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By Yu Shuning | January 30, 1997
I AM WRITING to point out that your Jan. 25 editorial, ''The two China's two-China policy'' is contrary to the fact and therefore incorrect.As is known to all, there is but one China in the world, and Taiwan is an inalienable part of China. This is confirmed by the United Nations General Assembly Resolution 2758.The great majority of the countries in the world respect and abide by this resolution. The government of the United States recognizes that there is but one China, that Taiwan is part of China, and that the government of the People's Republic of China is the sole legal government of China.
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NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | September 20, 2005
BEIJING -- One of the most exciting developments in China is the rising awareness at the grass-roots level that ordinary people have legal rights. Chinese law has long been used as a tool to help the Communist Party control the people; call it rule by law, not rule of law. But the country's staggering pace of growth has spawned all kinds of injustices, including a huge gap between rich and poor fueled by government corruption. The population is looking for redress. A few years ago, ordinary Chinese would have suffered in silence, afraid to raise their voices.
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NEWS
July 5, 1994
ADVICE for parents of teen-agers, from Dorothy Parker, the celebrated writer of the 1920s and '30s who was known for her wicked wit:"The best way to keep children home is to make the home atmosphere pleasant -- and let the air out of the tires."* * *WRITING in the June 9 New York Review of Books, Princeton University professor of East Asian studies Perry Link offered this view of the debate over the U.S. government's granting of "most favored nation" (MFN) status to China:"Any efforts to find a new approach to the MFN problem are made more difficult by a sustained shrill monotone that issues from the U.S. business lobby, whose position, in effect, is 'All of MFN for all of China all the time, without conditions, ever, because it's entirely good for everybody.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | September 21, 2004
BEIJING - Behind the choreographed withdrawal of Jiang Zemin from China's central leadership Sunday was the government's attempt to display a maturing Communist Party completing its first orderly transfer of power. By voluntarily handing control of the military, to President Hu Jintao, Jiang may have signaled the end of an era. But the behind-the-scenes maneuvering that preceded Jiang's departure from his last major post illustrated something much different: a political system still trapped in the opaque, Kremlin-style intriguing of a bygone era. The Communist Party of China is building a bureaucracy to run the country and writing rules by which to govern it, but all the key decisions continue to be made behind an impenetrable shroud.
NEWS
September 16, 2004
WHAT'S WRONG with the following conversation? "I want freedom to dream." "You protest too much." "It's the truth." What's wrong is that it contains certain keywords -- freedom, protest, truth -- that China's Internet nannies are trying to block in transmissions via the nation's most widely used instant-messaging service. Hackers recently obtained a copy of the government filtering program covertly installed on Chinese users' computers when they sign up for the IM service; it also blocks keywords in e-mail and phone text messages from those computers.
NEWS
April 13, 2003
ONE OF Mao Tse-tung's many famed aphorisms - the one about political power growing from the barrel of a gun - was a truth gleaned from staging a revolution and founding a new China more than 50 years ago. More and more, however, his successors are finding that success at building national economic power ultimately hinges on the free flow of information. And to put it in Marxist terms, therein lies the central contradiction for China's receding totalitarianism. The latest glaring example of this is the lethal flu-like epidemic that Chinese authorities essentially unleashed on their own people and the world by keeping secret its initial outbreak in Southern China last fall.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin and Robert Benjamin,Beijing Bureau of The Sun | September 6, 1991
BEIJING -- China yesterday lambasted the three U.S. legislators who briefly paid homage Wednesday to Tiananmen Square protesters slain in 1989, calling the memorial ceremony "a premeditated farce" that was "anti-China."A Foreign Ministry spokesman also accused them of breaking the law by staging an unauthorized demonstration on Tiananmen Square.The central Beijing square was the focal point of the pro-democracy demonstrations that were brutally crushed in June 1989, leaving hundreds, if not more than 1,000, dead.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 13, 2001
BEIJING - The Communist Party revved up its vast propaganda machine yesterday to convince the Chinese people that it had won major concessions from the U.S. government in exchange for Wednesday's release of 24 American spy plane crew members. In a mass-media assault designed to shore up support and deflect criticism, China's state-run newspapers ran identical stories lauding the agreement and portraying Beijing as the victor in the 11-day showdown with the world's lone superpower. "Our government and people have carried out a strong struggle against American hegemonism and forced the American government to change the original hard line and savage attitude and express their sorrow to the Chinese people," said a front-page editorial in People's Daily, the Communist Party's official newspaper.
NEWS
June 30, 1998
PRESIDENT Clinton is doing his countrymen proud in China. His triumph was made easier by the cacophony of critics putting him on the defensive for going. He also had an assist from Chinese President Jiang Zemin, basking in the consolidation of his own power as unquestioned leader of the world's most populous country.Their debate, unrehearsed and uncensored, live on China's television Saturday, showed Mr. Clinton willing to criticize China on human rights and chastise its decision nine years ago to mow down freedom demonstrators in Tiananmen Square.
