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By Jonathan Peterson and Denise Gellene and Jonathan Peterson and Denise Gellene,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 18, 2004
WASHINGTON - A Food and Drug Administration report made public yesterday shows that bacterial contamination at Chiron Corp.'s flu vaccine plant in England is more widespread than previously thought, raising doubts about the company's ability to deliver flu shots in 2005. Also yesterday, the FDA disclosed during a congressional hearing into the vaccine shortage that the results of an inspection of the plant in June 2003, which found evidence of contamination and faulty sterilization procedures, were not shared with the company until a year later, when it would have been too late to make changes to salvage this year's batch of 50 million shots.
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NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 1, 2005
WASHINGTON - As part of an effort to rebuild the country's limited supply of flu vaccine, federal drug regulators announced the fast-track approval of a new vaccine yesterday. Stocks dipped below necessary levels last year after regulators found contamination at the British plant of a major manufacturer. Food and Drug Administration officials, in approving Fluarix, an influenza vaccine for adults, said yesterday that the decision would be a significant boost toward ensuring an ample supply of vaccine.
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NEWS
By Denise Gellene and Emma Schwartz and Denise Gellene and Emma Schwartz,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 9, 2004
WASHINGTON - The acting commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration said yesterday he was "pessimistic" that any flu vaccine made by Chiron Corp. can be cleared for use this season. Dr. Lester M. Crawford made his comments at a congressional hearing in Washington as a team of FDA officials prepared to inspect Chiron's flu vaccine factory in Liverpool, England, today and tomorrow. British drug industry regulators on Tuesday shutdown the Chiron factory for three months, citing manufacturing problems that could lead to bacterial contamination of vaccine.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | June 16, 2005
The company whose contaminated plant touched off last year's flu vaccine shortage said yesterday that it won't be able to make all the doses promised for the 2005-2006 influenza season, raising the possibility of another vaccine shortage this fall. California-based Chiron Corp. blamed manufacturing problems for its inability to produce its promised U.S. supply of 25 million to 30 million flu vaccine doses. Chiron said it will be able to make 18 million to 26 million shots this year. A spokesman for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta said yesterday that it's possible U.S. health officials will have to prioritize during the coming flu season by providing flu shots first to high-risk populations such as the elderly and the seriously ill. Last fall, the United States unexpectedly lost half its flu vaccine - about 48 million doses - after British officials closed Chiron's Liverpool, England, Fluviron plant because of contamination problems.
NEWS
By NEWSDAY | June 16, 2005
The company whose contaminated plant touched off last year's flu vaccine shortage said yesterday that it won't be able to make all the doses promised for the 2005-2006 influenza season, raising the possibility of another vaccine shortage this fall. California-based Chiron Corp. blamed manufacturing problems for its inability to produce its promised U.S. supply of 25 million to 30 million flu vaccine doses. Chiron said it will be able to make 18 million to 26 million shots this year. A spokesman for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta said yesterday that it's possible U.S. health officials will have to prioritize during the coming flu season by providing flu shots first to high-risk populations such as the elderly and the seriously ill. Last fall, the United States unexpectedly lost half its flu vaccine - about 48 million doses - after British officials closed Chiron's Liverpool, England, Fluviron plant because of contamination problems.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1995
American called best airlineAmerican Airlines has overtaken Southwest Airlines to become the nation's best major airline, a survey said yesterday.The 1995 Airline Quality Rating, compiled by researchers at Wichita State University and the University of Nebraska, is based on a host of factors including safety, on-time performance, age of fleet and traveler complaints.Dallas-based American, the nation's largest carrier, also had been rated the best for three years before Southwest pushed it aside last year.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2004
After an "exhaustive" inspection of the plant where it was produced, the head of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration declared yesterday that none of the flu vaccine made by Chiron Corp. is safe for use in the United States. Lester M. Crawford said that all of the Chiron-produced doses - up to 48 million originally destined for the U.S. market - are considered "suspect" after random testing found contamination in batches that the company had insisted were pure. The acting FDA commissioner did not say how many of the 100 inspected batches were found to be tainted.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 1, 2005
WASHINGTON - As part of an effort to rebuild the country's limited supply of flu vaccine, federal drug regulators announced the fast-track approval of a new vaccine yesterday. Stocks dipped below necessary levels last year after regulators found contamination at the British plant of a major manufacturer. Food and Drug Administration officials, in approving Fluarix, an influenza vaccine for adults, said yesterday that the decision would be a significant boost toward ensuring an ample supply of vaccine.
NEWS
By Jonathan Peterson and Jonathan Peterson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 10, 2004
WASHINGTON - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has delivered to Congress an array of materials on its oversight of a troubled flu-vaccine factory, as investigators assess how the FDA did its job of protecting the public. The Oct. 5 shutdown of Chiron Corp.'s plant in Liverpool, England, by British health authorities halved the expected supply of vaccine to the United States, forcing a hurried reorganization of U.S. immunization plans for the flu season. Yesterday, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that only 11 million vaccine doses remained out of a total supply of about 61 million and that it was working closely with local health officials to get the shots to those with the greatest need, including senior citizens and other vulnerable people.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | March 23, 1993
Rebound still awaited for biotech stocksThat rebound in biotechnology stocks that some forecasters predicted last week never materialized -- even after positive news from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for Chiron Corp.Late last week, an FDA advisory panel recommended the agency approve a drug that slows the frequent attacks of certain types of multiple sclerosis. The recommendation wasn't unanimous, but a majority of the panel did find it would be useful to as many as 200,000 patients, according to the company.
