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Chip Silverman

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BUSINESS
By David Conn | October 29, 1990
Back in 1975, when he was working toward a master's degree in public health administration at Johns Hopkins University, Howard "Chip" Silverman wrote a thesis on "The Function of the Bureaucracy on the Treatment of Drug Abuse.""It was a piece that showed the frustration, the cynicism and the folly of some of the ways that the bureaucracy was treating what's become the No. 1 public health crisis in this country," says the 48-year-old Baltimore native, who worked for the last 20 years in the state bureaucracy.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporters | March 8, 2008
Howard "Chip" Silverman, one of the original "diner guys" who chronicled life and coming of age in 1950s and 1960s Northwest Baltimore and later became director of the state Alcohol and Drug Abuse Administration, died Thursday evening of melanoma at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 65. Dr. Silverman, an addictions clinician and behavioral health consultant, had lived at Harper House condominiums in Cross Keys since 2003. From 1970 to 1975, he coached Morgan State's lacrosse team, which gained national recognition during his tenure.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporters | March 8, 2008
Howard "Chip" Silverman, one of the original "diner guys" who chronicled life and coming of age in 1950s and 1960s Northwest Baltimore and later became director of the state Alcohol and Drug Abuse Administration, died Thursday evening of melanoma at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. He was 65. Dr. Silverman, an addictions clinician and behavioral health consultant, had lived at Harper House condominiums in Cross Keys since 2003. From 1970 to 1975, he coached Morgan State's lacrosse team, which gained national recognition during his tenure.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | March 1, 2008
Even as he lies on a hospice bed with cancer, Chip Silverman perks up when he hears his fiancee, Gail Wolven, answer questions about his days as Morgan State's lacrosse coach. Silverman, 65, has been flooded with visits, phone calls and text messages from former players since he was diagnosed with stage IV melanoma Oct. 5. The cancer has spread through his body, but Silverman is strong in spirit. He speaks barely above a whisper. "The turnout has been great," Silverman said of the players' response.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | March 1, 2008
Even as he lies on a hospice bed with cancer, Chip Silverman perks up when he hears his fiancee, Gail Wolven, answer questions about his days as Morgan State's lacrosse coach. Silverman, 65, has been flooded with visits, phone calls and text messages from former players since he was diagnosed with stage IV melanoma Oct. 5. The cancer has spread through his body, but Silverman is strong in spirit. He speaks barely above a whisper. "The turnout has been great," Silverman said of the players' response.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 11, 2005
Baltimorean Howard "Chip" Silverman considers himself the "keeper of a legacy" - a tangible one located in Village of Cross Keys in North Baltimore. It is here, in his 1,300-square-foot residence in the high-rise Harper House condominiums, that he keeps an urban memory alive for himself and a very special group of friends. "You are about to enter the `Disco Condo,'" he remarked, turning the key deliberately in the lock. After the neutral decor of the unusually quiet 12th-floor hallway, the sights and sounds beyond the front door are a show-stopper.
NEWS
By Katy O'Donnell and Katy O'Donnell,Sun reporter | November 4, 2007
Moving from a suburban bookstore to a swanky ballroom, this year's Book Bash will feature nearly 50 authors, including historians, actors and writers of children's books. After more than 600 people attended last year at the Greetings and Readings in Hunt Valley, organizers moved tonight's event downtown to the Tremont Grand. This year, a bigger space, a jazz band and flutist, caterers and presentations by authors Chip Silverman and Michael Tucker (of L.A. Law fame) may mean an even larger turnout, said Caryn Sagal, the event's publicity chair.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2000
County State's Attorney Frank R. Weathersbee will lead a discussion tonight about the legal and medical consequences of drug and alcohol use at a community forum at South River High School in Edgewater. Also scheduled to speak during the "Drugs, The Law and You" program are addiction-treatment expert Howard "Chip" Silverman and county police Officer Greg Speed. "We were trying to put together a forum that would be informative for both parents and students," said Kathleen E. Evans, an assistant state's attorney and mother of five -- including a 15-year-old daughter who attends South River High.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | December 30, 2006
Leonard "Boogie" Weinglass, 65, is ready to serve Bill and Hillary Clinton the next time they want a meal at the Aspen, Colo., diner he owns. The former Merry-Go-Round retail empire honcho -- who was a character in the 1982 Barry Levinson film Diner -- presides over a stylish food and retail business known as Boogie's Diner. It's a must stop for Aspen's numerous celebrity visitors -- and the Clintons have been there several times. His staff serves about 1,000 patrons daily at the 1950s-style restaurant renowned for hot turkey sandwiches and milkshakes at his up-market shoe and denim departments.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | November 14, 1999
Rebekah Johnson, the young star of "Liberty Heights," munched brownies brought to her from the dessert table by a local doctor. "He said he'd heard actresses don't eat much, and he wanted to make sure I did!" Johnson was heard telling co-star Ben Foster, just before the two were swept up in a sea of new fans at the movie's premiere party.The buzz in the tent behind the Senator Theatre was "bravo!" for Baltimore-born director Barry Levinson's fourth B'more-based film. Its premiere here raised $80,000 for the Osler Scholar Program at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and the Jewish Museum of Maryland.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 11, 2005
Baltimorean Howard "Chip" Silverman considers himself the "keeper of a legacy" - a tangible one located in Village of Cross Keys in North Baltimore. It is here, in his 1,300-square-foot residence in the high-rise Harper House condominiums, that he keeps an urban memory alive for himself and a very special group of friends. "You are about to enter the `Disco Condo,'" he remarked, turning the key deliberately in the lock. After the neutral decor of the unusually quiet 12th-floor hallway, the sights and sounds beyond the front door are a show-stopper.
BUSINESS
By David Conn | October 29, 1990
Back in 1975, when he was working toward a master's degree in public health administration at Johns Hopkins University, Howard "Chip" Silverman wrote a thesis on "The Function of the Bureaucracy on the Treatment of Drug Abuse.""It was a piece that showed the frustration, the cynicism and the folly of some of the ways that the bureaucracy was treating what's become the No. 1 public health crisis in this country," says the 48-year-old Baltimore native, who worked for the last 20 years in the state bureaucracy.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | June 25, 1995
Diner guys, made famous in Barry Levinson's "Diner," came from all over the country to attend summer camp last weekend at the Woods resort in Hedgesville, W. Va. The annual sports-camp idea was the brainchild of diner guy Danny Snyder, president of Corporate Sports Battle, which airs on ESPN. The first event was held five years ago in Oxford, Pa. It moved to Western Maryland College for a few years. Then the 50-something campers got smart and decided that comfort was becoming more of a necessity after strenuous physical activity, so the location was upgraded.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | January 27, 2002
It was all there again at "Heartfest 2002," the annual fund-raiser for the Johns Hopkins Ciccarone Preventive Cardiology Center. First, there were all those heart-healthy dishes, from more than 30 local chefs, to sample. Entertainment came again courtesy Stevie V. and the Heart Attackers, a band made up of local heart doctors and health professionals who perform in scrubs. Then, you had the celebrity honoree, this year original Supremes member Mary Wilson. And then there was what has become Mother Nature's annual contribution to the party -- snow.
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