NEWS
March 20, 2001
WHEN PEOPLE don't believe their government, it is in trouble. In classic tyrannies, the government monopolizes communication and this is not a problem. People might privately doubt, but lack a basis to contradict. Now the Communist government of China is failing to cope with changes in the game, even though it made the changes. On March 6, the village school in Fanglin, Jiangxi Province, blew up, with 42 children dead. Regional newspapers talked to parents, who complained that the school turned the classrooms into dangerous firecracker factories.
NEWS
September 16, 2004
WHAT'S WRONG with the following conversation? "I want freedom to dream." "You protest too much." "It's the truth." What's wrong is that it contains certain keywords -- freedom, protest, truth -- that China's Internet nannies are trying to block in transmissions via the nation's most widely used instant-messaging service. Hackers recently obtained a copy of the government filtering program covertly installed on Chinese users' computers when they sign up for the IM service; it also blocks keywords in e-mail and phone text messages from those computers.
NEWS
By Robert Benjamin | June 5, 2004
ANOTHER June 4 has passed - to be precise, yesterday was the 15th since Chinese soldiers killed at least hundreds of Chinese protesters in and around the symbolic heart of China, Beijing's Tiananmen Square. This anniversary, as in earlier years, played out according to familiar form: As the highly charged date approaches, China's security apparatus goes into high gear; those threatening to publicly mourn the Tiananmen dead are rounded up or put under watch; the often lively square temporarily becomes a twilight zone thick with police and security agents who scoop up isolated protesters; and the thin faM-gade of China's big lie still stands.
NEWS
By Gady A. Epstein and Gady A. Epstein,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 6, 2003
BEIJING -- When a nurse named Wang Fang lay in a SARS ward recuperating from the illness that nearly killed her, state-run television proclaimed she was a hero to the Chinese people -- a "white-clothed warrior" risking her life to help others. She knew better. Back at her apartment complex, neighbors were puncturing her husband's bicycle tires with thumbtacks, and management was threatening to post guards in shifts at his door to prevent him from leaving his apartment, lest he infect others with a disease he never had. When she returned home in May, recovered medically, it was not to a hero's welcome but to scorn and suspicion.
NEWS
April 13, 2003
ONE OF Mao Tse-tung's many famed aphorisms - the one about political power growing from the barrel of a gun - was a truth gleaned from staging a revolution and founding a new China more than 50 years ago. More and more, however, his successors are finding that success at building national economic power ultimately hinges on the free flow of information. And to put it in Marxist terms, therein lies the central contradiction for China's receding totalitarianism. The latest glaring example of this is the lethal flu-like epidemic that Chinese authorities essentially unleashed on their own people and the world by keeping secret its initial outbreak in Southern China last fall.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 17, 2001
BEIJING - When Jason Bu first heard the news that airliners had plowed into the World Trade Center, he rushed to a neighbor's apartment to find out if it was true. The news made him happy: "It's great!" Bu said. And the next morning, he taped a sign in Chinese and English to the back of his car, saying, "This is a lesson." As far as he was concerned, the hijackers had given the U.S. government a taste of its own bullying. A day later, though, he tore off the sign. "I realized how many people had died," said Bu. "I really felt sorry for that."
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 13, 2001
BEIJING - The Communist Party revved up its vast propaganda machine yesterday to convince the Chinese people that it had won major concessions from the U.S. government in exchange for Wednesday's release of 24 American spy plane crew members. In a mass-media assault designed to shore up support and deflect criticism, China's state-run newspapers ran identical stories lauding the agreement and portraying Beijing as the victor in the 11-day showdown with the world's lone superpower. "Our government and people have carried out a strong struggle against American hegemonism and forced the American government to change the original hard line and savage attitude and express their sorrow to the Chinese people," said a front-page editorial in People's Daily, the Communist Party's official newspaper.
NEWS
By Michael Mandelbaum | April 7, 1999
CHINESE Prime Minister Zhu Rongji arrived in the United States yesterday to find himself in a country only temporarily distracted by the war in Kosovo from a vigorous debate about the American approach to China.The debate is a version of the joke about the two men who take their dispute to a judge. The first presents his case and the judge says, "You're right." The second then presents his case and the judge again says, "You're right.""But your honor," the first man says, "we can't both be right," to which the judge replies, "you're right."
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | May 20, 2000
BEIJING -- In his inauguration speech this morning, Taiwan's new president, Chen Shui-bian, refused to knuckle under to war threats from Beijing and state that the democratic island is a part of "One China." However, the 50-year-old son of a tenant farmer continued to make overtures to the mainland in hopes of improving relations across the Taiwan Strait -- one of the most dangerous stretches of water in the world. In his much-anticipated, 4,500-word address, Chen spoke of a common history and culture between Chinese people on both sides of the strait and restated a pledge not to declare independence as long as Beijing does not attack.
NEWS
By FRANK LANGFITT and FRANK LANGFITT,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 12, 2001
BEIJING - A chartered U.S. airliner took off from Hainan island early today, carrying 24 crew members of a downed U.S. spy plane to freedom and ending an 11-day standoff with China after Washington said it was "very sorry" but didn't apologize, as Beijing had demanded. Given the political stakes and Beijing's earlier insistence on an apology for a collision between a Chinese fighter jet and an American spy plane, yesterday's agreement seemed a sobering outcome to an episode marked by high tension and harsh words.
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