Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChinese Society
IN THE NEWS

Chinese Society

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 9, 2001
BEIJING - Every Tuesday afternoon at 4 o'clock, a dozen citizens or more arrive at a gray brick building on the campus of Beijing Foreign Studies University and wait to be heard. Carrying sheaves of documents, photographs and sometimes their life stories, they file into an air-conditioned conference room one at a time and pour out their troubles to Wu Qing, a representative in Beijing's People's Congress, the city's parliament. Wu, who teaches American studies at the university, has been holding office hours for constituents since 1984.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 9, 2001
BEIJING - Every Tuesday afternoon at 4 o'clock, a dozen citizens or more arrive at a gray brick building on the campus of Beijing Foreign Studies University and wait to be heard. Carrying sheaves of documents, photographs and sometimes their life stories, they file into an air-conditioned conference room one at a time and pour out their troubles to Wu Qing, a representative in Beijing's People's Congress, the city's parliament. Wu, who teaches American studies at the university, has been holding office hours for constituents since 1984.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Arnold R. Isaacs | March 16, 1992
AS LONG AS NOTHING HAPPENS, NOTHING WILL. By Zhang Jie. Translated by Gladys Yang, Deborah J. Leonard and Zhang Andong. Grove Weidenfeld. 196 pages. $18.95. CHINA achieved material gains in the 1980s. But it also became a society adrift. In unchaining itself from the rigid doctrines of Chairman Mao Zedong, it seemed also to break loose from all its moral and philosophical anchors. Chinese no longer believed in their old revolutionary myths, but found no new ones to replace them.That disillusion, which underlay the 1989 protest movement centered on Beijing's Tiananmen Square, also lies at the center of Zhang Jie's "As Long as Nothing Happens, Nothing Will."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1999
For playwright David Henry Hwang ("Golden Child"), being Chinese-American has meant contending with "this idea of being perpetual foreigners."For architect I.M. Pei, it's meant that, even after 60 years in this country, "I'm still Chinese."And for Connie Chung, it meant beating her classmates to the punch when it came to joking about her distinctive appearance."The kids would say, `Can you see the ceiling and the floor, because your eyes are [so narrow]?' I used to make jokes about it. If I joked about it before anyone else did, then they wouldn't make a joke about me."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1999
For playwright David Henry Hwang ("Golden Child"), being Chinese-American has meant contending with "this idea of being perpetual foreigners."For architect I.M. Pei, it's meant that, even after 60 years in this country, "I'm still Chinese."And for Connie Chung, it meant beating her classmates to the punch when it came to joking about her distinctive appearance."The kids would say, `Can you see the ceiling and the floor, because your eyes are [so narrow]?' I used to make jokes about it. If I joked about it before anyone else did, then they wouldn't make a joke about me."
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 15, 1999
BEIJING -- When Americans visit this city for the first time, they are often surprised and encouraged by its increasingly modern veneer, including the glass-and-steel towers, the dozens of McDonald's restaurants, the cell phones and the occasional Mercedes. They often leave with the impression that Chinese are becoming more like Westerners -- which is true to a point.But the trappings of middle-class life are just those -- trappings. And nothing better demonstrates some of the stark differences that remain between the United States and China than their people's collective reactions to the NATO bombing last week of the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade, the Yugoslav capital.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 1, 1998
BEIJING -- Clenching her teeth over cups of tea, journalist Zhang Jieying recounts a few of the sad -- and sometimes sordid -- tales she's recorded over the past year from China's brokenhearted.They include the story of the 27-year-old office clerk whose boyfriend's wife caught them in bed. There is the young tour guide who resolves to marry a foreigner because she believes no Chinese man would want her, now that she's had two abortions. And there's the lonely wife who explains her growing reliance on sleeping pills and liquor after her husband has left her.Since she began writing a weekly column in Beijing Youth Daily last year, the 29-year-old reporter has broken ground in this reserved culture by exposing the private lives of Chinese people.
