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Chinese New Year

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By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2012
Fourteen-year-old Rachel Szpara of Parkville is convinced deep in her heart that at least a few drops of Chinese or Korean blood run through her veins. Never mind that her name is proof of her Polish ancestry. Who cares if her light-brown hair, tightly bound into two braids, points to German forebears? Or that her smattering of freckles — not to mention her fanciful imagination — may be part of her Irish heritage? As she practiced her calligraphy Saturday at the Chinese New Year's Celebration at the William Paca House in Annapolis, Rachel, a freshman at the Carver Center for Arts and Technology in Towson, expounded on the theory of her Asian roots.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 21, 2012
Fourteen-year-old Rachel Szpara of Parkville is convinced deep in her heart that at least a few drops of Chinese or Korean blood run through her veins. Never mind that her name is proof of her Polish ancestry. Who cares if her light-brown hair, tightly bound into two braids, points to German forebears? Or that her smattering of freckles — not to mention her fanciful imagination — may be part of her Irish heritage? As she practiced her calligraphy Saturday at the Chinese New Year's Celebration at the William Paca House in Annapolis, Rachel, a freshman at the Carver Center for Arts and Technology in Towson, expounded on the theory of her Asian roots.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Bill Daley and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 29, 2010
As the old gasoline ad urged, put a little tiger in your tank — and your dinner plans— this Valentine's Day. Feb. 14 also is the Chinese or lunar new year — the Year of the Tiger. And who better to put the spice into festive fusion dishes for two than that champion of East-West cooking, Ming Tsai? The host of public television's "Simply Ming" cooking series took to the assignment immediately. Indeed, he even decided to do a Chinese-themed Valentine's dinner at his Blue Ginger restaurant in Wellesley, Mass.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
It's not San Francisco, where thousands of people get to see a 250-foot-long golden dragon weaving its way through the streets every year. It's not Washington, where city officials closed down H Street last Sunday to make room for fireworks, kung fu demonstrations and the usual big parade. But if you want to celebrate the Chinese New Year without leaving Anne Arundel County, your best bet might be a vibrant little martial arts academy in the rear of an otherwise ordinary-looking industrial park in Arnold.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2011
It's not San Francisco, where thousands of people get to see a 250-foot-long golden dragon weaving its way through the streets every year. It's not Washington, where city officials closed down H Street last Sunday to make room for fireworks, kung fu demonstrations and the usual big parade. But if you want to celebrate the Chinese New Year without leaving Anne Arundel County, your best bet might be a vibrant little martial arts academy in the rear of an otherwise ordinary-looking industrial park in Arnold.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JENNIFER CHOI | January 17, 2008
On Sunday, the Lyric Opera House will host the 2008 Greater Baltimore-D.C. Chinese New Year Celebration. The event, which celebrates the start of the Chinese Lunar New Year, includes kung fu demonstrations, Chinese folk dancing and a performance of The Monkey King, an opera that combines singing and dialogue with acrobatics and martial arts. The show runs 7 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Tickets are $10-$30. The Lyric is at 140 W. Mount Royal Ave. Call 410-547-7328 or go to ticketmaster.com.
NEWS
January 17, 2003
Owen Brown resident Xiao Fang Xu, a distinguished professional dancer, will give a presentation Jan. 25 at the Savage branch library to celebrate the Chinese New Year. Xu, originally from Shanghai, China, will describe the Chinese New Year and show a video of Chinese classical and folk dance. The program will begin at 10 a.m. in the meeting room. The Chinese New Year, which this year begins Feb. 1, is a time of elaborate celebration. Xu said that people might confuse the day with World War III because of its booming firecrackers and boisterous parades.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tricia Bishop | January 17, 2002
Your desktop datebook may say 2002, but according to the Chinese lunar calendar, Feb. 12 will mark the beginning of the 4,700th year, along with the start of a multiday celebration known as the Chinese New Year, or Spring Festival. The holiday honors the start of farming season and the Earth's coming back to life after a silent winter. To prepare for the planet's rebirth, families in China create fresh starts of their own by cleaning their homes from top to bottom, paying their debts, cutting their hair and buying new clothes.
NEWS
By JEAN LESLIE | January 4, 1993
Happy 1993.Did you realize that in seven more years, we will be changing millenniums to the 21st century? Something to think on. . . .Although the outside is uninspiring at this time of year, there's lots happening in Elkridge and Ellicott City on the inside. I'll share with you just a few of the events happening here that may warm you up during these cold months.For example, children who celebrated New Year's Eve on Dec. 31, as most Marylanders do, can also celebrate the Chinese New Year.
