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By Doug Oster and Doug Oster,Tribune Media Services | May 21, 2008
The flavor of garlic is essential for the kitchen, beloved by cooks and gardeners alike. But you don't have to grow garlic to reap its taste fresh from your garden. There's an easy-to-cultivate plant - Chinese chive - that resembles other members of the onion family but offers that mild garlic flavor and doesn't produce a bulb. Chinese chive (Allium tuberosum) has many common names, including garlic chive, Chinese leek and, in Japan, nira. It's been used for centuries in Asian cooking, but can add something different to Western dishes, too. It's flat-leafed and has a beautiful white flower that comes up about a month after the first tender green shoots.
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FEATURES
By Megan Brockett, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2013
Janice O'Donnell watched the number on her screen climb and climb and climb. And when she couldn't watch any more, there were text messages from friends asking if she was watching. By the end of the day, close to $50,000 had poured in through the Chive Charities campaign set up to benefit her 2-year-old-daughter, Addyson, who was born with spina bifida. "I basically spent the entire day crying," O'Donnell said. She had expected maybe a couple thousand dollars, at the most.
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NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | August 3, 2003
Without fail at the end of each of my cooking classes, students raise their hands to ask about dishes that can be made in advance. Everyone, from restaurateurs to caterers to home cooks, loves food that can be completely prepared ahead with no last-minute kitchen angst. I certainly am among the legions who appreciate such recipes, especially when entertaining. And, of all the seasons of the year, summer lends itself best to make-ahead creations. Artichokes with a potato, bacon and chive filling, a recent addition to my repertoire, definitely fall into this category.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Kickler Kelber, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
You could, in a pinch, pick up a tub of generic onion dip from the refrigerated section at your local store before your next football gathering. Or, terrifyingly enough, even off the shelf in the chip aisle. But then you'd be missing out on this melty, rich, carmelized onion wonderfulness. Plus: bacon. Yes, this takes more time - especially carmelizing those onions, which always seems to take way longer than even the most truthful-sounding recipes claim. Wait it out until you get that telltale golden brown.
FEATURES
By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens Magazine | August 28, 1991
Thanks to your microwave oven, you can make trying new vegetables, such as kohlrabi, quicker and easier than ever. This sweet and lemony side dish is ready for sampling in less than 10 minutes.In case you're wondering, kohlrabi is a round vegetable that tastes like a cross between a cabbage and a turnip. How do you prepare it? Cut off the top, then use a sharp knife to pull off the strips of woody peel.To cut kohlrabi into strips, first slice it crosswise into one-quarter-inch-thick slices, then cut the slices lengthwise.
NEWS
By Kristin Eddy and Kristin Eddy,Special to the Sun | March 17, 2002
Many people fondly remember quick childhood dinners of fish sticks and fried potatoes. With all due respect to the past, here's an adult meal of homemade fish cakes that will surely satisfy (and can be fashioned into fingers if you insist). Steam the side dishes of potatoes and broccoli to offset the crispy calories of the fish, and finish with a soft molasses cookie for comfort. MENU Fish Cakes With Chives and tartar sauce Steamed redskin potatoes Steamed broccoli Iced molasses cookies Lemon iced tea TIME-SAVING TIPS * Frozen, thawed fish is a fine substitute for fresh in this recipe.
NEWS
January 9, 2000
Baking potatoes? Try these: For a creamy dairy-free topping, blend 4 ounces soft tofu with 2 to 3 teaspoons lemon juice until very smooth. Stir in chopped herbs, if desired. For a savory fat-free seasoning, sprinkle vegetable broth granules onto a hot baked potato and mix in lightly. Herbs that complement potatoes include chives, oregano, paprika, parsley, rosemary and thyme. Cole's Cooking A to Z
NEWS
By Renee Enna and Renee Enna,Chicago Tribune | February 21, 2007
Those bags of prepacked greens aren't just for salads. Some lend themselves to form the base of nutritious and delicious dressings for salads and sandwiches. Here, we're combining baby arugula and using its peppery flavor with the oniony tang of chives and orange juice. The beauty of these bold ingredients is that you can substitute low-fat mayonnaise for the full-fat variety and not miss a beat of flavor. Because we squeezed a fresh navel orange to supply our juice quotient, we decided to use the rest of the fruit as a garnish.
NEWS
By Bev Bennett and By Bev Bennett,Special to the Sun | May 12, 2002
Food scientists who haven't been stunted by fat phobia make a good case for using a little in cooking. "Fat, although unappetizing by itself, makes food taste better. Fats coat the mouth and hold flavors for complete and rounded tastes," writes Shirley O. Corriher, a biochemist, cooking instructor and author of CookWise (William Morrow and Co., 1997). When you're cooking low-fat foods, it's tempting to eliminate any additional fat. Why ruin a low-calorie entree such as fish or chicken breast with fat?
FEATURES
By Maria Hiaasen | July 23, 1997
* ITEM: INLAND VALLEY MUNCHSKIN MEALS* WHAT YOU GET: 20 ounces, or 10 potato skins* COST: $4.59* TIME TO PREPARE: 15 minutes in conventional oven or 4 minutes in the microwave* REVIEW: Munchskin Meals tastes just like a restaurant order of loaded potato skins but costs a couple of bucks less. Not sold yet? These spuds tasted equally good from conventional oven or microwave, and the kit includes ample amounts of cheese, bacon and sour cream with chives. Junk food junkies, go directly to your grocer's frozen food section for a hit.Pub Date: 7/23/97
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2010
Joan Shaw from Fayetteville, N.C., was trying to find a recipe for making cucumber salad dressing. She was particularly fond of one served at the Baldino's restaurant chain. I was not able to locate the Baldino's recipe, but I did receive a recipe for a creamy cucumber dressing from Jennifer Simms of Santa Rosa, Calif. Simms says she can't recall where she originally got this recipe but that she has been making it for several years and everyone seems to enjoy it. She says it works equally well as a salad dressing or dip and that it is wonderful with raw vegetables.
