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By New York Times News Service | May 16, 1995
BEIJING -- One of China's premier nuclear physicists, a designer of the country's first atomic bomb, joined 44 other scientists and intellectuals yesterday in calling on China's leaders to lift the "counterrevolutionary" verdict from those who took part in the 1989 pro-democracy movement at Beijing's Tiananmen Square.Wang Ganchang, who is now 88, led the elite group of Chinese physicists who developed and tested the explosive assembly and triggering system for the fission bomb that was exploded on Oct. 14, 1964.
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SPORTS
By Bill Glauber | March 23, 1991
The United States women's volleyball team was tanned, rested and ready after spending the winter months training in San Diego.The Chinese were exhausted, scrambling for rest in the midst of a tour on which they hop-scotch from Beijing to Moscow to Havana to Baltimore.The U.S. team was eager to unleash its devastating powegame. The Chinese were forced to counter the attack with junk and guile. For one night, at least, power overwhelmed junk.The U.S. team defeated China, 3-1 (10-15, 15-13, 15-10, 15-9)
NEWS
By Jeremy Brecher and Brendan Smith | March 10, 2000
ADVOCATES OF President Clinton's deal to admit China to the World Trade Organization claim it will benefit the poorest people of China. It is far more likely to drive down already pitiful wages, create hundreds of millions of displaced workers and lead to still worse repression. Proponents of the deal argue that increased exports will raise living standards for Chinese workers. But the evidence suggests the opposite. The National Labor Committee, based in New York, and the cf03 China Labor Bulletin, cf01 based in Hong Kong, have discovered that production for export is already creating a "race to the bottom" within China as regions lower their labor costs to attract foreign capital.
NEWS
By Niklas Swanstrom | May 4, 2005
THE CHINESE Communist Party is struggling for its survival because communism in China, for all practical purposes, is dead. China's recent surge in anti-Japanese protests and nationalism has been criticized worldwide for being intolerant and nonconstructive. The criticism is mixed with fear of the red dragon and the coming clash between China and the West over world domination. Moreover, critics have accused China's Communist Party of playing the nationalist card to gain popularity and support among the people, and this is partly true.
NEWS
By Greg Autry | January 24, 2007
IRVINE, Calif. -- China recently shot down an aging Chinese weather satellite - a signal that China will not abide by the doctrine of U.S. space superiority outlined in the new National Space Policy released in October by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. The policy states that "freedom of action in space is as important to the United States as air power and sea power." Further, it declares that the United States reserves the right to "deny such freedom of action to adversaries."
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | March 26, 1991
BEIJING -- Chinese Premier Li Peng, in a major report yesterday on China's development plans for the next 10 years, affirmed the country's open-door policies, cautious efforts to infuse its moribund planned economy with market forces and an abiding commitment to socialism in the face of "foreign hostile forces."The three-hour speech, opening a 16-day annual meeting of China's rubber-stamp legislature, provided few surprises but was the most detailed amplification to date of China's new five- and 10-year economic development plans, first drafted in December by the Chinese Communist Party's Central Committee.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | November 26, 1991
SHANGHAI -- Yang Huaiding's nickname is "Millions," and he earned it the hard way: by using China's fledging securities markets to parlay a small nest egg into a relative fortune.Portly and bespectacled, with a crop of badly cut hair, Mr. Yang, 42, is China's first successful independent bond and stock investor. His net worth now easily exceeds one million Chinese yuan (roughly $186,000). And his story would do justice to Horatio Alger.A former steel worker, Mr. Yang started down the road to riches with his life savings of about $2,000 and what he calls "a primitive ambition" to make something of himself.
NEWS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | September 26, 1994
BEIJING -- While a gunman's recent killing spree in downtown Beijing has focused foreign attention on China's disintegrating social order, it's the story of Chuan Chunying that marked a turning point for many Chinese.During the 1980s, Ms. Chuan was one of the country's most celebrated dancers, whose role in the musical "Silk Road Raindrops" made her a hugely popular artist.Earlier this year, she hired some workers from Sichuan province to renovate her apartment in Beijing. With city dwellers increasingly engaged in commerce and other lucrative trades, impoverished out-of-towners have taken over most manual labor jobs in urban areas.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 1, 1990
WASHINGTON -- President Bush met with China's foreign minister yesterday in a major narrowing of the distance between the two powers since the 1989 Tiananmen Square massacre and hinted at an eventual lifting of sanctions while acknowledging continued differences over human rights.The 40-minute session came a day after Foreign Minister Qian Qichen abstained from a United Nations vote in New York authorizing the United States and its allies to wage war against Iraq if it fails to withdraw from Kuwait by Jan. 15.U.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | June 19, 1998
When assessing an animated musical feature from Walt Disney, it's best to: Forget historical accuracy. Forget cultural integrity. Throw your notions of authenticity and consistency out the window and have a grand old time.In the case of "Mulan," this means forgetting whatever you know about ancient China, accepting anachronisms, anomalies and inconsistencies galore and surrendering to that special, if wildly anomalous, world known as Disney.Children especially should have no problem living in that world for an hour or so; indeed, they will be captivated by it. And "Mulan" has enough humor and visual sophistication to keep their adult companions not only awake but entertained.
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