BUSINESS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | January 7, 2005
Though flu season is not over, a report by one Wall Street analyst suggests sales of FluMist, the nasal spray flu vaccine made by Gaithersburg-based MedImmune Inc., will again be dismal this year. Survey results released this week by the New York investment house Lazard Freres & Co. estimate that about 1 million doses of FluMist have been sold by doctors and pharmacies this season. That is a third of the 3 million doses produced at the urging of public health officials. The officials feared a flu epidemic after flu vaccine-producer Chiron Corp.
NEWS
By Jonathan Peterson and Denise Gellene and Jonathan Peterson and Denise Gellene,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 18, 2004
WASHINGTON - A Food and Drug Administration report made public yesterday shows that bacterial contamination at Chiron Corp.'s flu vaccine plant in England is more widespread than previously thought, raising doubts about the company's ability to deliver flu shots in 2005. Also yesterday, the FDA disclosed during a congressional hearing into the vaccine shortage that the results of an inspection of the plant in June 2003, which found evidence of contamination and faulty sterilization procedures, were not shared with the company until a year later, when it would have been too late to make changes to salvage this year's batch of 50 million shots.
NEWS
By Jonathan Peterson and Jonathan Peterson,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 10, 2004
WASHINGTON - The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has delivered to Congress an array of materials on its oversight of a troubled flu-vaccine factory, as investigators assess how the FDA did its job of protecting the public. The Oct. 5 shutdown of Chiron Corp.'s plant in Liverpool, England, by British health authorities halved the expected supply of vaccine to the United States, forcing a hurried reorganization of U.S. immunization plans for the flu season. Yesterday, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that only 11 million vaccine doses remained out of a total supply of about 61 million and that it was working closely with local health officials to get the shots to those with the greatest need, including senior citizens and other vulnerable people.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2004
After an "exhaustive" inspection of the plant where it was produced, the head of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration declared yesterday that none of the flu vaccine made by Chiron Corp. is safe for use in the United States. Lester M. Crawford said that all of the Chiron-produced doses - up to 48 million originally destined for the U.S. market - are considered "suspect" after random testing found contamination in batches that the company had insisted were pure. The acting FDA commissioner did not say how many of the 100 inspected batches were found to be tainted.
NEWS
By Denise Gellene and Emma Schwartz and Denise Gellene and Emma Schwartz,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 9, 2004
WASHINGTON - The acting commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration said yesterday he was "pessimistic" that any flu vaccine made by Chiron Corp. can be cleared for use this season. Dr. Lester M. Crawford made his comments at a congressional hearing in Washington as a team of FDA officials prepared to inspect Chiron's flu vaccine factory in Liverpool, England, today and tomorrow. British drug industry regulators on Tuesday shutdown the Chiron factory for three months, citing manufacturing problems that could lead to bacterial contamination of vaccine.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2004
With a full order of 7,000 doses of influenza vaccine on hand, Carroll County's health officer plans to begin holding flu-shot clinics tomorrow, but he is now asking that only residents in specific high-risk categories participate. In a conference call late yesterday, state and municipal health officials revealed that some Maryland counties have no vaccine, said Larry L. Leitch, Carroll's health officer. Leitch said that his action was voluntary, but that a statewide redistribution could be ordered by the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2004
With a full order of 7,000 doses of influenza vaccine on hand, Carroll County's health officer plans to begin holding flu-shot clinics tomorrow, but he is now asking that only residents in specific high-risk categories participate. In a conference call late yesterday, state and municipal health officials revealed that some Maryland counties have no vaccine, said Larry L. Leitch, Carroll's health officer. Leitch said that his action was voluntary, but that a statewide redistribution could be ordered by the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2004
With a full order of 7,000 doses of influenza vaccine on hand, Carroll County's health officer plans to begin holding flu-shot clinics tomorrow, but he is now asking that only residents in specific high-risk categories participate. In a conference call late yesterday, state and municipal health officials revealed that some Maryland counties have no vaccine, said Larry L. Leitch, Carroll's health officer. Leitch said that his action was voluntary, but that a statewide redistribution could be ordered by the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2004
With a full order of 7,000 doses of influenza vaccine on hand, Carroll County's health officer plans to begin holding flu-shot clinics tomorrow, but he is now asking that only residents in specific high-risk categories participate. In a conference call late yesterday, state and municipal health officials revealed that some Maryland counties have no vaccine, said Larry L. Leitch, Carroll's health officer. Leitch said that his action was voluntary, but that a statewide redistribution could be ordered by the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | October 7, 2004
With a full order of 7,000 doses of influenza vaccine on hand, Carroll County's health officer plans to begin holding flu-shot clinics tomorrow, but he is now asking that only residents in specific high-risk categories participate. In a telephone conference call late yesterday, state and municipal health officials revealed that some Maryland counties have no vaccine, said Larry L. Leitch, Carroll's health officer. Leitch said that his action was voluntary, but that a statewide redistribution could be ordered by the state Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.
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