NEWS
By Julie Rothman and Julie Rothman,Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2009
While visiting Baltimore in 2003, Patti Kress from Osprey Fla., had an incredibly good cheese spread that she purchased at a cheese stand at the Cross Street Market. She thinks it contained asiago cheese, cream cheese and chives. Since she doesn't get to Baltimore often, she was hoping to find a recipe for the spread so she could re-create it at home. Tracy Morgan from Santa Rosa, Calif., says she came up with a delicious cheese spread that sounds very close to what Kress described. The spread is very simple to make and reminded me of a homemade Boursin cheese.
NEWS
By Doug Oster and Doug Oster,Tribune Media Services | May 21, 2008
The flavor of garlic is essential for the kitchen, beloved by cooks and gardeners alike. But you don't have to grow garlic to reap its taste fresh from your garden. There's an easy-to-cultivate plant - Chinese chive - that resembles other members of the onion family but offers that mild garlic flavor and doesn't produce a bulb. Chinese chive (Allium tuberosum) has many common names, including garlic chive, Chinese leek and, in Japan, nira. It's been used for centuries in Asian cooking, but can add something different to Western dishes, too. It's flat-leafed and has a beautiful white flower that comes up about a month after the first tender green shoots.
FEATURES
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Tribune Media Services | April 26, 2008
When entertaining in April, I serve dishes like Creamy White Turnip Soup with Toasted Breadcrumbs and Chives. This satisfying potage is made with small white turnips (which are harbingers of spring) that are sweeter and milder than the stronger yellow winter ones known as rutabagas. These white turnips tinged with purple are peeled and diced, then sauteed along with chopped leeks in butter. This vegetable duo is simmered in chicken stock until tender; then the mixture is pureed and enriched with milk.
NEWS
By Jill Wendholt Silva and Jill Wendholt Silva,McClatchy-Tribune | April 2, 2008
Usually reserved for restaurant dining, scallops are an elegant entree. This recipe for Pan-Seared Scallops With Ginger Sauce is a dish fit for company, yet easy to prepare. About the size of a marshmallow, the bivalve has a mildly sweet, slightly nutty flavor that even those who do not typically like fish usually enjoy. And like fish, scallops are good for your heart. The American Heart Association recommends eating at least two fish meals per week. Scallops are a good source of omega-3 fatty acids, but an even better source of vitamin B-12, which helps the body convert homocysteine, a chemical that attacks the blood vessel walls, into a benign substance.
NEWS
By Sumathi Reddy and Sumathi Reddy,Sun reporter | May 2, 2007
Recipe of the Week: Kabobs 52 Easy Recipes for Year-Round Grilling Lobel's Prime Time Grilling Recipes & Tips From America's #1 Butchers By Stanley, Leon, Evan, Mark and David Lobel Wiley / 2007 / $27.95 I've never been to the Lobels' famous Madison Avenue butcher shop, frequented by Manhattan's finest socialites and celebrities. But man, oh man, do I want to go now. The second edition of their cookbook includes 160 recipes, ranging from brisket, ribs, duck and pheasant to the perfect-sounding burgers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Kickler Kelber, The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2012
You could, in a pinch, pick up a tub of generic onion dip from the refrigerated section at your local store before your next football gathering. Or, terrifyingly enough, even off the shelf in the chip aisle. But then you'd be missing out on this melty, rich, carmelized onion wonderfulness. Plus: bacon. Yes, this takes more time - especially carmelizing those onions, which always seems to take way longer than even the most truthful-sounding recipes claim. Wait it out until you get that telltale golden brown.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman, Special to The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2010
Joan Shaw from Fayetteville, N.C., was trying to find a recipe for making cucumber salad dressing. She was particularly fond of one served at the Baldino's restaurant chain. I was not able to locate the Baldino's recipe, but I did receive a recipe for a creamy cucumber dressing from Jennifer Simms of Santa Rosa, Calif. Simms says she can't recall where she originally got this recipe but that she has been making it for several years and everyone seems to enjoy it. She says it works equally well as a salad dressing or dip and that it is wonderful with raw vegetables.
NEWS
By Renee Enna and Renee Enna,Chicago Tribune | February 21, 2007
Those bags of prepacked greens aren't just for salads. Some lend themselves to form the base of nutritious and delicious dressings for salads and sandwiches. Here, we're combining baby arugula and using its peppery flavor with the oniony tang of chives and orange juice. The beauty of these bold ingredients is that you can substitute low-fat mayonnaise for the full-fat variety and not miss a beat of flavor. Because we squeezed a fresh navel orange to supply our juice quotient, we decided to use the rest of the fruit as a garnish.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | October 1, 2006
Food: 3 1/2 stars Service: 3 stars Atmosphere: 3 stars If you've had your fill of small plates, spa cuisine and offbeat fusion dishes, your next meal out should be at Cynthia's in Severna Park. There chef/owner Brian Bennington and his talented pastry chef -- co-owner and wife Cindy Bennington -- are proving there is still room for grandeur in the kitchen. Nothing against Ledo's Pizza, the Dress Barn, and the many other tenants of the Park Plaza shopping center; but this enjoyable restaurant deserves to be somewhere a little more elegant.
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