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By New York Times News Service | July 8, 1992
Call it the great banana war of 1992. It broke out when the European market did not open as expected, saddling the big growers, newly expanded for the cause, with surpluses.Prices in Europe -- and to a lesser degree in the United States -- dropped along with the profits of the big brand companies like Del Monte, Dole and Chiquita. Investors have stampeded out of fruit stocks.As the world's biggest banana marketer and the only one of the Big Three that relies on bananas for its fortunes, Chiquita Brands International has been kicked hardest.
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BUSINESS
February 9, 2008
Chiquita Brands International Inc. Shares gained 44 cents, closing at $17.08. The produce distributor is poised to gain from a World Trade Organization ruling against the European Union's import tariffs for bananas.
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BUSINESS
By KNIGH RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 2, 2006
MIAMI -- Pat Foster doesn't growbanana plants. He doesn't pick bananas. But he's responsible for whether the bananas you buy at the grocery store are an appetizing canary yellow or an unsavory lime green. Foster's official title is Chiquita's director of ripening, but think of him as the Banana Gas Man. At his warehouse in Port Everglades, Fla., he puts the finishing touches on green bananas, jump-starting the ripening process by exposing them to ethylene gas in a careful balance of temperature, time and dosage.
BUSINESS
By KNIGH RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 2, 2006
MIAMI -- Pat Foster doesn't growbanana plants. He doesn't pick bananas. But he's responsible for whether the bananas you buy at the grocery store are an appetizing canary yellow or an unsavory lime green. Foster's official title is Chiquita's director of ripening, but think of him as the Banana Gas Man. At his warehouse in Port Everglades, Fla., he puts the finishing touches on green bananas, jump-starting the ripening process by exposing them to ethylene gas in a careful balance of temperature, time and dosage.
BUSINESS
February 9, 2008
Chiquita Brands International Inc. Shares gained 44 cents, closing at $17.08. The produce distributor is poised to gain from a World Trade Organization ruling against the European Union's import tariffs for bananas.
NEWS
April 14, 2001
THE BUSH administration notched its first foreign policy success this week, which had nothing to do with China. It was the European Union's agreement to phase out quota preferences on banana imports. President Bush's trade representative, Robert Zoellick, reached the deal that had eluded the Clinton administration. It ended a nine-year struggle that included U.S. retaliatory trade sanctions on European luxury imports, authorized by the World Trade Organization. The European Union in 1993 slapped on quotas largely kicking South and Central American product out of that vast market in favor of bananas from former European colonies in the Caribbean, Africa and the South Pacific.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2002
Chiquita to emerge from Chapter 11 as a company 95 percent-owned by its creditors. [Page 18c] Maryland House panel would restrict CareFirst sale to all-cash deal. [Page18c] Wall Street extends rally on good news about employment. [Page12c] Amex15c..........Nasdaq13c Dividends10c.........NYSE11c Foreign10c............Options10c Futures10c...........Sun Stocks18c
BUSINESS
July 8, 1992
* Trepidation over the prospect of weak corporate profits sends the Dow Jones average of 30 industrials skidding to 3,295.17. (Details on 6B)* Chiquita suffers most as banana prices fall. A poor crop and competition for Europe are among the culprits being blamed as investors stampede out of fruit stocks. (Details on 10B)* Silver prices plunge as a chain reaction apparently set off by an indictment in the BCCI scandal leads a Middle Eastern holder to sell off an estimated 5 million to 7 million ounces.
SPORTS
By Gary Davidson and Gary Davidson,Contributing Writer | July 26, 1994
The U.S. national women's soccer team is turning its attention to the 1995 world championships.The 1991 titlists are motivated, but not by potential financial rewards. There are none, except for five players who have signed outside promotional deals."The reason we're playing is we love to play and we love to win," said midfielder Kristine Lilly, one of nine 1991 veterans on the squad. "It's personal, and I don't think many people understand it."None of the 22 women training at Howard High School in Columbia for the Chiquita Cup and CONCACAF (confederation of the Americas)
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1998
CINCINNATI -- The apology caught everyone by surprise.Two months earlier the Cincinnati Enquirers 18-page & 2/3 investigation of Chiquita Brands International Inc. seemed destined for Pulitzer Prize consideration. Now, there was a carefully worded apology and an accompanying article without a byline on the newspaper's Sunday, June 28 front page.The city's major daily was renouncing its own series, saying it was "convinced that the above representations, accusations and conclusions are untrue and created a false and misleading impression of Chiquita's business practices."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Roy Rivenburg and Roy Rivenburg,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 22, 2004
In what could be the weirdest election since California's recall race, a hyperactive bunny, a steroid-pumped clean freak, a giggling blob of dough and 23 other product mascots are campaigning to become America's favorite advertising icon. The battle of the mascots began earlier this month in New York City. After posing for TV news crews and listening to former Mayor Ed Koch give pointers on how to kiss babies and shake hands, a herd of mascots - including Tony the Tiger, Charlie the Tuna, Kool-Aid Man and the Pillsbury Doughboy - invaded the streets to hustle votes.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2004
Baltimore police arrested yesterday two men wanted on warrants - one of whom had escaped from prison weeks earlier - after storming an apartment in Ednor Gardens where the men had barricaded themselves. Police received an anonymous tip yesterday that Miguel Diggs, 23, who had escaped from the state Division of Correction's Central Laundry Facility in Sykesville on March 29, was in the apartment in the 800 block of Nat Court. Since his escape, Diggs has been implicated in three armed robberies and one nonfatal shooting, said Detective Donny Moses.
