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By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | May 29, 2008
China Chefs, which opened in 1989, is tucked behind the Howard County General Hospital in back of a shopping center that is mostly medical offices. In all its years in business, the restaurant has rarely advertised, and it gives the impression that it prefers to be a place that only the discerning have discovered. On the wall, framed restaurant reviews from its early years claim that it is one of the best Chinese restaurants in the county, maybe even the state. (The key points are helpfully highlighted.
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NEWS
August 1, 2008
China has spent billions of dollars aiming to impress the world when the 2008 Olympic Games open in Beijing next week. But now the world is discovering that this rising giant has decided that it doesn't have to play by the rules. The government repeatedly promised that international journalists would have free access to the Internet as they cover the games. Instead, early arrivers this week ran head on into the sweeping censorship that hobbles Internet access for millions of Chinese. Press center access to more than 100 sites - including Amnesty International, which tracks world human rights abuses, and the BBC's Chinese language service - has been blocked.
NEWS
By Jane Meredith Adams and Jane Meredith Adams,Contributing Writer | June 13, 1993
SAN FRANCISCO -- The desperate attempts of hundreds of smuggled Chinese nationals to land by boat in New York and California has prompted an increasingly urgent flurry of activity in Congress about how and whether to narrow the gateway to freedom.Three bills in the House and two in the Senate are being prepared, all designed to toughen the U.S. asylum law.Rep. Romano Mazzoli, a Kentucky Democrat who chairs the House Subcommittee on International Law, Immigration and Refugees, said this week he will expedite his own bill on asylum reform.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau | September 11, 1993
BEIJING -- The Chinese company that owns the ship wrongly accused of ferrying chemical weapon components to Iran demanded almost $13 million in damages from the United States yesterday.The compensation claim -- already rejected by the United States -- capped a week in which China has sought daily to milk every angle of the affair for its potential propaganda advantage here and abroad.Though not likely to lead to direct retaliation by China, the incident and China's resultant rhetoric underscore sharply rising mistrust in Chinese-U.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 21, 1992
MELBOURNE, Australia -- In a dramatic story of survival and endurance, 54 Chinese who fled their homeland by boat have been found wandering in some of Australia's most forbidding terrain after surviving the Outback's searing heat and a diet of crocodiles, snakes and weeds.Police and coast guard planes and helicopters stepped up their search today for two other people still missing three weeks after their small fishing boat ran aground in a crocodile-infested mangrove swamp in Montague Sound on the remote northwest coast.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Writer | August 15, 1995
ATLANTA -- Amy Van Dyken was in a bit of a hurry Saturday night at the Georgia Tech Aquatics Center when she stopped to answer a few questions about the hot topic of conversation during this year's Pan Pacific Championships: the banning of China from the competition because of a growing drug scandal on its suddenly dominant women's team."
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | July 25, 1991
BEIJING -- Chinese officials blew hot and cold yesterday in response to the U.S. Senate's move to attach stringent conditions to the renewal next year of China's most-favored-nation trading status with the United States.China's state-controlled TV news last night briefly mentioned the Senate's action on Tuesday, reiterating the Foreign Ministry's long-held stance that attaching such conditions represented unacceptable interference in Chinese internal affairs.But earlier in the day, a foreign trade official expressed gratitude to President Bush in the expectation that he would carry out his promise to veto any MFN conditions in favor of unconditionally extending the trade status and that the veto would withstand any attempt at a congressional override.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | September 16, 2005
BEIJING - Visiting the Chinese capital for the first time since 1996 is a startling experience. Nothing you've read can prepare you for the overwhelming physical reality of China's explosive growth, its leap from the bicycle age to the age of Audis, cell phones and a middle-class passion for fashion. Wander through Beijing's glitziest malls and watch crowds of young Chinese chatting on cell phones, roaming in and out of Nine West, Mr. Klein, Givenchy, Rolex watch stores, Starbucks, Pizza Hut or the local Cineplex, and you realize Americans have paid too little attention to the world's biggest story.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | January 7, 1993
NEW YORK -- China's most-wanted man, dissident Zheng Yi, arrived here yesterday after being smuggled out of the country by an underground railroad of anti-government sympathizers and spending five months waiting for a visa to enter the United States.The 45-year-old novelist was accompanied by his wife, Bei Ming, who told reporters of their 3 1/2 -year odyssey: "In the past, under the totalitarian system, it would have been impossible for a wanted person to hide for three years. But the party has lost the heart of the people."
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | November 15, 1991
Some actions of two Chinese dissidents were transposed in an article Friday. Wang Ruowang led a protest march in Shanghai at the same time as the 1989 demonstrations in Beijing and wrote a protest letter to Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping. Zhang Weiguo is the lawyer and jhournalist who was mistreated in jail and warned his jailers they were violating Chinese law.The Sun regrets the errors, which occurred during editing.SHANGHAI, China -- Longtime Chinese dissident Wang Ruowang has some hard-gained advice for U.S. Secretary of State James A. Baker III, who arrives in Beijing today for two days of talks with Chinese leaders on human rights abuses and other points of friction between China and the United States.
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