FEATURES
By Kim Pierce and Kim Pierce,Universal Press Syndicate | January 25, 1995
Chinese New Year, which falls on Jan. 31, is China's biggest holiday -- and an ideal time to discover the ease with which dim sum can be prepared at home.Loosely translated as "heart's delight," dim sum is an array of appetizer-sized morsels, from meat-filled dumplings to sweet buns, offered on trays to diners, who select the ones that "delight their heart."In southern China, teahouses have served dim sum since the 10th century. The ancient tradition probably grew out of holiday feasting.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2010
Those restaurants traditionally thought of as most romantic are also the ones most likely to be crowded, with rushed servers and an overworked kitchen. Not romantic. My advice if you have to go out on Valentine's Eve (Saturday) or Day (Sunday) is to make an offbeat choice. There might not be quite the atmosphere; but you probably won't spend as much, and no one will mind if you linger, gazing longingly into each other's eyes. I have, however, included a couple of destination places in case you do feel like spending a little money.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bill Daley and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 29, 2010
As the old gasoline ad urged, put a little tiger in your tank — and your dinner plans— this Valentine's Day. Feb. 14 also is the Chinese or lunar new year — the Year of the Tiger. And who better to put the spice into festive fusion dishes for two than that champion of East-West cooking, Ming Tsai? The host of public television's "Simply Ming" cooking series took to the assignment immediately. Indeed, he even decided to do a Chinese-themed Valentine's dinner at his Blue Ginger restaurant in Wellesley, Mass.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JENNIFER CHOI | January 17, 2008
On Sunday, the Lyric Opera House will host the 2008 Greater Baltimore-D.C. Chinese New Year Celebration. The event, which celebrates the start of the Chinese Lunar New Year, includes kung fu demonstrations, Chinese folk dancing and a performance of The Monkey King, an opera that combines singing and dialogue with acrobatics and martial arts. The show runs 7 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Tickets are $10-$30. The Lyric is at 140 W. Mount Royal Ave. Call 410-547-7328 or go to ticketmaster.com.
TRAVEL
January 28, 2007
EVEN THOUGH YOU MIGHT think that Hong Kong would be crowded during the Chinese New Year -- the two weeks after the start of the lunar calendar -- it is quite empty because many residents desert the island for vacation. (The one exception: Disneyland, now 16 months old, which was so packed last year it had to shut its doors to day-trippers from the mainland.) And so, much like Paris in August, it is possible during the last two weeks of February to secure reservations at Hong Kong's hottest new restaurants and hotels, and there are many.
NEWS
By TYRONE RICHARDSON and TYRONE RICHARDSON,SUN REPORTER | February 3, 2006
Ballroom dancing, karaoke and a feast with traditional Chinese dishes are part of tomorrow's festivities to celebrate the Chinese New Year at Wilde Lake High School. "It's a comprehensive cultural celebration," said Jeffrey Shang, principal of the Howard County Chinese School and the event coordinator. "The Chinese New Year is really the biggest holiday of the year. ... This is a going to be a cultural showcase, and we try to present that in a colorful way to the community." The event, scheduled from 5 p.m. to 11 p.m., is part of the festivities for the year 4703, the year of the dog. The new year started Sunday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By BRITTANY BAUHAUS | January 26, 2006
Chinese New Year The lowdown -- The Baltimore City Department of Recreation and Parks' Carrie Murray Nature Center will host an arts and crafts event to mark the Chinese New Year on Saturday. Chinese legend holds that those born in the year of the dog share that animal's loyalty, stubbornness and eccentricity. Say goodbye to 2005, the year of the rooster, and hello to the dog days of 2006 with an afternoon of family activities. If you go -- The Nature Center is in Gwynn Falls/Leakin Park at 1901 Ridgetop Road.
NEWS
By KAREN GILLINGHAM and KAREN GILLINGHAM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | January 25, 2006
Want to live a long life? Eat a long noodle. Need to improve your marriage? Dine on chicken (even better if served whole). Riches? Luck? Decorate your table with tangerines and oranges. Want abundance in the coming year? Leave leftovers. Chinese New Year begins Sunday, and it's the Year of the Dog. If you were born in 1922, 1934, 1946, 1958, 1970, 1982 or 1996, you're a dog, along with President Bush and former President Bill Clinton. (Shirley MacLaine, Dolly Parton, David Bowie, Donald Trump and Steven Spielberg are other notable dogs.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 16, 1997
I am visiting San Francisco in mid-February. Will I be able to catch some of the festivities surrounding the Chinese New Year?The lunar year 4696, the Year of the Tiger, begins Jan. 28, so you will miss the actual turning of the calendar, but Chinese New Year festivities last more than two weeks, so you may be in San Francisco for some of them.The annual celebration culminates with the San Francisco Chronicle Chinese New Year Parade on Feb. 14. The highlight of the event is Gum Long, the 160-foot golden dragon symbolizing strength, adventure, courage and prosperity that writhes through the streets amid a cacophony of firecrackers.
NEWS
By KAREN GILLINGHAM and KAREN GILLINGHAM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | January 25, 2006
Want to live a long life? Eat a long noodle. Need to improve your marriage? Dine on chicken (even better if served whole). Riches? Luck? Decorate your table with tangerines and oranges. Want abundance in the coming year? Leave leftovers. Chinese New Year begins Sunday, and it's the Year of the Dog. If you were born in 1922, 1934, 1946, 1958, 1970, 1982 or 1996, you're a dog, along with President Bush and former President Bill Clinton. (Shirley MacLaine, Dolly Parton, David Bowie, Donald Trump and Steven Spielberg are other notable dogs.
NEWS
By William Wan and William Wan,SUN STAFF | February 6, 2005
There was something about the lion Nicolas Folcarelli simply didn't trust. For starters, it was dancing, the 2-year-old noticed. Secondly, it was swallowing children. "Run away, Mommy! Run away!" he yelled as the glimmering papier-mache lion danced a little closer. Nicolas and dozens of children crammed into Port Discovery yesterday to celebrate the Chinese New Year, which starts Wednesday. According to the Chinese zodiac, this will be the Year of the Rooster, but it was the lion that made the children squeal yesterday.
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