NEWS
July 5, 1994
ADVICE for parents of teen-agers, from Dorothy Parker, the celebrated writer of the 1920s and '30s who was known for her wicked wit:"The best way to keep children home is to make the home atmosphere pleasant -- and let the air out of the tires."* * *WRITING in the June 9 New York Review of Books, Princeton University professor of East Asian studies Perry Link offered this view of the debate over the U.S. government's granting of "most favored nation" (MFN) status to China:"Any efforts to find a new approach to the MFN problem are made more difficult by a sustained shrill monotone that issues from the U.S. business lobby, whose position, in effect, is 'All of MFN for all of China all the time, without conditions, ever, because it's entirely good for everybody.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 28, 1992
BEIJING -- The capitalistic changes in China in the past dozen years have made almost everyone richer, but in some ways they have also made life more difficult and more frustrating for the nation's 565 million women.As Chinese society focuses more on profit than on equality, and as Communist morality loses its influence, women are, in some cases, losing the ground they gained during the Maoist years.More now than under Mao Tse-Tung, they are being discriminated against in jobs, in housing, in land allocation.
NEWS
By Korea Herald (Seoul, South Korea) | September 6, 1991
WHETHER IT likes it or not, China has now become the world's leading defender of hard-line socialism, with North Korea and Vietnam, who espouse communism and depend heavily on the Soviet Union for economic and military aid, close behind. Inevitably, China and the like-minded governments in Asia will attempt to further close ranks against the international tide of political reform.With its ups and downs the Chinese leadership under Deng Xiaoping has steadily pursued reforms and liberalization in many aspects of Chinese society since the death of Mao Tse-tung.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 15, 1999
BEIJING -- When Americans visit this city for the first time, they are often surprised and encouraged by its increasingly modern veneer, including the glass-and-steel towers, the dozens of McDonald's restaurants, the cell phones and the occasional Mercedes. They often leave with the impression that Chinese are becoming more like Westerners -- which is true to a point.But the trappings of middle-class life are just those -- trappings. And nothing better demonstrates some of the stark differences that remain between the United States and China than their people's collective reactions to the NATO bombing last week of the Chinese Embassy in Belgrade, the Yugoslav capital.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 1, 1998
BEIJING -- Clenching her teeth over cups of tea, journalist Zhang Jieying recounts a few of the sad -- and sometimes sordid -- tales she's recorded over the past year from China's brokenhearted.They include the story of the 27-year-old office clerk whose boyfriend's wife caught them in bed. There is the young tour guide who resolves to marry a foreigner because she believes no Chinese man would want her, now that she's had two abortions. And there's the lonely wife who explains her growing reliance on sleeping pills and liquor after her husband has left her.Since she began writing a weekly column in Beijing Youth Daily last year, the 29-year-old reporter has broken ground in this reserved culture by exposing the private lives of Chinese people.
NEWS
By Arnold R. Isaacs | March 16, 1992
AS LONG AS NOTHING HAPPENS, NOTHING WILL. By Zhang Jie. Translated by Gladys Yang, Deborah J. Leonard and Zhang Andong. Grove Weidenfeld. 196 pages. $18.95. CHINA achieved material gains in the 1980s. But it also became a society adrift. In unchaining itself from the rigid doctrines of Chairman Mao Zedong, it seemed also to break loose from all its moral and philosophical anchors. Chinese no longer believed in their old revolutionary myths, but found no new ones to replace them.That disillusion, which underlay the 1989 protest movement centered on Beijing's Tiananmen Square, also lies at the center of Zhang Jie's "As Long as Nothing Happens, Nothing Will."
NEWS
November 1, 1999
REAL problems confront China. Getting into the World Trade Organization is one. Dealing with millions of unemployed in the cities is another. Staying connected to the growth of national sentiment on Taiwan is still a third. Nothing undermines confidence in the regime of Ziang Jemin more than its choice of the problem to seize by the throat. That is Falun Gong, the ubiquitous movement of exercise and mediation. It is no real danger to the regime, but a distraction of Beijing's choosing.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | July 11, 1997
Like the opium haze in which it shrouds itself, "Temptress Moon" presents a beautiful picture that takes its time getting nowhere.The latest unseen-in-China film from Chinese director Chen Kaige ("Farewell, My Concubine"), "Moon" is set primarily in the 1920s and tells the story of a wealthy family unable and unwilling to come to grips with modern society. Writ larger, it's the story of an ancient, closed culture unable and unwilling to establish much of a foothold in the modern world.Sent as a child to live with the opulent, but morally empty, Pang family (who use him mostly to prepare their opium pipes)
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.