Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChinese
IN THE NEWS

Chinese

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | June 20, 1993
BEIJING -- The highest-flying economy in the world is searching for a soft landing.But in urban apartments, far-flung villages and the upper echelons of the Chinese Communist Party, fears are mounting that China's rapid economic expansion of the past year could descend into another bout of social and political chaos."
Advertisement
NEWS
By Seth Faison and Seth Faison,New York Times News Service **TC | September 5, 1993
NEW YORK -- Lin Ping's long journey to America seemed to be over at dawn one Sunday in June, when he set foot on a beach in Queens County, a borough of New York City, after a frantic, freezing swim ashore from the Golden Venture, the aging freighter that ran aground off the Rockaway Peninsula after a trip halfway around the world.Even after being taken into custody, Mr. Lin says, he was thrilled to learn that his case would be heard in a court of law. He knew that thousands of Chinese before him had won the right to stay in the United States by saying they had been persecuted for violating China's strict one-child policy, and by saying that they faced fines or sentences in labor camps if they returned.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,Sun Staff Writer | July 26, 1994
A Chinese teen-ager yesterday described how he was smuggled by boat into the United States and held with several dozen other illegal immigrants in a Prince George's County home, where he said armed captors beat them and tried to extort money from their families.The testimony of Xue Tao Chen provided the first public comments from any of the Chinese immigrants discovered April 5, when federal agents raided a three-bedroom home in Mitchellville. The agents found 63 people, most of them illegal aliens being held in the basement, according to court records.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | November 14, 1990
BEIJING -- State-run TV news served up as its lead item last night a scene long awaited by China's hard-line leaders: Premier Li Peng warmly greeting a delegation of American politicians.The five U.S. congressmen, led by Representative Michael G. Oxley, R-Ohio, represented the first delegation of U.S. lawmakers to meet with top-level Chinese leaders since China's brutal crackdown on pro-democracy demonstrators here in June of last year.The congressmen said here this morning that, in their more than one-hour-long meeting with the Chinese premier yesterday, they delivered a strong message linking U.S. concerns over human rights violations in China to the outcome of the U.S. Congress' continuing debate over renewal of China's favorable-trade status with the United States.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch | November 4, 1991
Every summer, hundreds of farm families from across northern China begin appearing at regional pediatric wards, bringing children so sick that they can't walk, can't swallow and can't even breathe.In provincial hospitals, lines form quickly for available respirators.While parents wait for a free machine, they must spend 24 hours a day, seven days a week by their children's beds, pumping on a bag-shaped device that keeps them alive by forcing air into their lungs.Since this annual polio-like epidemic began about 20 years ago, physicians in China and abroad have blamed it on Guillain-Barre syndrome, a brief but devastating illness that shares many of the same clinical features.
NEWS
By Michael Kelly | July 13, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The wonderful thing about congressional hearings is the way they have of going off in hot pursuit of truths that are beside the point. (Did the nominee, or did the nominee not, make a remark concerning a pubic hair on a Coke can?) So far, the Senate hearings now under way into the fund-raising scandals of 1996 promise to maintain the tradition.Sen. Fred Thompson, the Republican chairman of the committee, set the agenda in his opening remarks, when he declared that the committee had evidence of ''the existence of a Chinese plan to subvert our election process'' and to ''buy access and influence in furtherance of Chinese government interests.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | November 20, 1994
In some ways, Xiaochuan Huang likes the American method of learning better than the Chinese.Chinese teachers may focus more on the basics and give more homework, but in American schools, students are given more encouragement and taught to do independent research, she said during a class at the Literacy Council in Westminster last week.Ms. Huang, 39, has experienced both methods of teaching. She graduated from a Chinese university and worked in Beijing for years.But when her husband, Xiaolu Zhe, got a job at Knorr Brake in Westminster in August, Ms. Huang found herself starting all over again at the Literacy Council.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | January 6, 1991
BEIJING -- In the first acknowledgment of legal actions against activists after the 1989 pro-democracy protests here, China announced yesterday that seven protesters, including four accused student leaders, have been sentenced to prison for two to four years.The four students, all from Beijing-area universities, are the first known recipients of court sentences from among a "most-wanted" list of 21 students labeled as ringleaders of the demonstrations that China's army brutally crushed in June 1989.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | August 17, 1994
YICHANG, China -- Thousands of construction workers are moving mountains near here in a race to block the Yangtze River for the world's most powerful, costly and controversial hydroelectric project.For the Chinese government, this grandiose venture -- the Three Gorges Dam -- is a high-stakes show of centralized power at a time when Beijing is losing a firm grip on much of the country.But the dam's many Chinese and foreign critics, who still hope to stop its construction, predict that the project will result in a human, environmental and financial debacle.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | May 6, 2003
At an awards dinner just a few years ago, a United States Air Force captain of Chinese descent, clad in a blue uniform dressed up with medals and military insignia, received a surprising query from a fellow guest: "Are you in the Chinese Air Force?" Capt. Ted Lieu wrote about the episode in 1999 - an op-ed piece author Iris Chang remembers well. Chang, who wrote the best seller The Rape of Nanking, had just begun thinking of writing about the history of Chinese-Americans. And Lieu's anecdote made her realize her book idea was, unfortunately, a necessity even in the 20th century, more than 100 years after Chinese began settling in America.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.