verdict on the more serious manslaughter count.Bowers is accused of giving Geneva Marie Hodge of Baltimore a lethal dosage of chloroform, a toxic substance once used as an anesthetic, to treat a toothache at his home in the 2800 block of Southview Road on Sept.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1995
Melvin Robert Bowers went on trial yesterday for a second time on a manslaughter charge in the 1993 chloroform-inhalation death of his 20-year-old girlfriend.A Howard Circuit Court jury could not reach a verdict on a charge of manslaughter at Bowers' trial in August 1994, although he was convicted of a lesser count, reckless endangerment. Prosecutors are making another attempt for a manslaughter conviction."This is a strange, unusual and somewhat bizarre case," Howard County State's Attorney Marna McLendon said in her opening statement.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Staff Writer | April 21, 1993
Aberdeen Proving Ground said yesterday that its water-treatment plant north of Aberdeen appears to be the source of low levels of chloroform, a suspected carcinogen, in nearby private wells.Army officials said that if the treatment plant is confirmed to be the source, the proving ground may have to supply bottled water or in-home filter systems to at least six homes."We'll find the leak and fix it," said Howard Galliford, an environmental official at the proving ground.Army officials say fixing a leak at the water-treatment plant could require shutting it for a day or more.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | August 25, 1994
A Howard County jury convicted an Ellicott City man yesterday of reckless endangerment in the chloroform-inhalation death of his 20-year-old girlfriend in September.But the jury of seven women and five men deadlocked on a more serious charge of manslaughter and acquitted Bowers of a charge of inhaling harmful substances.The jury deliberated nearly six hours before reaching its verdict against Melvin Robert Bowers, 51, after a three-day trial in Howard Circuit Court.Senior Assistant State's Attorney Joseph Murtha said he will meet with his supervisors and the family of Geneva Marie Hodge, the victim, to determine if Bowers will be tried again on the manslaughter charge.
NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | August 24, 1994
A Howard County jury listened yesterday to a taped police interrogation in which an Ellicott City accountant described how he gave his 20-year-old girlfriend chloroform to treat a toothache one night last September and found her dead the next morning.The tape of the 90-minute interview was played by the prosecution in the Howard Circuit Court trial of 51-year-old Melvin Robert Bowers, who is charged with manslaughter for the Sept. 6 death of Geneva Marie Hodge of Baltimore.To convict Mr. Bowers, the jury of seven women and five men must find that his actions were so negligent that he caused the death of Ms. Hodge.
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