BUSINESS
March 9, 2002
Chiquita to emerge from Chapter 11 as a company 95 percent-owned by its creditors. [Page 18c] Maryland House panel would restrict CareFirst sale to all-cash deal. [Page18c] Wall Street extends rally on good news about employment. [Page12c] Amex15c..........Nasdaq13c Dividends10c.........NYSE11c Foreign10c............Options10c Futures10c...........Sun Stocks18c
NEWS
April 14, 2001
THE BUSH administration notched its first foreign policy success this week, which had nothing to do with China. It was the European Union's agreement to phase out quota preferences on banana imports. President Bush's trade representative, Robert Zoellick, reached the deal that had eluded the Clinton administration. It ended a nine-year struggle that included U.S. retaliatory trade sanctions on European luxury imports, authorized by the World Trade Organization. The European Union in 1993 slapped on quotas largely kicking South and Central American product out of that vast market in favor of bananas from former European colonies in the Caribbean, Africa and the South Pacific.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | August 5, 1998
CINCINNATI -- The apology caught everyone by surprise.Two months earlier the Cincinnati Enquirers 18-page & 2/3 investigation of Chiquita Brands International Inc. seemed destined for Pulitzer Prize consideration. Now, there was a carefully worded apology and an accompanying article without a byline on the newspaper's Sunday, June 28 front page.The city's major daily was renouncing its own series, saying it was "convinced that the above representations, accusations and conclusions are untrue and created a false and misleading impression of Chiquita's business practices."
NEWS
By Reese Cleghorn | July 23, 1998
A SPATE of misdeeds in journalism has fed speculation that things are worse than ever, much-revered standards have gone out the window and a lot of journalism is pure fabrication.Time out, please. A lot is going on here. In my judgment, most news organizations are more careful than ever to assure the integrity of their work. But there is more reporting, there are more outlets and there are more pressures. And there are more breakdowns.The most recent failures may not have much of a pattern, except that they were exposed.
NEWS
By Reese Cleghorn | July 23, 1998
A SPATE of misdeeds in journalism has fed speculation that things are worse than ever, much-revered standards have gone out the window and a lot of journalism is pure fabrication.Time out, please. A lot is going on here. In my judgment, most news organizations are more careful than ever to assure the integrity of their work. But there is more reporting, there are more outlets and there are more pressures. And there are more breakdowns.The most recent failures may not have much of a pattern, except that they were exposed.
FEATURES
By Michael Klein and Michael Klein,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 9, 1992
Tracy Pikhart Ritter has looked at cooking from both sides now.She has whisked up velvety beurre blanc sauces and baked rich eclairs, oozing cholesterol. She also has whipped up oat bran- and almond-crusted chicken roulade with spaghetti squash, carrots and julienned wild mushrooms, bursting with healthfulness.Ms. Ritter trained at the French Culinary Institute in New York, and after working as chef for 12 years in fine New York restaurants, wound up as executive chef at the most low-caloried of places: the Golden Door Spa in San Marcos, Calif.
NEWS
By Wendell Cochran | July 19, 1998
For the past several years, my journalism ethics course has included a session called "Lying, Cheating, Stealing: Journalists on the Job."The title was purposely hyperbolic, designed to provoke discussion about news gathering practices. Unfortunately, according to recent headlines, it might be an all-too-accurate description of how some reporters and editors practice their craft.There's Stephen Glass, at the New Republic making up people and scenes out of whole cloth, and doing it quite well.
NEWS
By George Langford | July 17, 1998
CHICAGO -- There is a consensus in the news business that the journalism profession has had better days.Journalists have been accused in the last two months of lying, stealing, racing into print with inadequately sourced stories and abusing the anonymous-sources crutch. Four have been fired, two resigned, one was reprimanded and a handful have either offered to quit or should. Damage assessments and theories about what caused these recent messes vary wildly.Embarrassment abounds in an industry that for most of this decade has favored hand wringing, hair shirts, New Age consultants, focus groups and intense navel gazing to help it understand its slipping popularity and credibility.
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